SWEDEN MONARCY PLEASE STOP USE BEAR-ROYAL GUARDS by LARS OLE MORTENSEN- DANISH JOURNALIST

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Lars-Ole Mortensen G r e e n l a n d, DenmarkMONARCY USE OF CANADIAN BROWN/BLACK BEAR SKINS by Lars Ole Mortensen The Danish Journalist

Lars-Ole Mortensen G r e e n l a n d, Denmark

 
Sep 8, 2017 — WE WON-NO MORE BEAR SKIN ROYAL GUARD HATS

BY LARS OLE MORTENSEN-DANISH JOURNALIST

(WE CANNOT STOP OUR PETITIONS THOUGH......THERE ARE OTHER ROYAL MONARCHYS THAT ARE STILL USING THE CANADIAN BROWN/BLACK BEAR SKINS FOR THEIR ROYAL GUARD HATS)

CHECK OUT THIS STORY I HAVE RECENTLY FOUND...

 

 

I found out recently that there was a post of back in 1888 The New York Times reported that "bearskin caps might be phased out because of a shortage of bear skins". The article stated that, "at that time, bearskin hats cost £7–5s each". But it was only a debate...it continued up to yesterday's ruling that they will phase out use of Canadian Black Bear skins. We won...

 

WE HAVE WON...ALL THESE COUNTLESS HOURS MYSELF AND ALL OUR COLLEGUES OF CHANGE.ORG...OF WRITING TO BUCKINGHAM PALACE HAS HELPED TO STOP THE CRUEL USE OF THE CANADIAN BROWN/BLACK BEAR AS ADORNMENT OF THE ROYAL GUARD

(WE CANNOT STOP...OTHER ROYAL MONARCHYS ARE STILL USING THE BROWN AND BLACK BEAR SKINS)

THE "BEAR" FACTS:


Total Of Between 50-100 - new bearskin caps are needed every year

Per 1 - brown or black bear is needed to make one hat for a guardsman

First Began The Use-1815 - was the year that bearskin hats were first worn by the Grenadier Guards following the Duke of Wellington's victory at the battle of Waterloo

Estimate Of Canadian Black Bears Left-600,000 - Black bears currently live in North America – a number thought to have fallen from two million

HERE IS AN EXCERPT ABOUTH THE HISTORY AND THE OTHER MONARCY NATIONS STILL USING THE CANADIAN BROWN/BLACK BEAR SKINS TO ADORN THE ROYAL CAPS FOR THEIR MILITARY CEREMONIES

Cloth caps worn by the original grenadiers in European armies during the 17th century and were trimmed with fur. The practice fell into disuse until the second half of the eighteenth century when grenadiers in the British, Spanish and French armies began wearing high fur hats with cloth tops and, sometimes, ornamental front plates. The purpose appears to have been to add to the apparent height and impressive appearance of these troops both on the parade ground and the battlefield.

During the nineteenth century, the expense of bearskin caps and difficulty of maintaining them in good condition on active service led to this form of headdress becoming generally limited to guardsmen, bands or other units having a ceremonial role. The British Foot Guards and Royal Scots Greys did however wear bearskins in battle during the Crimean War and on peacetime manoeuvers until the introduction of khaki service dress in 1902.

Immediately prior to the outbreak of World War I in 1914, bearskins were still worn by guard or other units in the British, Belgian, Danish, Dutch, Russian and Swedish armies.


Belgian Army Use Of Bearskin Hats
Until 1914 bearskins were worn in parade uniform by the Régiment des Grenadiers ("Regiment of Grenadiers") of the Belgian Army.  Its modern successor unit, the Regiment Carabiniers Prins Boudewijn – Grenadiers has readopted this headdress for limited ceremonial purposes.

The bearskin is also worn by the mounted Royal Escort. While this ceremonial unit is now provided by the civilian police, it was formerly part of the now defunct Belgian Gendarmerie and wears the pre-1914 full dress uniform of what was then part of the army.

British Army Use Of Bearskin Hats
Following the Battle of Waterloo and the action in which they gained their name, the Grenadier Guards were permitted to wear the bearskin. In 1831 this practice was extended to the other two regiments of Foot Guards then in existence. The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, Honourable Artillery Company and officers of Fusilier regiments also wear the bearskin as part of their ceremonial uniform. The bearskin should not be mistaken for the busby, which is a much smaller fur cap worn by the Royal Horse Artillery and hussar regiments in full dress. Nor should it be confused with the similar but smaller 'Sealskin' cap worn by other ranks of the Royal Fusiliers, actually made of raccoon skin.

Welsh Guards Use Of Bearskin Hats
The standard bearskin of the British Foot Guards is 18 inches tall, weighs 1.5 pounds, and is made from the fur of the Canadian Black Bear. However, an officer's bearskin is made from the fur of the Canadian Brown Bear as the female brown bear has thicker, fuller fur, and is dyed black. An entire skin is used for each hat.

The British Army purchase the hats, which are known as caps, from a British hatmaker which sources its pelts from an international auction. The hatmakers purchase between 50 and 100 black bear skins each year at a cost of about £650 each. If properly maintained, the caps last for decades.

In 1997 Minister for Defence Procurement Lord Gilbert said that he wanted to see bearskins phased out as soon as possible due to ethical concerns, but no replacement was available at that time.

In 2005 the Ministry of Defence began a two-year test of artificial fur for the hats. The army has already replaced beaver hats and leopard skins, worn by some of its soldiers, with artificial materials.

Army officials say approximately 100 skins are taken every year from the annual cull of thousands of bears by native Inuit hunters in THE Canadian Government.



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