Adjust Summer Tuition & Fees for Online instruction

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The University is planning on making summer classes online as a result of COVID-19 (and has notified students and professors allowing us to prepare accordingly a month and a half in advance). Yet, why are students still being charged the same amount of money for summer, online classes with intrinsically opposing conditions? What is the breakdown of fees that reflect how tuition for both online and on-grounds classes costs the same amount?

As both students and professors know, learning online and on grounds are two, completely antithetical experiences. While it is understandable that tuition and fees for the spring semester were not adjusted as the University had to transition to online instruction alarmingly quickly in response to the COVID-19 Pandemic to ensure classes could continue, the long term consequences of this pandemic, including the possibility of students not returning to grounds in the fall, mean online classes are the only way to sustain learning, and, therefore, means the university should adjust its fees accordingly. While summer classes are not required, the university's actions reflect its choice in deprioritizing students' ability to afford summer classes during this uncertain time. Some students, who do not qualify for financial aid, are still experiencing the consequences of the ongoing and deepening economic crisis. 

What is the breakdown for why the university is continuing to charge the same amount? Without changing professors' salaries, why does the cost of online, virtual classes still equate to on grounds and in classroom instruction, where we would typically be using the university's facilities and resources? Why are we paying $1492 for out of state students and $815 for in-state students for only 1 online credit? A typical class is 3 credits, meaning taking 1 online class this summer will cost $4476. While we understand the university was unable to foresee this global pandemic, we would like more transparency in its choice to not adjust or confront the high summer tuition fees for online instruction amid this unprecedented and frightening time. Thank you.