Removing wild horses from the definition of wildlife is a political maneuveur to deny the wild horses access to  water. An argument of the oppostion is that wild horses are not wild but ferral. However, recent scientific evidence proves that wild horses are indiginious to North America.

Wild horses are wild. The current Nevada definition of wildlife states  "'Wildlife' means any wild mammal, wild bird, fish, reptile, amphibian, mollusk or crustacean found naturally in a wild state, whether indigenous to Nevada or not and whether raised in captivity or not." No other species is singled out for exclusion, why should wild horses be?

In the 76th legislature, Nevada Assembly Bill 329 attempted to remove wild horses from the definition of wildlife. Even though Nevada voters overwhelmingly sided with the wild horses and the bill did not pass, it appears as though the argument will be pushed again during the 78th legislative session.

Las Vegas news station KTNV Channel 13 reported that the bill "...would have prevented the state engineer from approving water rights for wild horses in Nevada" and "would deny the animals access to water prevent water rights being issued if someone were to establish a wild horse sanctuary to promote eco-tourism" 

If you agree that wild horses should remain in Nevada's definition of wildlife, and that they should never be denied access to water, please sign the petition.

Robin Warren (Wild Mustang Robin) of Youths' Equine Alliance (YEA!), co-authored this petition. 

Letter to
The Governor of NV
We the undersigned oppose any alteration of the definition of "wildlife" in the Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS). We believe that the words in NRS 501.097 should stay the same. Wild horses should not be removed from the definition of wildlife.

The purpose of removing a species from the definition of "wildlife" is to deny them any protections or rights that they enjoy as such, including access to water. In the 76th legislature, Assembly Bill 329 attempted to removed wild horses from the definition of wildlife. Even though public comment overwhelmingly sided with the wild horses and the bill did not pass, it appears as though the argument will be pushed again during the 77th legislative session.

Nevada voters stand united to protect the rights of our wild ones. There are less than 30,000 wild horses left in the wild.
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Sincerely,