2020 Canadian Pharmacy Graduates Responding Against Delayed Licensure to Practice

2020 Canadian Pharmacy Graduates Responding Against Delayed Licensure to Practice

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On April 15, 2020, amidst the global COVID-19 pandemic, the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada (PEBC) announced its intention to cancel its 2-part licensure examination for 2020 Canadian Pharmacy Graduates originally scheduled for May, to November 2020.  This decision effectively delays the licensing and entry of over 1000 new Canadian graduates into the healthcare workforce, who are ready to step up and begin assisting this crisis until January 2021 at the soonest. Earlier that day, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that certain healthcare sectors were facing serious staffing shortages, with less than 20% of staff in some sectors reporting for work.  

The PEBC cited concerns over public safety and inability to administer examinations as the chief reason for delaying licensing of 2020 graduates to January 2021.  Rather than taking leadership, and ensuring that the Canadian healthcare systems amidst COVID-19 have the support of over 1000 new pharmacists, the PEBC has instead elected to absolve itself of any further responsibility to Canadians, and to Canada's 2020 pharmacy graduates.  

We, as Canadian pharmacy students and to-be pharmacists, have been coming forward to willingly volunteer, hands-on, without expecting to be paid, so we can alleviate frontline workers during this time of crisis. Our expertise would go to waste, in a moment, when our country and the world are in every need of every possible effort, to vigorously content and fight this volatile disease. Our entry to the work-force will help alleviate hospitals, long-term care facilities, and community pharmacies.

Please sign this petition to help persuade the PEBC to reconsider its recent decisions to delay licensing of new pharmacists and the impacts on Canadian healthcare, as well as, to show your support for the next generation of future pharmacy professionals.  The most simple solution we bring forward to the PEBC has been to relinquish the Part II requirement, and use the results from Part I as an indication of satisfactory completion required for licensure and certification as pharmacists. We are an independent collective of Canadian pharmacy graduates, not affiliated with any university or provincial regulatory bodies, and we represent solely ourselves.  We will continue to advocate for ourselves entering practice in 2020. Thank you, and with your support, we will be fighting against COVID-19 and continue saving Canadian lives every day.