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Relocation of Confederate Statue on Owensboro Courthouse Lawn to Museum

This petition had 308 supporters


We support the relocation of the Confederate Soldier statue from the Owensboro Courthouse lawn to a museum.

The Confederate soldier statue was erected in 1900, by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. It was erected during the Jim Crow era, a time when segregation laws still dominated our country. The granite base of the statue consists of a wreath encircling a Confederate flag and states "To Our Confederate Heroes".

The statue represents a dark time in our country's history and does not accurately represent a hero for so many of our Owensboro citizens, only a stark reminder of a time when freedoms were not afforded to all. We would like to believe we have progressed as a city in the last 117 years and realize that parts of our history should not be celebrated with such statues, especially on our courthouse lawn, which is paid for by the tax dollars of all Owensboro citizens. Instead, they should be remembered in museums, with other memorabilia of times past.

Our goal is not an attempt to forget or change history with the replacement of the statue, but to place it in a museum where it can be a reminder of our country's painful past, not a daily reminder of individuals who were once celebrated for enslaving our citizens, supporting the institution of slavery and racism within our country.

As our children grow up in this city, we want to create an environment that is inclusive and does not represent or celebrate a time of slavery or segregation. History will be no more erased by its absence than Hitler, Stalin, or Hussein when their monuments were toppled. Leave no trophies of hate. We will remember well enough without visual reminders on the courthouse lawn.



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