Petition Closed

Currently, federal immigration courts are working on deporting people who have been convicted of felonies over 5 years ago. The law is black and white, and sometimes cases do not fall into neat little boxes. My husband is a permanent resident who is a recovering drug addict. Eight years ago, he plead guilty to a felony and was sentenced to treatment and probation. He has been clean and sober ever since, owns a home, works, and pays taxes. We have a Family that will be destroyed if he is deported. This is happening to many people who have changed their lives. I have no problem with people being deported if they cannot follow the rules--but loopholes allow people who have been in trouble recently to stay and those who were in trouble a long time ago have no recourse.
This is not fair or in line with basic human rights. In Connecticut, a case can be re-opened for 3 years, so people who are current offenders have a chance to rectify their status. People who have seriously made changes do not have that chance. In 2004, attorneys did not have to inform clients on the "collateral consequences" of a guilty plea. Now, the system is going back in time and detaining people who have changed their lives and they have no recourse.
In my husbands case, our entire family are US citizens--including his parents. In our case, we will go from being "middle class" homeowners who work and pay taxes to foreclosure and potential inability to support our children.

Letter to
President of the United States, US Attorney General, State Senator Eric Coleman Barack Obama, DHS, ICE, CT Judiciary Committee
U.S. House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
and 4 others
Connecticut State House
Connecticut State Senate
President of the United States
Connecticut Governor
Please work toward assisting Permanent Residents of the United States who have been convicted of crimes and shown significant efforts at rehabilitation a chance to stay in this country. People who have been convicted pre-Padilla vs. Kentucky are just now being detained for removal proceedings. In many cases because of the conflicting state and federal law, they do not have recourse in the state court, and the federal court sees it as black and white. It is not right/fair to detain a person many years after they have turned their lives around and return them to their country. Many of these people have been here for most of their lives.