Grandfathered in OCSA, get rid of the lottery system

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Olivia Silver
Oct 26, 2020
I actually saw this petition and had no idea what this school was, since I live in NYC. I researched a bit, and was outraged that a lottery system was put in place! IT IS AN ARTS SCHOOL! You can’t let someone on who can’t sing, or dance, or do whatever is included in their conservatory! I understand that now this allows all types of people to get in, but why can’t you just make the application easier if the application is too difficult? Then do an audition? It’s no longer an arts school when you let non-artists in. This is the most idiotic thing I’ve heard in my entire life!

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Hi BBs
Jul 17, 2020
Y'all really are out here being privileged AF. ART AND ART EDUCATION IS FOR EVERYONE. You don't understand that auditioning for this school isn't necessarily about talent and hard work, but, rather, whose parents can afford to have them take classes, build their portfolio, and film and upload their audition pieces. These are all things you take for granted. There are so many amazing, talented students who, yes, maybe don't have the skills going in but are no less deserving of a meaningful, artistic education, one that is not provided at your average public school -- in part because charter schools have been bleeding the public school system dry. This is the reason why OCSA is disproportionately white and wealthy compared to the city where it's located and the county as a whole. Also: I know the kids in that OCSA Student Life video you're using and I know for a fact that they agree with me on this and think that this school has perpetuated and inflamed the horrible inequalities that exist in OC. We all need to make sacrifices in the name of equality and justice -- that's what a real artist does.

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Acacia Carras
Apr 2, 2020
I agree with the statement and do not believe that an art school should have the adhere to the same admission standards as a regular public-charter school. For example, how can a child who has never played piano meld with a class of existing students who have been playing piano for their entire life? I just don’t think it will work.

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Sue Zhang
Mar 19, 2020
Just received the email from OCSA about the lottery based admission. If the admission is lottery based, the school won’t have enough talented kids and all the wonderful recourses will be a great waste. Please, keep the merit based admission to nurture our next generation of America. I don’t want to see America losing its competitive power in generations. Wake up, political correctness is no use to our county!!!

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Karla Mendelson
Feb 21, 2020
Our society does itself a disservice by not allowing schools to specialize. Be it Arts, STEM, Building Trades, etc., we should support kids with talent and drive who wish to get training in fields for which they’ve already shown a willingness to go the extra mile.

Having an audition process, rather than a simple lottery, makes sense for schools serving students with particular passions. Potential and drive matter as much or more than existing ability, and auditions allow judges to find the kids who show promise, not just a passing fancy.

Athletic teams — which receive tons of support in our school systems — screen for ability. Why should it be different for arts programs? They don’t field football or baseball teams based on a lottery. Should the quarterback position go to anyone who applies, even if they don’t know how to throw a football or execute a play? Similarly, imagine an orchestra where seats are filled by a lottery, instead of by knowledge of a given instrument.

The problem isn’t OCSA. The problem is that in elementary schools, where kids should be developing their abilities and discovering their interests, Arts programs are gutted. The message is, “The Arts don’t matter.” It’s no wonder arty kids are often bullied or considered weird. Can you blame such kids for wanting to be surrounded by peers who share their dreams and who know what it’s like to sacrifice free time to develop a creative talent?

We need artists. We need the creativity, the hope and beauty, and the thought-provoking works they bring into our lives. Let’s do a better job of giving young kids access to the Arts by restoring Arts education in elementary schools. Then keep providing them with specialized schools like OCSA, where they can further their growth amidst peers with similar passions.

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Chris Kluck
1 year ago
I tried hard to get into this school and was accepted based off of my ability in the arts. It is unfair to those who have artistic ability to be prevented from going to OCSA by a lottery system that disregards skill.

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Kassandra Guevara
1 year ago
I got to this school and many have worked hard and long so we could get in and to see that change it’s frustrating to know that people might now work as hard once they are in the audience process is what makes OCSA it’s what makes the students here unique

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Sophia Oppegard
1 year ago
This change would make OCSA not a desired school like before because of this new audition idea.
Plus students wouldn’t be as talented

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Mia Villalpando
1 year ago
People should sign this because the students that attend OCSA right now put in months of hard work to get in and now it is based on luck? OCSA's goal is to help the students thrive in their chosen talent. The school's entry process was based on skill and performance level and now it is based on pulling a name out of a hat. Help us bring back OCSA because we are but only a school but a family.❤

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Anya Ernst
1 year ago
I value the reputation and level of rigor that OCSA upholds through the audition process