Recognition for the Civilians of Yemen

Recognition for the Civilians of Yemen

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Yemen’s civil war began in 2014 when Houthi insurgents took control of Yemen’s capital and largest city, Sana’a, demanding lower fuel prices and a new government. Following failed negotiations, the rebels seized the presidential palace in January 2015, leading President Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi and his government to resign. As of December 2017, Hadi has reportedly been residing in exile in Saudi Arabia. In July 2016, the Houthis and the government of former President Ali Abdullah Saleh, ousted in 2011 after nearly thirty years in power, announced the formation of a “political council” to govern Sana’a and much of northern Yemen. However, in December 2017, Saleh broke with the Houthis and called for his followers to take up arms against them. Saleh was killed and his forces defeated within two days. Meanwhile, the conflict continues to take a heavy toll on Yemeni civilians, making Yemen the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. The UN estimates that the civilian casualty toll has exceeded 15,000 killed or injured. Twenty-two million Yemenis remain in need of assistance, eight million are at risk of famine, and a cholera outbreak has affected over one million people. All sides of the conflict are reported to have violated human rights and international humanitarian law.

Many Yeminis are close to being put into a state of famine and some countries around the world have sended their support. But much of the food has been stolen and the government has done nothing to stop the looting. And the people looting the food are the rich and soldiers fighting the war while the poor have no food to get from the food donations. When the government was accused of diverting aid from the poor and that if they did not stop the looting support would end. The government has not reported anything since then about the looting. All rebel groups in Yemen have stopped aid from getting anywhere which may lead to a widespread famine. The Houthi group has collected 1.8 billion in state revenues for the war effort and Saudi Arabia has funded 2 billion dollars strate to the Yemeni government. Instead the funding was sent to reconstruction and development programs instead of funding commodities such as food. The Yemen government also did not use all of the funds for said projects and are actually money laundering the money and keeping it for themselves.

Yemen is the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, with more than 24 million people and 80 percent of the population in need of humanitarian assistance, including more than 12 million children. Since the start of Yemen’s conflict in 2015 Civilians have been suffering everyday ever since. Nearly 2.3 million children under the age of five in Yemen are projected to suffer from acute malnutrition in 2022. The current level of hunger in Yemen is increasingly and is causing severe hardship for millions of people. 10 million children are left  without proper access to water and sanitation, as well as for 7.8 million children without access to education, following school closures right now. Yemen is the largest humanitarian crisis in the world and  3.5 billion dollars is needed to end this crisis.

The U.N.’s head of humanitarian operations in Yemen, Lise Grande, says that Yemen faces a worst-case scenario. The death toll from the pandemic could “exceed the combined toll of war, disease, and hunger over the last five years (in Yemen).” That could be over 230,000 deaths according to a U.N.-commissioned report from the University of Denver. Five years of war has shattered the country's health system, leaving it incapable of coping with a pandemic. The government has declared just over 900 cases, while rebels who control the capital and other densely populated areas say they have detected only four cases in their territory. The UN says that with testing kits in short supply and a lack of transparency in data from the rebels and the government, the actual number of cases are almost certainly much higher across the board. Alongside a lack of medicine to treat cases, medics in Yemen lack personal protection equipment (PPE), such as masks and gowns, to shield them from the disease. An unconfirmed report on privately owned Al-Masdar news website said dozens of medics had died as a result of Covid-19 in both rebel- and government-held areas

Here are some amazing sites to help donate towards the problems of yemen.

https://www.actionagainsthunger.org/countries/middle-east/yemen?utm_medium=paid+search&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=Country+Specific&utm_adgroup=Yemen&utm_term=yemen%20relief&gclid=Cj0KCQiAvvKBBhCXARIsACTePW8KreMq6mP0bVfYVODKvQjwQTRwfavIW_aBXJp7L7AS8vG8Oq1DMLMaAjT3EALw_wcB

https://secure.projecthope.org/site/Donation2?df_id=7804&mfc_pref=T&7804.donation=form1&s_subsrc=gs3&gclid=Cj0KCQiAvvKBBhCXARIsACTePW9a9nKLNshkgM9CaYe5j5gLTsiMLgVuQwL0wP2axvLrXsl8vARO61AaAnccEALw_wcB

https://www.gofundme.com/f/fasaj-yemen-is-starving?qid=d0f56695eb68d67ef878c82283b9bf66

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