Petition Closed

Primarily National Parks are created to conserve the floral and faunal biodiversity found in natural areas, and provide habitats for permanent and migrating animals in the area. They are recognised nationally and internationally as being the most effective method of improving the conservation and biodiversity values of reserves.

National Parks also protect cultural sites such as shell middens, scar trees and cave paintings from being damaged by human activities, and involve indigenous peoples by including their lands in indigenous protected areas (Figgis, Australia’s National Parks: Future Directions, 1999).

That is not to say that the general community cannot continue to use and enjoy National Parks in the same way they enjoyed reserves. Many recreational activities are allowed in National Parks such as walking, camping, boating and canoeing, fishing and swimming. It is this recreational aspect of National Parks that make them particularly viable for tourism.

National Parks receive 'top billing' in many tourist guides as places to visit and as such boost the economy of local areas. For example, the Grampians National Park contributed over $150 million to the regional economy. The increased popularity of National Parks also allows for more employment opportunities of both indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

It is not only the income generated by visitation that makes National Parks important to the economy but also a variety of potential ecosystem services. Ecosystem services benefits include catchment protection, water production, protection of soil stability, climatic controls, carbon sinks, genetic resources, pollination of economic species, habitat for economically important species such as insectivorous birds and the protection of hatcheries of commercial aquatic species (Beattie, Commercial Exploration of Biodiversity, 1995).

Overall, National Parks are an important and valuable resource for scientists, educators and the community due to the variety of aesthetic, recreational and economic uses they offer.

Letter to
President of the United States President Obama
Senator Barbara Boxer
Representative John Campbell
and 18 others
Representative Doris Matsui
Representative Ami Bera
Representative Tom McClintock
Representative Jeff Denham
U.S. House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
Senator Dianne Feinstein
Senator John McCain
Representative George Miller 2
Representative Doug LaMalfa
Representative Jared Huffman
Representative John Garamendi
Representative Mike Thompson
Representative Paul Cook
Representative Jerry McNerney
Representative Gloria Negrete Mcleod
Representative Eric Swalwell
President of the United States
I just signed the following petition addressed to: President of the United States of America.

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Salton Sea of California: Make a National Park

Primarily National Parks are created to conserve the floral and faunal biodiversity found in natural areas, and provide habitats for permanent and migrating animals in the area. They are recognised nationally and internationally as being the most effective method of improving the conservation and biodiversity values of reserves.

National Parks also protect cultural sites such as shell middens, scar trees and cave paintings from being damaged by human activities, and involve indigenous peoples by including their lands in indigenous protected areas (Figgis, Australia’s National Parks: Future Directions, 1999).

That is not to say that the general community cannot continue to use and enjoy National Parks in the same way they enjoyed reserves. Many recreational activities are allowed in National Parks such as walking, camping, boating and canoeing, fishing and swimming. It is this recreational aspect of National Parks that make them particularly viable for tourism.

National Parks receive 'top billing' in many tourist guides as places to visit and as such boost the economy of local areas. For example, the Grampians National Park contributed over $150 million to the regional economy. The increased popularity of National Parks also allows for more employment opportunities of both indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

It is not only the income generated by visitation that makes National Parks important to the economy but also a variety of potential ecosystem services. Ecosystem services benefits include catchment protection, water production, protection of soil stability, climatic controls, carbon sinks, genetic resources, pollination of economic species, habitat for economically important species such as insectivorous birds and the protection of hatcheries of commercial aquatic species (Beattie, Commercial Exploration of Biodiversity, 1995).

Overall, National Parks are an important and valuable resource for scientists, educators and the community due to the variety of aesthetic, recreational and economic uses they offer.

SALTON SEA----------------
For decades, the Coachella Valley’s most notable leaders have pledged to secure the money and political influence that’s needed to revitalize the Salton Sea.

They’ve conducted countless studies. They’ve touted their concerns in well-publicized news conferences. And, on occasion, they’ve secured funding that was supposed to kick-start the effort.

But as the clock ticks down to a massive water transfer that will speed up the sea’s demise, even the most ardent restoration advocates admit they haven’t made the progress they hoped to have made on an estimated $9 billion fix — the state’s preferred plan.

“The price tag is so enormous. It took a long time for a lot of people to come into the same conclusion that the federal government and the state government aren’t in a position to fix it,” said Riverside County Supervisor John Benoit, a member of the local Salton Sea Authority who also worked on sea-related issues during his seven years in the state Legislature.

“There was never any realistic possibility. There was some hope, maybe, at the state level. ... But when the state went belly-up financially, that option is off the table.”

Concerns over the shrinking Salton Sea have taken on renewed importance in recent weeks after the state’s largest lake released an unwelcome odor across Southern California.

Experts for years have warned such smells and toxic dust will become the norm if nothing is done to save the dying sea. A water transfer deal scheduled for 2018 will cause it to shrink at an even faster pace.

That gives elected leaders about five years until the sea’s death accelerates.

Rep. Mary Bono Mack is no stranger to the sea’s battle.

In 1998, the same year she was first elected, the Palm Springs Republican joined House Speaker Newt Gingrich at the sea where federal leaders pledged to get something done.

Congress passed the Salton Sea Reclamation Act of 1998 that directed the Secretary of the Interior to study options for managing the salinity and elevation at the sea. But by 2003, the authority over the sea was shifted to the state of California.


Sincerely,