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Make Recording Lectures Mandatory at Glasgow University

This petition had 658 supporters


At the beginning of each semester, students will hear a familiar message from many of their lecturers: “we do not record our lectures, because we feel that you should attend them in person.” However, this doesn't take into account that there are many students with a mental health condition (or a physical disability, dyslexia/dyspraxia and international students!) who want to learn and attend their classes, but can't sometimes due to reasons beyond their control.

Edit: I would like to raise awareness to the continuing efforts of student bodies such as the SRC, Disability Service, Counselling & Psychological Services, etc, for their work in trying to encourage as many departments as possible to record their lectures. An existing lecture recording policy is in place, but still many departments refuse to record their lectures for varying reasons. There are also many existing efforts of teaching/pastoral staff within each department to raise awareness to this too. Therefore, hopefully the traction of this petition will open up a wider discussion and encourage more departments to begin the process of widening participation and recording their lectures.

It should also be noted that since the beginning of this petition, many have noted that this would also help international students exponentially, as well as students who suffer from dyslexia and dyspraxia.

The issue of mental health still has much stigma attached to it, and consequently the conversation of access to learning  for students with a mental health condition isn't considered as much as it could be when making university policy. For some students with a mental health condition, missing classes during a bad period of health isn't a choice borne out of laziness but an unfortunate inevitability. Although these students pay the same fees as others, achieved the same grades to get to the University and have the same enthusiasm for their subjects, they can be disadvantaged by not being able to access learning. It's no secret that PowerPoint slides alone do not reflect the full content of a lecture, and without recorded lectures, this means that it is almost impossible for students who have missed lectures (for reasons beyond their control) to catch up and perform as well in exams/assignments.

This worrying problem that many students at the University face can be addressed. After speaking to many other students and a positive response to a Glasgow Guardian article highlighting the issue of recording lectures, I've decided to start a petition to the University in an attempt to make it University policy for all departments to record their lectures. Many departments already do, which is great, but more could be done. Therefore, I hope that Glasgow University follow the positive action that many other universities have already taken and encourage all University departments - as a policy - to begin the process of ensuring all of their lectures are recorded. Perhaps the first step of this would be beginning to improve the technologies to allow lecture recordings department-wide. Although it is understandable that lecturers wish to retain their intellectual property, they are also educators when taking a position as a university teacher.

Needless to say, this will not only help students with a mental health condition, but all students for revision purposes as well. At the very least, perhaps if all lectures were to be recorded but only students with a proven health condition, or international students, could access them, then this would be a positive step.

Please do sign and share this petition, and if you want to hear more, below is a link to the Glasgow Guardian article making the case for this:https://glasgowguardian.co.uk/2016/11/01/no-recorded-lectures-ignores-mental-health/



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