Waive Segregated Fees of Unusable Buildings for Fall 2020 Tuition

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Here we are again. In order to keep UW- La Crosse funded, the administration has decided to bring back all the students back on campus for Fall 2020. As of September 13th, the University has placed a "Shelter in Place" order for all the residence halls on campus, along with closing all the other buildings for the time being. Along with closing campus down, all of the students are still expected to pay full tuition prices. Due to the complete negligence of the administration students are facing the backlash of their decisions. 

The University of Wisconsin La Crosse is charging its students the normal "operating" fee for the buildings on campus that are closed due to COVID-19. One of the most important amenities that is not in use is the Recreational Eagle Center.  As of now, being physically fit is arguably the best way to keep ourselves healthy amidst this pandemic, and students do not have access to a gym facility, but are expected to pay the full fee. 

Students are also being charged the full fee for the Student Union, a place that houses coffee, food, UWL apparel and lots of study space that people would like to take advantage of to get out their houses during these very difficult times. All while, this building sits empty with the lights off.

The budget to fund these buildings was approved in the beginning of the schools fiscal year, before this pandemic started. Now, more than ever, students lives have changed dramatically and the burden of paying for these unusable buildings should not fall on to the shoulders of students pursing their degree through Zoom. 

I support the idea to fund these buildings to make sure we can use them in the future, however, I do not support the idea of paying the full "operational cost" of these buildings when they are not in operation. 

At UWL we are supposed to be open to ideas, and be willing to help students in these extremely tough times, and I do not feel that the university is looking out for the best interest of its students, but for the best interest in their pockets.