Primary/Secondary school changes

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Children attending primary/secondary school should experience huge changes in their schools....now let's be honest, the majority of children don't like school or even hate it. Changes may occur to make children like school by time.

Take Finland for example,

Finnish children start school at age seven. There are no formalities, in fact they address teachers in their first names and there are no uniforms. Students do not sit for any exams until age 18.

Even age 15 students don't have more than 30 minutes' homework per night, let alone younger children. Paying school fees is illegal. Students have only four lessons daily. A teacher's job is so attractive that there are 10 applicants for every place on a primary education course, and only 10-15% drop out of a teaching career. This is all in Finland.

Their result? Education has become as big as nokia brand globally. Since 2000, this same country, Finland, has consistently featured at or near the top of international league tables for educational performance, whether children are tested on literacy, numeracy or science. More than 60% of its young people enrol in higher education, roughly evenly divided between universities and polytechnics.

As a secondary school student myself, I suggest that these major changes are considered to be gradually implemented in ALL schools of Malta. Students will work less and get better results for their future; Finland's education is clear proof that we students must be urged to work smarter and not harder.

According to the World Economic Forum, Finland ranks third in the world for competitiveness thanks to the strength of its schooling, which overcomes the nation's drawbacks, in the forum's view, such as restrictive labour market regulations and high tax rates.



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