Petition Closed
Petitioning Ohio State House and 1 other

Tell Ohio Lawmakers: Help Improve Stroke Treatment in Ohio

Imagine being completely helpless, suddenly losing the ability to talk, walk or even call for help. These are only a few of the frightening effects a stroke victim experiences.

The bad news?  Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in Ohio and is the leading cause of disability. A stroke can impact anyone, at any age, and leave lasting effects.  The good news?  We know what needs to be done, but we need YOUR help to make it happen! 

If treated properly and quickly, the effects of stroke can be reversed.  However, the more time that passes from the onset of a stroke, the more likely it is that the victim will suffer severe, permanent disability. Unfortunately, stroke care in many Ohio communities is inadequate and fragmented and quick treatment is often hindered by lack of coordination among care providers, including emergency medical services, hospitals and doctors. 

We know how to treat stroke, but we need to improve our systems of care, starting with educating Ohio's lawmakers on the the changes necessary to make that happen.

Please take a moment to raise your voice and send your message today to improve care for victims of stroke in Ohio!

Letter to
Ohio State House
Ohio State Senate
Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in Ohio and is the leading cause of disability. A stroke can impact anyone, at any age, and leave lasting effects. However, it doesn’t have to – we know how to prevent and treat stroke.

Rapid treatment is critical in stroke care because time lost between the episode and treatment results in diminished brain function. The more time that passes, the more likely it is that the victim will suffer severe, permanent disability. Unfortunately, stroke care in many communities is inadequate and fragmented. Stroke treatment is often hindered by lack of coordination among care providers, including emergency medical services, hospitals and doctors.

Effective treatments are available, but few stroke victims get them. In fact, a number of approved treatments for stroke can dramatically reduce disability, but less than 10% of potentially eligible patients receive these treatments. In addition, stroke disparities exist by race and region.

The good news is that we know how to treat stroke, but we need to improve our systems of care. I urge you to support, or become a co-sponsor of, comprehensive stroke legislation.