Prevent proposed assessment standardization at King's

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Given past students complaining about the variation in in-course assessments between modules within undergraduate bioscience degrees, it has been proposed by King's to standardize module assessments.

This entails introducing measures such as ensuring all end of year exams are worth 60% of the module, meaning coursework cannot exceed 40%. Thus module organizers will be restricted to only essays, or presentation based assessments, or 'e-tests', but not a combination of all three. 

6BBYN302 Perspectives on Pain and Disorders of the Nervous System is one module that exemplifies the advantage of having more in-course assessment. Over the course of one semester students actively learn the course content (as well as primary extra evidence beyond it) through a journal club, debate, poster presentation, essay and e-test. As well as this they are equipped with analytical, organisational and team-work skill sets that are fundamental to almost every career.

Though it is a difficult semester in combination with other 30 credit modules, it is certainly better than purely passive learning from lectures and minimal in course assessment. With this new standardization system, this is the future outlook of undergraduate courses at King's. Furthermore, there is a risk to 6BBYN302 being scrapped under the new system, given its central reliance on having diverse in-course assessments to complement the taught material.

If you agree with the above, please sign this petition to prevent King's organizers introducing the proposed new assessment system that will be detrimental to the quality of learning here at King's. A decision is being made in February - we need as many people to sign as possible before then to get the attention of Professor McFadzean, Dean of Bioscience Education.

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