Petition Closed

As it stands now there is no national law to stop and prevent animal abuse or cruelty in the U.S. The federal government can and should enact strict laws to deal with a problem that is growing every day. As it stands now dogs, in particular—are the most common victims of animal cruelty. Of 1,880 cruelty cases* reported in the media in 2007: 64.5% (1,212) involved dogs 18% (337) involved cats 25% (470) involved other animals. The shocking number of cruelty cases reported daily in the media is only the tip of the iceberg. Most cases are never reported, and most animal suffering goes unrecognized and unabated. Government data scholarly studies of the prevalence of animal cruelty in domestic violence cases reveals a staggering number of animals are victimized by abusive partners each year.

The HSUS (Humane Society of the United States) estimates that nearly 1 million animals a year are abused or killed in connection with domestic violence. 71% of domestic violence victims report that their abuser also targeted their animal (Ascione, 1997). In 2007, 7% of media-reported animal cruelty cases either occured in the context of a domestic dispute or involved a person with a history of domestic violence. While animal abuse is not always crossed by state or local jurisdictions there is no way to keep track of offenders across jurisdictions when it does occur. A federal law will have records of whom and where the abuse/cruelty happened. From there an online registry added to this law will make it easier to track the offenders. This is important for animals shelters and breeders to able to know so another animal isn't adopted or bought to have another animal abused.

Letter to
Walking for Red The U.S. House and Senate and President.
Lita Wester
To make a national law for animal cruelty in the United State.

As it stands now there is no national law to stop and prevent animal abuse or cruelty in the U.S. The federal government can and should enact strict laws to deal with a problem that is growing every day. As it stands now dogs, in particular—are the most common victims of animal cruelty. Of 1,880 cruelty cases* reported in the media in 2007: 64.5% (1,212) involved dogs 18% (337) involved cats 25% (470) involved other animals. The shocking number of cruelty cases reported daily in the media is only the tip of the iceberg. Most cases are never reported, and most animal suffering goes unrecognized and unabated. Government data scholarly studies of the prevalence of animal cruelty in domestic violence cases reveals a staggering number of animals are victimized by abusive partners each year.

The HSUS (Humane Society of the United States) estimates that nearly 1 million animals a year are abused or killed in connection with domestic violence. 71% of domestic violence victims report that their abuser also targeted their animal (Ascione, 1997). In 2007, 7% of media-reported animal cruelty cases either occured in the context of a domestic dispute or involved a person with a history of domestic violence. While animal abuse is not always crossed by state or local jurisdictions there is no way to keep track of offenders across jurisdictions when it does occur. A federal law will have records of whom and where the abuse/cruelty happened. From there an online registry added to this law will make it easier to track the offenders. This is important for animals shelters and breeders to able to know so another animal isn't adopted or bought to have another animal abused.