Petition Closed

** In order for Paddington Skatepark to be maintained you need to sign the Skate Facility Strategy petition as well so that a strategy is put into place for the maintenance of all Brisbane Skateparks (including Paddington). 

Skate Facility Strategy Petition: http://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/provide-a-skate-facility-strategy-for-brisbane-skateparks **

Paddington Skate Park, which was developed almost 20 years ago, was once Brisbane’s premium skate facility. It was an innovative facility which led the way for skate park development throughout Australia.

Paddington Skate Park attracted skaters nationally and internationally, including world renowned skateboarder, Tony Hawk . There were regular national and international skateboard demonstration and competitions conducted at Paddington Skate Park. This had real economic benefits for the local skateboard industry and Brisbane City. It was the breeding ground for some of Brisbane and Australia’s best skateboarders, who went on to make a career out of skateboarding. As a result, Paddington Skate Park has played an important part in not only the history of Brisbane, but Australian skateboarding.

However, the facility is now out dated, unsafe, and overcrowded. Paddington Skate Park is no longer on the list of places to visit for international and national skateboarders, there are no longer national or international skateboard competitions or demonstrations, and local users are becoming dissatisfied. Upgrading Paddington Skate Park will once again place Brisbane on the map as place for skateboarders to visit, and encourage increased participation in skateboarding.

To show Brisbane City Council how important upgrading Paddington Skate Park is to you and the Brisbane skateboarding community please sign this petition and share among fellow skateboarders and skateboard supporters!

Letter to
Councilor Krista Adams
Councillor Peter Matic
Lord Mayor Graham Quirk
In response to strong community support, but subsequent rejection by Brisbane City Council, for an integrated, high quality, contemporary skate facility in the proposed Frew Park redevelopment, Councillor Matic and the Lord Mayor in 2011 indicated they would upgrade Paddington Skate Park – to date Brisbane City Council has not delivered on their commitment. I would like to see a commitment from Brisbane City Council that they will upgrade Paddington Skate Park to a high quality standard as soon as possible.

Paddington Skate Park is long overdue for an upgrade. The Brisbane skateboarding community strongly supports the Paddington Skate Park upgrade, and believe it is required for a number of reasons. However, we must make clear, to restore Paddington Skate Park to its former glory, the upgrade must be of high quality and standards, in line with national and international trends; be conducted by a professional skate facility design and construct company; and through high-level involvement with the Brisbane skateboarding community. Additionally, we stress the upgrade should be completed in one stage, not a series of stages, as repeatedly successive stages do not get completed because of uncertainties related to Council’s funding arrangements.

Paddington Skate Park, which was developed almost 20 years ago, was once Brisbane’s premium skate facility. It was an innovative facility which led the way for skate park development throughout Australia. Paddington Skate Park attracted skaters nationally and internationally, including world renowned skateboarder, Tony Hawk. There were regular national and international skateboard demonstration and competitions conducted at Paddington Skate Park. This had real economic benefits for the local skateboard industry and Brisbane City. It was the breeding ground for some of Brisbane and Australia’s best skateboarders, who went on to make a career out of skateboarding. As a result, Paddington Skate Park has played an important part in not only the history of Brisbane, but Australian skateboarding. However, the facility is now out dated, unsafe, and overcrowded. Paddington Skate Park is no longer on the list of places to visit for national and national skateboarders, there are no longer national or international skateboard competitions or demonstrations, and local users are becoming dissatisfied. Upgrading Paddington Skate Park will once again place Brisbane on the map as place for skateboarders to visit, and encourage increased participation in skateboarding.

Skateboarding has evolved dramatically since Paddington was first developed; therefore it no longer meets contemporary skater’s needs. Moreover, considering skate facilities have a 20 to 30 year lifespan, Paddington has almost reached its expiry date. Upgrading Paddington Skate Park would provide an opportunity to once again make this Brisbane’s premium facility, and consequently increase the facility’s lifespan.

There are a two primary safety issues associated with Paddington Skate Park for active users and the broader community. First, over the life of the facility, large cracks and gaps in joins have appeared on the riding surface. This not only reduces the facility’s functionality, but poses a significant safety issue. Riding over a large gap or crack on a skateboard is a trip hazard and potential for injury. In recent years, the cracks and gaps were so dangerous local skaters took it upon themselves to repair the facility. Brisbane City Council have a ‘duty of care’ to maintain community facilities at a safe standard. Upgrading Paddington Skate Park will reduce Council’s potential for claims of negligence.

Second, while the site is bounded by Caxton and Hale Street, it lacks visibility and subsequent passive surveillance opportunities, creating an environment for antisocial behaviour. In fact, there has been one reported case of sexual assault occurring at the Skate Park. Upgrading Paddington Skate Park provides an opportunity to improve the safety of the site. Modernising the facility, opening it up to the street, and installing lighting will attract more positive users to the site and improve visibility, thus reduce the likelihood of antisocial behaviour.

When Paddington Skate Park was built it was primarily designed to cater for one main user group: skateboarders. However, since then other wheeled recreation devices, such as freestyle BMX, rollerblades and scooter riders have become popular and frequent the facility. Because of these additional user groups, coupled with population growth over the last 20 years, and increasing skateboard participation rates, Paddington Skate Park experiences overcrowding, and subsequent collisions, during peak times. Expanding the facility as part of the upgrade will create more space for more users, making it more user-friendly and safe.

Skateboarders are naturally attracted to inner city Brisbane because of its accessibility, sociability, and number of street spots. However, since the proliferation of anti-skate devices, greater regulation and control over public space, and loss of public space, skateboarders are largely excluded from inner city Brisbane. This, along with inadequate skate facilities, means there is no appropriate, contemporary inner city venue for Brisbane skateboarders. Paddington Skate Park is in proximity to the city centre, is highly accessible by active and public modes of transport, and is co-located with complimentary recreation activities. Consequently, this makes Paddington an ideal facility to upgrade to meet the needs of modern skateboarders, and provide a legitimate inner city space where skateboarders and young people can recreate and socialise.
Finally, Paddington Skate Park is one of the only legitimate inner city places where skateboarders can recreate and socialise without being moved on or fined (i.e. King George Square). Overtime a solid skate scene and culture has developed at Paddington, with skateboarders forming a strong sense of attachment, place and identity. So much so, Paddington Skate Park may be considered the ‘spiritual’ home of Brisbane skateboarding. Reinvigorating Paddington Skate Park would further enhance the facility’s already iconic status, build on Brisbane’s longstanding skate scene and culture, and create a space where the current and future generation of skateboarders can hone their skills, and carve out a place of their own.