Stop Coca-Cola from Using Six Pack Rings on Their Soda Cans

Stop Coca-Cola from Using Six Pack Rings on Their Soda Cans

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Marie-Jolie Wiley started this petition to Coca-Cola

Six-pack plastic rings. Why do this to the world? Why do this to the beautiful  marine creatures in once-beautiful oceans, when there is a simple fix that really any company can do, to restore our oceans to what they once were? Imagine what it was like, when there was no plastic in our oceans, or anywhere, for that matter... If Leo Hendrik Baekeland hadn't invented the world first "fully-synthetic plastic" in 1907... Yes, there was plastic before that, but it relied on organic-material. Anyway; onto plastic rings, why they're bad, and why you should sign this petition.

 

Most people just think, 'the sunlight will break down the plastic rings, and they'll just decompose, to the point where there's lots of tiny pieces, and the pieces are so tiny they don't matter anymore, and whatever.' Now, this is partially true, the sunlight does break down the plastic, and you do have tons of tiny pieces of plastic; But, these tiny pieces, called microplastics (see below), can take thousands of years to break down, and even longer underwater. In some point in time, the microplastics will be eaten by ocean beings. National Geographic did a report on how animals are eating tons of microplastics. Then thinking, 'If a human ate an animal that in turn had eaten some microplastics, are humans at risk?' You can read more about that at www.nationalgeographic.com Anyway; The process of the ring or the ring's microplastics breaking down could take hundreds - thousands of years if the ring is in shade or especially underwater. The rings in the six-pack can get around the animal's necks and strangle them. Thousands of birds, turtles, and marine animals are killed every year by abandoned 6-pack rings.

Only we can stop this. By signing this petition you are saving animals from this man-made world.

Wikipedia's definition of microplastic:

Microplastics are very small pieces of plastic that pollute the environment. Microplastics are not a specific kind of plastic, but rather any type of plastic fragment that is less than 5 mm in length according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). They enter natural ecosystems from a variety of sources, including cosmetics, clothing, and industrial processes.

Two classifications of microplastics currently exist. Primary microplastics are any plastic fragments or particles that are already 5.0 mm in size or less before entering the environment. These include microfibers from clothing, microbeads, and plastic pellets (also known as nurdles). Secondary microplastics are microplastics that are created from the degradation of larger plastic products once they enter the environment through natural weathering processes. Such sources of secondary microplastics include water and soda bottles, fishing nets, and plastic bags. Both types are recognized to persist in the environment at high levels, particularly in aquatic and marine ecosystems.

 
Microplastic samples
Additionally, plastics degrade slowly, often over hundreds if not thousands of years. This increases the probability of microplastics being ingested and incorporated into, and accumulated in, the bodies and tissues of many organisms. The entire cycle and movement of microplastics in the environment is not yet known, but research is currently underway to investigate this issue. Microplastic fibers identified in the marine environment

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microplastics
 

 

 

0 have signed. Let’s get to 2,500!
At 2,500 signatures, this petition is more likely to get picked up by local news!