Petition Closed
Petitioning Executive Director of the White House Council on Women and Girls Tina Tchen and 2 others

The President Should Nominate a Woman to be Chair of the Federal Communications Commission

2,302
Supporters

President Obama has the chance to democratize the media with one key appointment in the next few weeks. The President is about to nominate the next Chair of the Federal Communications Commission, and he should pick a woman. Maybe there is no easy fix to getting women into the top jobs in the telecom and media industries, but the government watchdog can and should be headed by a woman.

There has never been a female chair of the Federal Communications Commission – the independent agency that oversees America’s telecommunications and media policy.

The FCC is supposed to represent the American public. Half the public are women. It’s long past the time to close the gender gap in our nation’s leadership and in the media and telecom industries' leadership, where only 28.4% of TV news directors were women in 2011, according to the Women's Media Center's 2012 Status of Women in the U.S. Media Report. And the post atop the FCC is one of the most important opportunities available to raise the bar for representational diversity and decision-making in the media and telecom sectors, which are the infrastructure of this generation and of the future.


Signed,

Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem

Founders, The Women's Media Center

Letter to
Executive Director of the White House Council on Women and Girls Tina Tchen
Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee Jay Rockefeller
President of the United States
Dear President Obama:

We're asking that you nominate a woman for Chair of the Federal Communications Commission. In the nearly 80 years since its creation, there has never been a female Chair of the FCC. The FCC is supposed to represent the American public. Half the public are women. It’s long past the time to close the gender gap in our nation’s leadership and in the media and telecom industries' leadership, where only 28.4% of TV news directors were women in 2011, according to the Women's Media Center's 2012 Status of Women in the U.S. Media Report. And the post atop the FCC is one of the most important opportunities available to raise the bar for representational diversity and decision-making in the media and telecom sectors, which are the infrastructure of this generation and of the future.

The media business is run by men – and some would argue, for men. Still. In 2013. There is no easy fix. The courts have struck down every attempt to increase female and minority ownership of commercial TV and radio stations. Almost every major telecom company is headed by a man. The glass ceiling is firmly in place in the media and telecom sectors.

The next FCC Chair should remember that she works for the people of this nation, not just for the telecom and media industries. The FCC Chair should promote diversity and work to increase competition in telecommunications and in media.

Women voters provided the margin of victory for you. I ask that you, as President, do what you can to break the glass ceiling at the FCC. Please nominate a woman to head the Federal Communications Commission.