Give back your Nobel Peace Prize Aung San suu Kyi #Rohingyamuslimsgenocide

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Thousands of Myanmar’s ethnic Rohingya Muslim population are fleeing for Bangladesh. Democracy advocate Aung San Suu Kyi has had little to say about the unfolding humanitarian disaster.

Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi once hailed as her country’s Nelson Mandela has stood by as ethnically motivated violence and mass atrocities tear apart her country.

Now her reputation is rapidly disintegrating because of her refusal to speak out about — or take meaningful steps to prevent — the military crackdown targeting the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority. More than 125,000 Rohingya refugees have streamed across the border to Bangladesh over the past two weeks alone, running from what appears to be a crackdown on their villages by the military that still controls crucial aspects of Burma’s government, including the state security apparatus.
It is the second such major wave of violence in the past 12 months. The Rohingya who cross the border come with stories of indiscriminate killings and mass rape, and of villages burned to the ground and unrelenting persecution — all at the hands of the Burmese military. Their testimony only reaches the world through escapees; international aid groups and the United Nations are denied access to Rohingya remaining in Myanmar. The press has little to no access too; the stories told by the press are brought by those who have crossed over.
This latest violence came from violence: The Rohingya have a small armed faction that attacked police stations on August 25; some reports claim 110 died in the raids, including 12 police officers. But the indiscriminate and brutal response by the military has been widely criticized by the international community as radically disproportionate and approaching genocidal.
And yet Suu Kyi has said, and done, almost nothing.
Suu Kyi has been largely silent in the face of violence
Suu Kyi’s sole public statement about the blanket repression of the Rohingya has been a Donald Trump-style denial.
In a telephone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoǧan, she blamed fake news, and misinformation. (A Turkish government minister had apparently tweeted about the disaster, but used images from other crises.)
“That kind of fake information which was inflicted on the deputy prime minister was simply the tip of a huge iceberg of misinformation,” Suu Kyi’s office said in a statement, “calculated to create a lot of problems between different communities and with the aim of promoting the interest of the terrorists.”
While some of the images disseminated on social media were false, the crisis is all too real — and is sparking growing concern around the world.
“The authorities in Myanmar must take determined action to put an end to this vicious cycle of violence and provide security and assistance to all those in need," UN Secretary General António Guterres said in a statement on Tuesday.
Guterres underscored that the situation "risks degenerating into a humanitarian catastrophe with implications for peace and security that could continue to expand beyond Myanmar's borders."

 



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