School Segregation Today

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School Segregation Today  

“Yet with the march’s demand for school integration and economic justice still unfulfilled, how did test scores become the civil rights issue of our time?” -Valerie Strauss 

 

 

 

 

May 17, 2014, marked the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Ruling.  The Court’s decision held that public schools could not discriminate on the basis of race in education- “Separate but equal rule.”  For more information about Brown v. Board of Education visit http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/brown-v-board-of-education-of-topeka

While the Supreme Court’s ruling was the beginning of equality amongst African American’s and whites, school segregation is more prevalent today than it was 40 years ago.  This is because of the socio-economic classes amongst white and black children raised in low and high-income neighborhoods.  Public schools are funded by the property taxes that neighborhoods within the district pay.  Middle class and wealthy neighborhoods predominately made up of Caucasian families, pay much more property taxes for schools within their districts.  However, families of color who come from low poverty neighborhoods do not pay nearly as much taxes for their schools and cannot fund enough money for a quality education.  How does this relate to school segregation?  White students are guaranteed adequate materials and well-paid teachers to help them achieve a high level of education.  Whereas children of color attend schools where they struggle to earn the basic needs to help their students succeed. 

Along with property taxes, public schools are funded by their students average standardized test scores.  Students who attend wealthy schools score high on these tests because they have access to sources that will help them learn and understand the material.  However, students who attend low-income schools do not have these sources and do not meet the standardized test requirements.  

Children who fall behind significantly have a high chance of dropping out of school as early as their freshman year of high school and can face unemployment later in life.  Many African American’s face an 18% chance of unemployment, even with a high school diploma.  Even though every child is guaranteed an education, students from these low poverty areas face obstacles that discriminate them from having the same advantage as white students. 

I am an aspiring teacher and I believe high-quality education is meant for all students in order to achieve their goals and ambitions successfully.  So why is education only limited to a certain amount of students?  Students of all color have the right to go to school, but they do not have the same privilege as those students fortunate enough who attend a wealthy school.

Ultimately, in order to overcome school segregation, it is up to American citizens to reform the way schools are integrated.  If you too want to change the way we fund our schools join me in this petition.  By changing the way we fund our schools, we can provide an equal, advanced education for all students.     

 


Sources/links:

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/1-demographic-trends-and-economic-well-being/

https://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/rights/landmark_brown.html

 



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