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Petitioning U.S. Senate
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Urge Senate to Pass Captive Primate Safety Act!

The Captive Primate Safety Act would bar interstate commerce of nonhuman primates for the pet trade, including monkeys, apes, marmosets and lemurs. This vital legislation would protect the public and captive primates from the dangers that result when these exotic animals are sold as pets.

On February 24 the bill passed the House of Representatives and was introduced in the Senate, where it stalled last year. Please take a moment to contact your U.S. senators and ask them to support and cosponsor this important humane bill.

In addition to the dangers nonhuman primates pose to the public, they often do not receive proper care when they are kept as pets. Captive primates require specific diets, companionship of other nonhuman primates, and large enclosures that allow for climbing and swinging. Unfortunately, most pet owners do not meet these needs - and as a result, captive primates often live in inadequate conditions.

S.462 sends an important message to the public that primates should not be sold as pets. Please take action now by emailing the letter below to your U.S. senators.


Letter to
U.S. Senate
As a concerned constituent, I am writing to urge you to support and cosponsor S. 462, the Captive Primate Safety Act. This important legislation would bar the interstate movement of nonhuman primates for the pet trade, including chimpanzees, macaques, capuchins, monkeys and other primates. The Centers for Disease Control already restricts importation of primates as pets into the U.S., but there is no corresponding federal regulation prohibiting interstate movement of these animals.

Nonhuman primates pose a number of dangers to the public. First, they carry viruses and diseases that can be transmitted to humans, including Ebola virus, Herpes B virus, monkeypox, simian immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis and yellow fever. Animals who present such a risk should not be kept in private homes with direct access to members of the public.

Second, primates typically do not make good pets because they often become aggressive as they grow older and stronger. As infants, they may appear cooperative and easy to handle, but as they grow, they can easily overpower humans and may lash out without warning when frightened or frustrated. Biting and scratching are normal behaviors for these animals, and their large teeth can inflict serious injury.

In addition to the dangers nonhuman primates pose to the public, they often do not receive proper care when they are kept as pets. Captive primates require specific diets, companionship of other nonhuman primates, and large enclosures that allow for climbing and swinging. Unfortunately, most pet owners do not meet these needs, and as a result, captive primates often live in inadequate conditions.

Nonhuman primates are wild animals, and as such, they belong in the wild. The risk to the animals themselves and to the public is too great to justify keeping these creatures as pets. Therefore, I urge you to support and cosponsor S. 462 to protect primates and people throughout the country.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,