Immediate action against culprits of zainab rape case

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Oliver Guenoun
1 year ago
Status confirmed: I have: read, approved of, supported, signed, and shared this cause, campaign, daily action, and petition. These actions were taken upon Thursday, the 05th of March 2020. This information has been typed for record(s) maintenance purpose(s). O:-|

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Rick Pervez
2 years ago
Why only Pakistan, Bangladesh is facing the same problems, it's high time for the world to put aside its differences and actually GET TO WORK

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Rabin Sekar
3 years ago
please take some action for this petition.

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Anita Kanitz
3 years ago
“In order to escape accountability for his crimes, the perpetrator does everything in his power to promote forgetting. If secrecy fails, the perpetrator attacks the credibility of his victim. If he cannot silence her absolutely, he tries to make sure no one listens.”
― Judith Lewis Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror

“I don’t believe rape is inevitable or natural. If I did, I would have no reason to be here. If I did, my political practice would be different than it is. Have you ever wondered why we [women] are not just in armed combat against you? It’s not because there’s a shortage of kitchen knives in this country. It is because we believe in your humanity, against all the evidence.”
― Andrea Dworkin

“I remember the rules, rules that were never spelled out but every woman knew: Don't open your door to a stranger, even if he says he is the police. Make him slide his ID under the door. Don't stop on the road to help a motorist pretending to be in trouble. Keep the locks on and keep going. If anyone whistles, don't turn to look. Don't go into a laundromat, by yourself, at night.

I think about laundromats. What I wore to them: shorts, jeans, jogging pants. What I put into them: my own clothes, my own soap, my own money, money I had earned myself. I think about having such control.

Now we walk along the same street, in red pairs, and not man shouts obscenities at us, speaks to us, touches us. No one whistles.

There is more than one kind of freedom, said Aunt Lydia. Freedom to and freedom from.”
― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale

Facts and figures: Ending violence against women
Various forms of violence

It is estimated that 35 per cent of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or sexual violence by a non-partner at some point in their lives. However, some national studies show that up to 70 per cent of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime [1].
Women who have been physically or sexually abused by their partners are more than twice as likely to have an abortion, almost twice as likely to experience depression, and in some regions, 1.5 times more likely to acquire HIV, as compared to women who have not experienced partner violence.

Although little data is available—and great variation in how psychological violence is measured across countries and cultures—existing evidence shows high prevalence rates. Forty-three per cent of women in the 28 European Union Member States have experienced some form of psychological violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
It is estimated that of all women who were the victims of homicide globally in 2012, almost half were killed by intimate partners or family members, compared to less than six per cent of men killed in the same year .
More than 1 in 4 women in Washington DC, United States, have experienced some form of sexual harassment on public transportation, according to a survey conducted in 2016.
Worldwide, almost 750 million women and girls alive today were married before their 18th birthday. Child marriage is more common in West and Central Africa, where over 4 in 10 girls were married before age 18, and about 1 in 7 were married or in union before age 15. Child marriage often results in early pregnancy and social isolation, interrupts schooling, limits the girl’s opportunities and increases her risk of experiencing domestic violence .
Around 120 million girls worldwide (slightly more than 1 in 10) have experienced forced intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point in their lives. By far the most common perpetrators of sexual violence against girls are current or former husbands, partners or boyfriends.
At least 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone female genital mutilation in the 30 countries with representative data on prevalence. In most of these countries, the majority of girls were cut before age 5. [8].
Adult women account for 51 per cent of all human trafficking victims detected globally. Women and girls together account for 71 per cent, with girls representing nearly three out of every four child trafficking victims. Nearly three out of every four trafficked women and girls are trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation [9].
One in 10 women in the European Union report having experienced cyber-harassment since the age of 15 (including having received unwanted, offensive sexually explicit emails or SMS messages, or offensive, inappropriate advances on social networking sites). The risk is highest among young women between 18 and 29 years of age [10].
An estimated 246 million girls and boys experience school-related violence every year and one in four girls say that they never feel comfortable using school latrines, according to a survey on youth conducted across four regions. The extent and forms of school-related violence that girls and boys experience differ, but evidence suggests that girls are at greater risk of sexual violence, harassment and exploitation. In addition to the resulting adverse psychological, sexual and reproductive health consequences, school-related gender-based violence is a major obstacle to universal schooling and the right to education for girls .
Twenty-three per cent of female undergraduate university students reported having experienced sexual assault or sexual misconduct in a survey across 27 universities in the United States in 2015. Rates of reporting to campus officials, law enforcement or others ranged from 5 to 28 per cent, depending on the specific type of behavior .
Eighty-two per cent of women parliamentarians who participated in a study conducted by the Inter-parliamentary Union in 39 countries across 5 regions reported having experienced some form of psychological violence while serving their terms. Psychological violence was defined as remarks, gestures and images of a sexist or humiliating sexual nature made against them or threats and/or mobbing to which they might have been subjected. They cited social media as the main channel through which such psychological violence is perpetrated; nearly half of those surveyed (44 per cent) reported having received death, rape, assault or abduction threats towards them or their families .

Measures to address violence

In the majority of countries with available data, less than 40 per cent of the women who experience violence seek help of any sort. Among women who do, most look to family and friends and very few look to formal institutions and mechanisms, such as police and health services. Less than 10 per cent of those women seeking help for experience of violence sought help by appealing to the police [14].
At least 140 countries have passed laws on domestic violence, and 144 have laws on sexual harassment. However, even when laws exist, this does not mean they are always compliant with international standards and recommendations or implemented. Still, 37 countries exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution when they are married to or subsequently marry the victim .
Availability of data on violence against women has increased significantly in recent years. Since 1995, more than 100 countries have conducted at least one survey addressing the issue. More than 40 countries conducted at least two surveys in the period between 1995 and 2014, which means that, depending on the comparability of the surveys, changes over time could be analysed .

Violence among vulnerable groups

Evidence suggests that certain characteristics of women, such as sexual orientation, disability status or ethnicity, and some contextual factors, such as humanitarian crises, including conflict and post-conflict situations, may increase women’s vulnerability to violence .
In 2014, 23 per cent of non-heterosexual women (those who identified their sexual orientation as lesbian, bisexual or other) interviewed in the European Union indicated having experienced physical and/or sexual violence by both male and female non-partner perpetrators, compared with five per cent of heterosexual women.
In a survey of 3,706 primary schoolchildren from Uganda, 24 per cent of 11 to 14-year-old girls with disabilities reported sexual violence at school, compared to 12 per cent of non-disabled girls.

What are some of the worst rape crimes in world history during wartime?

The rape of Dhaka : 1971, Numbers : 200,000 (Official) - 400,000

This is one of the most shameful war crimes in the history of humanity perpetrated by the Pakistani army (supported by the Razakars) during the Bangladesh liberation war of 1971. During the war, a fatwa in Pakistan declared that the Bengali 'freedom fighters' were Hindus and that their women could be taken as the booty of war ('gonimoter maal').

The total number of rapes is estimated to be between 200,000 to 400,000 during a nine month period. Some descriptions present an unbelievably gory picture of the massacre. Victims aged 8 to 75 were also kidnapped and held in special camps where they were repeatedly assaulted. According to some reports, the soldiers at one point used their bayonets to rape women.

The Pakistani army also raped Bengali males. The men, when passing through a checkpoint, would be ordered to prove they were circumcised, and this is where the rapes usually happened.

The Rape of Nanking : 1937 - 20,000–80,000

*(Some estimates go as high as 100,000) The International Military Tribunal for the far East suggests the figure to be 20,000.

This happened during a six week period in the Sino-Japanese war. A large portion of these rapes were systematized in a process in which soldiers would go from door to door, searching for girls, with many women being captured and gang raped. The women were often killed immediately after being raped, often through explicit mutilation[50] or by penetrating vaginas with bayonets, long sticks of bamboo, or other objects. Young children were not exempt from these atrocities and were cut open to allow Japanese soldiers to rape them.

The Rwandan Genocide : 1994 - 500,000

This happened over the course of 100 days. During the 1994 genocide, Rwandan women were subjected to sexual violence on a massive scale, perpetrated by members of the infamous Hutu militia groups known as the Interahamwe, by other civilians, and by soldiers of the Rwandan Armed Forces (Forces Armées Rwandaises, FAR), including the Presidential Guard. Administrative, military and political leaders at the national and local levels, as well as heads of militia, directed or encouraged both the killings and sexual violence to further their political goal: the destruction of the Tutsi as a group. This gave rise to the coinage of the term “Genocidal rape”.

During the conflict Hutu extremists released hundreds of patients from hospitals, who were suffering from AIDS, and formed them into "rape squads". The intent was to infect and cause a "slow, inexorable death". Survivors have testified that the transmission of the HIV virus was a deliberate act by talking about how the men, before they raped them, would say that they were not going to kill them directly but rather give them a slow death from AIDS. Two-thirds of a sample of 1,200 Rwandan genocide widows tested positive for HIV, and the infection rates in rural areas more than doubled after the genocide.

Brutal and Worst Rape Cases in United States

Cheryl Araujo case

Cheryl Araujo was gang raped in New Bedford, Massachusetts at the age of 21 in 1983. The incident took place in a local tavern where few men forced her and brutally raped her on a pool table. Eventually, she fought off the attackers and ran almost naked right into the street, screaming.

She was rescued by some students passing by, who took her to the nearest hospital. This is one of the few cases in which the name of a rape victim was disclosed openly, causing serious tension among the media worldwide. She died after a few years in a car crash.

Richmond High School Case

Richmond High school situated in Richmond, California, U.S, came into media scrutiny after a school student was brutally gang raped within its boundary. It was late night on 24 October 2009, when a homecoming dance was organized in the school. A classmate of the victim (name disclosed), invited her to join some of his own friends. They were having a small party in a dark courtyard.

Here, she consumes a high amount of alcohol (brandy), then she was propositioned for sex by the alleged offenders. Following her refusal they beat her to an extent that she became semi-unconscious, then continuously raped her for more than 2 hours. According to report almost dozens bystanders witnessed the act, but did not call for help. A local resident called the police.

Murder and rape of Heather Rich

On October 2, 1996, Heather Rich was gang raped on a remote bridge in Texas at midnight. Rich was a 16-year-old girl from sophomore high school in Waurika, Oklahoma. She was driven to the crime location by three young men, two of them her schoolmates. She went to her boyfriend’s, where he had already been drinking with his friends.

Rich was in a state of severe intoxication following a session of heavy drinking, when she was sexually assaulted and raped by two of the men while semi-conscious, with the third her boyfriend also admitting sex but claiming Rich had consented. Fearing a rape prosecution, Gambill decided to kill her and persuaded the others to help him. Rich was shot nine times on the bridge, and her body dumped in the creek.

Recy Taylor Case
Recy Taylor was an African American woman from Abbeville, Henry County, Alabama. On September 3, 1944, on her way from church, six white men attacked her. One of them was U.S Army private Herbert Lovett. Six men abducted her and took her into the woods, where they devilishly raped her at gunpoint. Taylor helplessly begged them to return home to her family.

Even after those men admitted the rape to authorities, juries subsequently declined to indict the men, meaning no charges were ever brought against any of Taylor’s assailants. In 2011, the Alabama House of Representatives apologized on behalf of the state for its failure to prosecute her attackers.

Michaela Petit and Petit Family

Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two daughters were held captive in their own house, raped and then brutally murdered. The case is also known by the name of Cheshire, Connecticut, home invasion murders.

According to the police, on July 23, 2007, the convicts Steven J. Hayes and Joshua A. Komisarjevsky struck her husband, Dr. William Petit, unconscious and tied him in the basement after invading their house. They then savagely raped the 11-year-old Michaela and her mother Jennifer Petit. To cover their crime they burned down the entire area along with two children and their mother.

The Hartford Courant referred to the case as “possibly the most widely publicized crime in the state’s history”. On August 2015, the state of Connecticut abolished the previous awarded death penalty, and both had their death sentences reduced to life sentences.

Elyse Pahler

A fifteen-year-old Elyse Marie Pahler’s body was discovered near her home in Arroyo Grande, California, on March 1996. She was raped and then murdered at the very same place by her acquaintances. It is apparent that they returned to the corpse and had sex with it on several other occasions.

Initially, they lured Elyse from her house with the intention of killing her as part of a satanic ritual. The defendants said they had to commit a “sacrifice to the devil” in order to give their band, Hatred, the “craziness” to “go professional”. The film Jennifer’s Body in 2009 was inspired by the story of Elyse Pahler.

A fifteen-year-old Elyse Marie Pahler’s body was discovered near her home in Arroyo Grande, California, on March 1996. She was raped and then murdered at the very same place by her acquaintances. It is apparent that they returned to the corpse and had sex with it on several other occasions.

Initially, they lured Elyse from her house with the intention of killing her as part of a satanic ritual. The defendants said they had to commit a “sacrifice to the devil” in order to give their band, Hatred, the “craziness” to “go professional”. The film Jennifer’s Body in 2009 was inspired by the story of Elyse Pahler.

Madge Oberholtzer
Madge Augustine Oberholtzer was kidnapped by the members of Ku Klux Klan (white supremacy) in March 1925, while working for the Indiana State on an adult literacy campaign. D. C. Stephenson a higher ranked member of the Klan, holding her captive in a train car, raped and tortured her.

She died from a staph infection from her injuries and kidney failure. Stephenson’s men then returned Oberholtzer to her home, presuming her injuries would be able to kill her and their influential leader will be out of harms way. However, she was able to give a detailed statement, which led to Stephenson’s conviction at trial and also led to the rapid decline of ‘KKK’ membership in the State of Indiana.

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Tharik Noushad
3 years ago
Justice for Zainab

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Christila Stephen
3 years ago
#We need justice for zainab

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Gopu Krishna
3 years ago
When every such brutal crimes occurs.we join together & giving our support or pressure to the officals to find the culprits.but still no ending for such crimes.Does it go like a contineous process?

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Gopu Krishna
3 years ago
This is not the india we want.

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Mohammed Rashid Ct
3 years ago
No matter whatever innovations and developments occur in the world, Women are still considered as goods for sale. I too have a sister of Zainabs age and I see my sister in every girl of her age. This news is pathetic and terrifying showing us the absence of humanity and morality.

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Yukta Srivastava
3 years ago
I want a country where a girl can roam in the streets at 10PM without any worries.