Capital Punishment for Rapists in India

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STOP GEOENGINEERING
3 years ago
GOVERNMENTS DONT WORK FOR CITIZENS INTERESTS .

Water scarcity,Hurricane, Geoengineering, Cancer are MAN MADE & NOT NATURAL .
US HEGEMONY, MASS DEPOPULATION & TRANSHUMANISM of select few elites seems to be agenda.

Deadly GMOs -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO7mx8Emv78

Cell towers & 5G are deadly too -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9bdU_uw2Dc

Governments & Corporations work hand in hand to grab more money & power & silence the truth TAKING AWAY RIGHTS , RIGHT TO LIFE & DIGNITY, using taxpayers money.

https://emfcommunity.com/
climateviewer.org

Laws are made by corporations and governments work for global banks and big corporations. These entities can avoid taxes but the taxpayers have to pay it and they dont deserve right to participate in governance.

Demonatisation in India was done by Washington, as per globalresearch website. Aadhaar must be a CIA programme.

Money is made to corrupt.
Agenda 21, Depopulation
Secret societies operate in opposite of what people expect the world to be. Government & Corporate secrecy is deadly. Wars are fought for agenda & profits & possibly religion.

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Asha Kanta Sharma
3 years ago
I support the petition.

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Anita Kanitz
4 years ago
“The fear of rape puts many women in their place - indoors, intimidated, dependent yet again on material barriers and protectors... I was advised to stay indoors at night, to wear baggy clothes, to cover or cut my hair, to try to look like a man, to move someplace more expensive, to take taxis, to buy a car, to move in groups, to get a man to escort me—all modern versions of Greek walls and Assyrian veils, all asserting it was my responsibility to control my own and men's behavior rather than society's to ensure my freedom. I realized that many women had been so successfully socialized to know their place that they had chosen more conservative, gregarious lives without realizing why. The very desire to walk alone had been extinguished in them—but it had not in me.”
― Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking

“You own your body. You own your body. You own your body. Your center and your edges are yours and yours alone. In this world – this world of rape culture of ingrained misogyny and violence done against girls and women – you will encounter and absorb messages your entire life that place you on trial for the crime of existing as female in this world. That will question your right to wear or speak or move through the world in the way that you do. That will seek to harm you in ways large and small. As a woman, you will hold stories that sometimes feel too painful to hold. As your mother, that brings me to my knees. I grant you the strength to know that this too, you will survive. I promise you I will protect you with every ounce of life in my body. And where I cannot protect you from this world, I will love you inside of it – fierce and holy and precious beyond all knowing.”
― Jeanette LeBlanc

Since humankind exists men are using their genitals as weapons! They are always enslaving women with rape including child rapes, marital rapes, gang rapes, mass rapes, war rapes, forced prostitution and forced marriages, including sex slavery, child marriages, forced polygamy, sex trafficking. They are enjoying worldwide cruel rape pornography, child prostitution. And worldwide they make hate crimes against women, girls, female childs and babies like sexual murder, sexual torture, sexual mutilation, forced FGM (no men of these countries would marry a uncut child or girl, women and girls, which against this were murdered). Other male hobbies are honour killings, acid attacks, dowry murder, domestic violence and domestic murder, witch hunts, widow murders, sexual harassment in the streets, at school, at the workplace, at the campus and the society! What kind of world is that, what kind of men are these creatures? I don't know, the sad truth is, they are on this planet like we women and girls and nothing can make them disappear!

“What do I want now? I want to be treated with the respect I deserve in the current VA system and not be retraumatized. I want the men who did this to me to be punished and if that isn't possible, I want reassurance what happened to me will never ever happen to another woman in the Armed services. I want some restitution of the damage I have.”
― Diane Chamberlain, Conduct Unbecoming: Rape, Torture, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder from Military Commanders

“You're a survivor because every day you make a choice not to be governed by their harsh words or actions. No one has the right to take away your happiness”
― Assunta Harris, A Sheep Amongst Wolves

“I don’t believe rape is inevitable or natural. If I did, I would have no reason to be here. If I did, my political practice would be different than it is. Have you ever wondered why we [women] are not just in armed combat against you? It’s not because there’s a shortage of kitchen knives in this country. It is because we believe in your humanity, against all the evidence.”
― Andrea Dworkin

“Making someone feel obligated, pressured or forced into doing something of a sexual nature that they don't want to is sexual coercion. This includes persistent attempts at sexual contact when the person has already refused you. Nobody owes you sex, ever; and no means no, always.”
― Miya Yamanouchi, Embrace Your Sexual Self: A Practical Guide for Women

“She told me that my rape was not my fault, that I should feel no shame, that – simple as it may sound – I hadn’t caused it. No one causes rape but rapists. No one causes rape but rapists. No one causes rape but rapists. It was true. And it had not been obvious to me. And hearing it from someone else, a professional, someone who should know, helped me believe that soon I would believe it.”
― Aspen Matis, Girl in the Woods: A Memoir

Facts About Rape

Low estimate of the number of women , according to the Department of Justice, raped every year: 300,000

High estimate of the number of women raped, according to the CDC: 1.3 million

Percentage of rapes not reported: 54 percent

A woman’s chance of being raped in the U.S.: 1 in 5

Chances that a raped woman conceives compared to one engaging in consensual sex: at least two times as likely

Number of women in the US impregnated against their will each year in the U.S. as a result of rape: 32,000

Number of states in which rapists can sue for custody and visitation: 31

Chances that a woman’s body “shuts that whole thing down“: 0 in 3.2 billion

Rank of U.S. in the world for rape: 13th

A woman’s chance of being raped in college: 1 in 4 or 5

Chances that a Native American woman in the U.S. will be raped: 1 in 3

Percentage of women in Alaska who have suffered sexual assault: 37 percent

Number of rape kits untested by the Houston police force: 6,000-7,000 (Texas ranked second in nation for “forcible rape”)

Number of adult men accused of repeatedly gang raping 11-year-old girl in Texas: 14

Quote in the New York Times regarding the rape: “They said she dressed older than her age.”

Age of woman raped in Central Park in September, 2012: 73

Number of rape kits left untested in Detroit, listed by Forbes as one of two the most dangerous places for woman to live in the US: 11,303

U.S. state in which, in September 2012, mentally disabled rape victim was required to provide evidence of her “kicking, biting, scratching” in objection to her rape: Connecticut

State seeking to reduce childcare welfare benefits to women cannot provide proof of their pregnancy-causing rapes: Pennsylvannia

Percentage of sexual assault and rape victims under the age of 12: 15 percent

Percentage of men who have been raped: 3 percent

Percentage of rapists who are never incarcerated: 97 perent

Percentage of rapes that college students think are false claims: 50 percent

Percentage of rapes that studies find are false claims: 2-8 percent

Number of rapes reported in the military last year: 16,500

Pentagon’s estimated percentage of military assuaults not reported: 80-90 percent

Percentage of military rape victims who were gang raped/raped more than once: 14%/20%

Percentage of military rape victims that are men: 8-37 percent

Percentage of military victims who get an “involuntarily” discharge compared to percentage of charged and accused who are discharged with honor: 90 percent involuntary to 80 percent with honor

Chances an incarcerated person is raped in the U.S.: 1 in 10

Increase in chance that LGTB prisoner is raped: 15x greater chance

Number of men raped that could be counted as legally raped before the FBI changed its definition in December of 2011: 0

Number of rapes noted in commonly used World War II statistics: 0

Number of rapes of WWII concentration camp inmates: Untallied millions

Number of rapes of German women by Russian soldiers at the end of WWII: between 1m and 2m

Number of women raped in 1990s Bosnian conflict: 60,000+

Number of women raped per hour in Congo during war: 48

Country where 12 year old was forced to participate in the rape of his mother: U.S.

Country where women are imprisoned for being raped: Afghanistan

“Making someone feel obligated, pressured or forced into doing something of a sexual nature that they don't want to is sexual coercion. This includes persistent attempts at sexual contact when the person has already refused you. Nobody owes you sex, ever; and no means no, always.”
― Miya Yamanouchi, Embrace Your Sexual Self: A Practical Guide for Women

“She told me that my rape was not my fault, that I should feel no shame, that – simple as it may sound – I hadn’t caused it. No one causes rape but rapists. No one causes rape but rapists. No one causes rape but rapists. It was true. And it had not been obvious to me. And hearing it from someone else, a professional, someone who should know, helped me believe that soon I would believe it.”
― Aspen Matis, Girl in the Woods: A Memoir

A famous rape survivor:
Alice Sebold: Rape and redemption
Alice Sebold (born September 6, 1963) is an American writer. She has published three books: Lucky (1999), The Lovely Bones (2002), and The Almost Moon (2007)..
Her first novel was a brutal tale of murder, and sold a record two-and-a-half million copies in hardback. But the story of Alice Sebold's own teenage years makes for far more shocking reading in the book "Lucky".
Sebold began writing the book that would become Lucky in New York, as a ten-page assignment for her class. In its first drafts, the book was a fictionalized version of her rape and its aftermath; while in graduate school, Sebold turned the book into a "misery memoir." The book's title came from a policeman who had told Sebold that she was lucky to be alive, since another young woman had been killed and dismembered in the same tunnel.

At age 33, Sebold then began writing a novel called Monsters, about the rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl. The story was based on her realization that "within the suburban world of my upbringing there was as many strange stories as there were in the more romanticized parts of the world." The novel eventually became The Lovely Bones, which one reviewer called "a disturbing story, full of horror and confusion and deep, bone-weary sadness. And yet it reflects a moving, passionate interest in and love for ordinary life as its most wonderful, and most awful, even at its most mundane." The New York Times observed that "Ms. Sebold [has] the ability to capture both the ordinary and the extraordinary, the banal and the horrific, in lyrical, unsentimental prose."

In an interview with Publishers Weekly, Sebold said, "I was motivated to write about violence because I believe it's not unusual. I see it as just a part of life, and I think we get in trouble when we separate people who've experienced it from those who haven't. Though it's a horrible experience, it's not as if violence hasn't affected many of us." The Lovely Bones remained first on the Times Bestseller list for five months, was adapted into a 2009 film of the same name by Peter Jackson.

A famous child rape survivor:
Nujood Ali:
Nujood Ali (born 1998) is a central figure in Yemen's movement against forced marriage and child marriage. Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding. At the age of ten she obtained a divorce, breaking with the tribal tradition. In November 2008, the U.S. women's magazine Glamour designated Nujood Ali and her lawyer Shada Nasser as Women of the Year. Ali's courage was praised by prominent women including Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice.

Ali's lawyer Shada Nasser, born in 1964, is a feminist and specialist in human rights, whose involvement in Ali's case received much acclaim. Ali has also written a book together with French journalist Delphine Minoui called: I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced.

The English-language version of the memoir was published in March, 2010. Introducing the work, New York Times op-ed columnist Nicholas Kristof praised the work done to raise awareness regarding such societal problems as terrorism, associated with polygamy and child marriage, saying, "little girls like Nujood may prove more effective than missiles at defeating terrorists." Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali's case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an eight-year-old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009, after her father had forced her to marry him the year before in exchange for about $13,000.

In 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home, and has withheld most of the money paid by the publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa. He used the money earmarked for Ali's education to buy two new wives for himself, and, according to haaretz.com, sold Haifa into marriage with a much older man. Ali's ex-husband only pays her $30 a month alimony.

2015, Ali, now sixteen, has unofficially changed her name from Nujood, which means "hidden," to Nojoom, which means "stars in the sky."

“Actually, nothing hurts like hearing the word slut, unless it is hearing the word rape dropped about carelessly. Again, a word I wouldn't have thought much about, except that when I was in high school a girl gave her senior speech on her best friend's rape. She ended not with an appear for women's rights or self defense, but by begging us to consider our language. We use the word 'rape' so casually, for sports, for a failed test, to spice up jokes. 'The test raped me.' 'His smile went up to justifiable rape.' These references confer casualness upon the word, embedding it into our culture, stripping it of shock value, and ultimately numb us to the reality of rape.”
― Christine Stockton

Gang rapes were common today and yesterday since manhood exists:

1972: The rapists of Maggie dela Riva

1972 Jaime Jose, Basilio Pineda and Edgardo Aquino were electrocuted* in Muntinlupa for the gang-rape of actress Maggie de la Riva (or dela Riva) five years before.

The rising young actress had scarcely wavered after the assault before courageously making the always-fraught rape charge against a quartet of attackers themselves from elite families. (The particulars are recounted in the Supreme Court ruling.)Maggie de la Riva identifies two of the culprits just five days after her gang rape. Talk about facing your accuser; according to the accompanying article, “the frail-looking mestiza was a picture of righteous indignation as she extended her arms, showed her bruises, and asked Pineda, pointedly: ‘Do you remember these?'”

The case was a media sensation from day one. The Philippine film blog Video 48 republished a three-part series on the rapists’ capture (parts 1 and 2) and execution (part 3), complete with the desperate efforts of the offenders’ families to save them.

The victim herself continued her acting career.Decades later, she’s still a public personality, and seems to have made peace with and moved on from her famous ordeal with impressive equanimity.
Her statement:
"When that misfortune happened to me, that although my body was raped my true self was never defiled and that there’s another person in me that’s beautiful, strong and true. The old Maggie has faded away. I look at my experience as something that happened to someone else who is no longer the person I am today. "

The Philippines adopted use of the electric chair in the early 20th century from the U.S., its colonial ruler at the time. It’s the only country besides the United States to have used the chair.

One of the four condemned to death for the rape, Rogelio Canial, died in prison of a drug overdose several months before the executions.

The difference between the past and now is, mostly the rapists and sexual murderers are worldwide celebrated as heroes and real men. In the good old times they were mostly executed as the cowardly devils they really are.

“The mistake we make is in thinking rape isn’t premeditated, that it happens by accident somehow, that you’re drunk and you run into a girl who’s also drunk and half-asleep on a bench and you sidle up to her and things get out of hand and before you know it, you’re being accused of something you’d never do. But men who rape are men who watch for the signs of who they believe they can rape. Rape culture isn’t a natural occurrence; it thrives thanks to the dedicated attention given to women in order to take away their security. Rapists exist on a spectrum, and maybe this attentive version is the most dangerous type: women are so used to being watched that we don’t notice when someone’s watching us for the worst reason imaginable. They have a plan long before we even get to the bar to order our first drink.”
― Scaachi Koul, One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter

“Women have routinely been punished and intimidated for attempting that most simple of freedoms, taking a walk, because their walking and indeed their very beings have been construed as inevitably, continually sexual in those societies concerned with controlling women's sexuality.”
― Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking