Petition Closed
Petitioning U.S. House of Representatives

The border is not the problem


In July, as the U.S. House of Representatives prepares an immigration reform bill, we have an unprecedented opportunity to reduce excessive and unnecessary spending on the border.

Unauthorized migration is at an historic low. Net migration from Mexico is at zero. Leaders in Washington know this, yet the Senate just passed a bill that would more than double current spending on border enforcement, with a jump from $17.9 billion to $46 billion annually.

Who would benefit from this unprecedented jump in border enforcement spending?

The Washington Post reported that the parent corporations creating the technologies and gear outlined in the Senate bill have supported federal campaigns and candidates to the tune of $11.5 million since 2009. It’s no coincidence that products manufactured by these corporations were mandated for border security.

Residents of border communities already know all too well the dangers of unchecked abuses of power in their region. Reckless spending that supports contractors to the detriment of our communities is unacceptable.

We’re building a unified national voice to ensure that people calling for peaceful community-based reform are also heard.

Join us by contacting members of the House today—urge them to stand up to the Senate’s proposed jump in border spending.

Letter to
U.S. House of Representatives
As you work for immigration reform, peaceful community-based solutions MUST include stopping excessive and unnecessary spending on border enforcement that reduce the quality of life for border residents. The cost of border enforcement reached $17.9 billion last year alone. Increasing allocations of hard-earned taxpayer funds to expand this militarization is extreme and irresponsible.

Recent data shows that irregular migration is at historic lows and net migration from Mexico is at zero. Border cities such as El Paso and San Diego are among the safest cities in the nation.

The current financial investment in border enforcement is larger than all federal law enforcement and Secret Service combined. Rather than continuing this trend of wasting money, the responsible thing to do is to find peaceful community-based solutions for a border region that shares cultural and economic ties across national boundaries.

As you work to fix the current immigration system and prevent extreme and excessive spending on border enforcement, special interests of private corporations are looking for an opportunity to benefit financially from the construction of additional walls, an increased number of drones in the border region, new surveillance systems, and the degradation of the environment.

After decades of irresponsible spending on border enforcement, the opportunity to lead the creation of peaceful community-based solutions has arrived.

When passing immigration policy reforms, the Senate allocated $46 billion to increase border enforcement, which will be spent on unnecessary walls, drones and technology that could be spent to educate our children, train our future workforce, and improve the cross-cultural vibrancy of the border region.

As you look to shape immigration policy reform, I urge you not to follow in the footsteps of the Senate, but to do the right thing—stop the excessive and unnecessary border spending.