Anti Hazing Law

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 The effectiveness of the Anti-Hazing Law is once again being questioned as violent initiation rites by a fraternity claimed another life of a young law student.

University of Santo Tomas student Horatio Castillo III died on September 17 due to traumatic injuries he sustained allegedly at the hands of members of the Aegis Juris fraternity.

 
It is clear for the parents of the 22-year-old that their son “was killed by criminals” from the fraternity, expressing outrage that “barbaric and criminal acts continue to be performed in the false name of brotherhood.”

These violent acts were supposed to be prevented by the Anti-Hazing Law. But many believe that the law lacks the needed teeth to actually end the long-standing “tradition” of violence present among organizations – particularly fraternities and sororities. (READ: Inside the brotherhood: Thoughts on fraternity violence)

What does the law say?

In 1991, Ateneo law student Leonardo “Lenny” Villa died after suffering multiple injuries from hazing rites conducted by the Aquilia Legis fraternity.

His death shed light on the practice and led to the enactment of the Anti-Hazing Law in 1995. But Republic Act No. 8049 still does not really prevent hazing from taking place.

The law defines hazing as “an initiation rite or practice as a prerequisite for admission into membership in a fraternity, sorority or organization by placing the recruit, neophyte or applicant in some embarrassing or humiliating situations such as forcing him to do menial, silly, foolish and other similar tasks or activities or otherwise subjecting him to physical or psychological suffering or injury.”



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