Petition Closed

Jasmine Brandl is fully ready for re-entering society as a productive, healthy member. In fact, this is the second time that Jasmine has been suitable for parole. At the age of 16, she was tried and sentenced as an adult and has spent 13 years in prison. In that time, she has co-founded with three other prisoners the Juvenile Offenders Committee (JOC), and has built the organization from the ground up to empower young women inside and outside of prison to find their self worth. She has completed both Offices Services and Graphic Arts certifications and has participated in many self-help groups, such as anger management, stress and trauma, domestic violence, celebrate recovery, houses of healing, alternatives to violence (AVP), conflict resolution, and grief group. She is also currently actively involved in Narcotics Anonymous and the Long Termers Organization. Jasmine has solid parole plans and has demonstrated a strong capacity to take on leadership and responsibility in positive ways and a sincere desire and ability to contribute meaningfully to society.

Letter to
Governor of California
Governor Jerry Brown
California Governor
I am writing to urge you to uphold the Board of Parole Hearings’ (the “Board”) decision to release Jasmine Brandl on parole. This is the second time that Jasmine has been suitable for parole. I am grateful that you have been consistent in following the law in supporting the Board’s recommendations for parole and again urge you to do so in Jasmine’s case. Penal Code §3041 governs the granting of parole. This statute establishes a presumption of parole suitability within subsection (a) which states the Board “shall normally set a parole date . . . after the inmate’s minimum eligible parole date.” It is estimated that 1,000 or more cases on this matter have been filed in the State’s backlogged courts. The cost of this litigation to taxpayers is in the tens of millions of dollars annually. Furthermore, with the State of California in ongoing budget crisis and each prisoner costing taxpayers approximately $41,000 per year, it only makes sense to release prisoners who are deemed eligible for parole.

Outside of concerns for taxpayers, Jasmine Brandl herself, as indicated by the Board’s recommendation for release, is fully ready for re-entering society as a productive, healthy member. At the age of 16, she was tried and sentenced as an adult and has spent 13 years in prison. In that time, she has co-founded with three other prisoners the Juvenile Offenders Committee (JOC), and has built the organization from the ground up to empower young women inside and outside of prison to find their self worth. She has completed both Offices Services and Graphic Arts certifications and has participated in many self-help groups, such as anger management, stress and trauma, domestic violence, celebrate recovery, houses of healing, alternatives to violence (AVP), conflict resolution, and grief group. She is also currently actively involved in Narcotics Anonymous and the Long Termers Organization.

Jasmine has solid parole plans to enter Crossroads transitional housing program when she is released. She has a very loving and supportive family who are eager to have her home, but she is choosing to go through Crossroads so that she can learn how to access as many tools as possible to help her gain self-sufficiency and independence. Jasmine has demonstrated a strong capacity to take on leadership and responsibility in positive ways and a sincere desire and ability to contribute meaningfully to society. I am confident, as is the Board after thorough evaluation, that Jasmine does not pose a danger to society and that any community would benefit from her presence.

Sincerely,