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See the full version of our infographic here.

Did you know that more than 17 percent of elementary school students attend a high-poverty school? It's a nationwide problem, and one that's much more serious for kids of color: 45 percent of Hispanic and 44 percent of Black elementary schoolers go to high-poverty schools.

Now President Obama has a plan to modernize more than 35,000 schools, helping our most disadvantaged students have a better education.

Tell Congress to invest in America's children, and support school modernization.

President Obama's proposal would invest $25 billion in revamping ailing schools, and 40 percent of money would go to help to the schools most in need.

High-poverty schools are ones where a great majority of the students come from low-income families. Not all these schools are underperforming, but they usually struggle to maintain their facilities and attract teachers. Research shows that improving these factors improve learning.

Letter to
Tell Congress: Invest in Kids, Support School Modernization
U.S. House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
I am writing you to support of President Obama’s proposed $25 billion investment in school modernization outlined in the American Jobs Act.

Nationwide, 17 percent of our elementary students attend high poverty schools. Defined as schools where at least 75 percent of students receive free or reduced-price lunch, they serve mostly children of low-income families.

The picture is much different for students of color. Alarmingly, 45 percent of Hispanic children and 44 percent of Black children must attend a high-poverty school. These schools aren’t all crumbling, but they often struggle the most to maintain safe, nurturing environments for learning and attract the best teachers.

President Obama’s plan invests in children by helping improve 35,000 schools nationwide. And 40 percent of the money would be targeted to high poverty schools. Congress should act quickly approve the school modernization effort to promote greater equity and educational progress in America.