Faites respecter la loi contre l'exploitation sexuelle

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Anita Kanitz
2 years ago
"A woman reading Playboy feels a little like a Jew reading a Nazi manual." - Gloria Steinem
People who believe that porn is liberating for women (idiotic, but there are women like this) should call themselves ‘pornists’ or some other word. They are not feminists. Period. - Krista Matthews, Getting There, in Merge July 2001
Pornography is more than just sexual fantasy. It's cultural sexual enslavement and sexual humilation of all females.It is crucial to understand pornography as a form of violence against women. ... of the most heinous cases of sexual violence, rape and murder.
Anita Kanitz, 2019

We don’t have a problem with pornography, unless, of course, it doesn’t turn us on. With X-rated movies available for rent at every local video store and Hooters considred a family restaurant, we realize that American porn culture is here to stay. So, rather than trying to rid the world of sexual images we think are negative, as some of our sisters have done, we’re far more interested in encouraging women to explore porn, to find out whether it gets them hot or merely bothered. This is not to say that we don’t see most of the currently available porn as ruthlessly sexist…. the fact is, the current crop of available porn has very little in it to appeal to women… While the female market for fuck films is still far less than that of men, it’s a central tenet of our version of feminism to acknowledge that it exists at all. - Marcelle Karp & Debbie Stoller, Bust Guide to the New Girl Order (1999)

Pornography has been so thickly glossed over with the patina of chic these days in the name of verbal freedom and sophisication… Part of the problem is that those who traditionally have been the most vigorous opponents of porn are often those same people who shudder at the explicit mention of any sexual subject… There can be no equality in porn, no female equivalent, no turning of the tables in the name of bawdy fun. Pornography, like rape, is a male invention, desgined to dehumanize women… Pornography is the undiluted essence of anti-female propoganda. - Susan Brownmiller, Against Our Will (1975)

I find pornography disturbing, chilling - even sometimes physically disgusting. Must I then be a killjoy, a frustrated prude, secretly longing to write articles on porn so that I can sneak a look while publicly tutting? I have been, and am still, confused by the distance between my reactions to pornography and the debates carried out in the press about it. Mary Whitehouse and the Festival of Light seem as opposed to what I want for the word as do pornographers… I don’t want to choose between Mary Whitehouse and the producers of High Society, between two equally unacceptable alternatives - between censoring all mention of sex through vaguely-worded laws that will be applied by men, and allowing pornography to invade my life at an ever-increasing rate, on Radio One and in packets of bubblegum, and even in the radical press. - Ruth Wallsgrove, in Spare Rib 1977, Spare Rib Reader (1982)

Pornography is the theory, and rape the practice. - Robin Morgan, Theory and Practice: Pornography and Rape, 1974, The Word of a Woman (1993)

Anti pornography activists see the issue not as a matter of speech but as a matter of harm and believe that pornogrphy is a kind of ‘collective defamation’. They are often called censors, but what they primarily seek are financial damages for women who can prove in court that they have been harmed by pornography. Their opponents, the anti-censorshipo activists, see then pornography issue as a diversion from women’s material problenms, and a potential threat to women’s own freedom of speech and secual expression. But feminists divided on the issue are rarely able to listen to each other. Says [Patricia] Ireland, they ‘cannot even agree to diagree’… My own sense…is that consuming for one’s own pleasure a product made out of a stanger’s need to exchange his or her sexuality for money - as opposed to enjoying a sexual image made out of someone’s free desire to express herself and create communication out of her erotic life - causes an indefinable but palpable abrasion of the soul. If we consume material whose conditions of manufacture are unknown to us, but that might be unsafe or painful for those involved in it, we hurt ourselves; we throw off our ethical equilibrium in some unquantifiable way. - Naomi Wolf, Fire with Fire (1994)

I think a lot of leading free-speech feminists who are against the censorship of pornography because they believe in the First Amendement are actually reluctant to admit that they like X-rated movies and dirty magazines themselves: it’s not that they don’t want to live in a world that bans pornography, but rather that they don’t want to live without pornography, period. Even right-thinking chicks have dirty minds full of impure thoughts. - Elizabeth Wurtzel, Bitch (1998)

When pornography is… normal, a whole population of men is primed to dehumanise women and to enjoy inflicting assault sexually… Pornography is the perfect preparation - motivator and instruction manual in one - for… sexual atrocities. - Catharine MacKinnon, Ms., July/Aug 1993, p.28

In the United States, pornography has become the central issue that feminists do battle on. But it is more important to make sure that real abuse and violence and coercion do not go unpunished. Pornography hurts because we feel powerless to prevent real abuse; if we could consume it in an equal environment, would it frighten us in the same way? In many ways, women need pornogrpahy; they need a society that is frank and free in words and images and in which they can talk about their bodies and experiences without becoming social outcasts. It is telling that societies in which pornography is not at all acceptable also fail to accept free movement or rational dress for women…one survey found a strong correlation between the consumpton and availability of pornography, and women’s equality, measured by 24 indicators of economic, political and legal equality. So pornography and equality may go hand in hand in more tolerant, open societies…Even when society is more equal, pornography will not just wither away. - Natasha Walter, The New Feminism (1998)

…there is a difference between feeling and action that MacKinnon fails to see: namely, the difference betwen getting turned on by images of domination, and getting turned on by such images and then raping people…. although I may have similar sexual responses, I am not going to rape or brutalise anyone. - Donna Minkowitz, Giving it Up, in To Be Real (1995)

Don’t even get me started on [Catharine] MacKinnon….Now I’d just look at her and shake my head and go, “tsk tsk tsk,” and say, “You know what, I’m really sorry you are that bitter and angry,” cuz that’s what it is. It’s her fuel. It’s what drives her. It’s not that she is not smart, but I do believe she is deluded, and I do believe anger and fear and jealousy and resentment and frustration and out-and-out prudery are what drive her, are her motivating forces…MacKinnon really does feel like she is helping women, while at the same time, she and Dworkin and their ilk silence women. They won’t listen to our stories, our truths. - Nina Hartley (porn star) interviewed in Bust Guide to the New Girl Order (1999)

I can’t tell you how surrealistic it is to find myself and others called “puritanical,” “the new Victorians,” or “anti-sex” for the same views that got us condemned as “sexual libertarians” and “immoral women” until a few years ago. Women and men who oppose pornography for its normalisation of violence will have to fight hard if we’re going to avoid the suffragists’ fate of being recorded in history as boring, asexual bluestockings…Depictions of mutual pleasure and the sexualisation of equlaity are so rare that pornographers seem to have the franchise on sex. They can get away with claiming that to oppose pornography is to oppose sex… The answer to pornography lies not only in exposing it as an institution, but making sure that individuals who are drawn to it, but who are not hurting others, don’t feel condemned. It’s partly the feeling of being personally accused that has caused some women, including some feminists, to defend pornography. - Gloria Steinem, preface to Outrageous Acts and Everday Rebellions (2nd edn, 1995)

Years ago, few women were upset about pornography. Sadistic porn was rare. Only educated men read the Marquis de Sade or “The Story of O…” Those were days of innocence… after the male “sexual revolution,” pornography changed, growing far more widespread and moving from books to film to videos… it began to portray children as well as women… In the late 1960s, pornography reached staggering depths of violence, hatred, and cruelty. Films featured lynching, mainly of Asian women; it is belieived that the actresses in some “snuff” films were actually killed to make the film: mutilation and murder tilted men into orgasm. - Marilyn French, The War Against Women (1992)

Sex in advertising is pornographic because it dehumanizes and objectifies people, especially women, and because it fetishizes products, imbues them with an erotic charge - which dooms us to disappointment since products never can fulfill our sexual desires or meet our emotional needs. The poses and postures of advertising are often borrowed from pornography, as are many of the themes, such as bondage, sadomasochiam, and the sexual exploitation of children… Pornography is more dangerously mainstream when its glorification of rape and violence shows uo in mass media, in films and television shows, in comedy and music videos, and in advertising. - Jean Kilbourne, Can’t Buy My Love (1999)

"Because women's work is never done and is underpaid or unpaid or boring or repetitious and we're the first to get fired and what we look like is more important than what we do and if we get raped it's our fault and if we get beaten we must have provoked it and if we raise our voices we're nagging bitches and if we enjoy sex we're nymphos and if we don't we're frigid and if we love women it's because we can't get a "real" man and if we ask our doctor too many questions we're neurotic and/or pushy and if we expect childcare we're selfish and if we stand up for our rights we're aggressive and "unfeminine" and if we don't we're typical weak females and if we want to get married we're out to trap a man and if we don't we're unnatural and because we still can't get an adequate safe contraceptive but men can walk on the moon and if we can't cope or don't want a pregnancy we're made to feel guilty about abortion and...for lots of other reasons we are part of the women's liberation movement." - Author unknown, quoted in The Torch, 14 September 1987.

"Scratch most feminists and underneath there is a woman who longs to be a sex object. The difference is that is not all she wants to be." - Betty Rollin.

books against pornography:

Child Pornography: Crime, Computers and Society by Ian O'Donnell (Author), Claire Milner (Author) :
This book explores the enduring appeal of child pornography and its ramifications for criminal justice systems around the world. It is based on an extensive review of academic literature and newspaper coverage, a trawl of websites frequented by those with a sexual interest in children, a survey of how police investigate these offences, examination of prosecutors' decisions, and interviews with judges.

It provides a framework for understanding the contemporary nature of this problem, especially the harms it causes, its intimate relationship with new technologies and the challenges it poses to law enforcement authorities. The internet plays a pivotal role. Its sheer size, the anarchic way it grows, the lack of any boundaries to its expansion and its disregard for national borders make it a legal environment without parallel.

An unwavering focus on the threat of sexual abuse has contributed to the emergence of a context where routine dealings with children are viewed through a 'paedophilic' lens. This can have the unfortunate consequence of distracting attention from more urgent concerns (such as poverty and neglect), which make children vulnerable to sexual exploitation. In this way an emphasis on the sexualisation of children could be said to aggravate the problem that it sets out to address. The book:

provides a comprehensive analysis of child pornography issues in all of their complexity, including legal, psychological, criminal justice and social perspectives.
presents significant volume of original empirical data gathered from police, prosecutors and judges.
includes new qualitative and quantitative information set against a background of shifting international developments. The analysis is explicitly comparative.
draws on a variety of sources including support groups for paedophiles, newspaper coverage of court cases involving child pornography, victim testimony and police operations.

Silent Victim: Growing up in a Child Porn Ring by Timmy Fielding (Author):
Little Timmy is a shy, insecure, nine-year-old boy when he meets Brian Gunther, a third-grade teacher in his elementary school. Nothing awaits him at home except a physically and mentally abusive mother and an absentee father. But when Timmy appears at school one day sporting bruises and a fat lip, everything changes between Mr. Gunther and him.

As Mr. Gunther showers Timmy with affection and gifts, he becomes the friend and male role model Timmy has never had in his life. The teacher has evil intentions for befriending Timmy, however, far beyond simple molestation. As Timmy is unwittingly lured into the lonely, dark world of child pornography and orgiesin which he is tortured and forced to perform sexual acts on other boys and menhe becomes not only a victim of rape, but also of blackmail and deception. Unfortunately, his nightmare is just beginning.

Silent Victim touchingly illustrates one boys shattering childhood journey as he learns to rely on sheer will and determination to survive the horrors of sexual abuse.

Truth Behind the Fantasy of Porn: The Greatest Illusion on Earth by Shelley Lubben:
Shelley Lubben was a porn star. Now she tells the hardcore truth. In Truth Behind the Fantasy of Porn, former porn actress Shelley Lubben rips the seductive mask off of pornography and exposes the hardcore truth behind the "greatest illusion on earth". Her spectacular journey from childhood sexual abuse to prostitution to the deadly unglamorous realm of porn sets, Shelley is brutally honest about her past. But that's not all. Having escaped the porn industry at 26, Shelley now shares her powerful story of redemption offering a message of hope to the entire world. The first ever book exposing the "secret" side of porn, Shelley wants you to know the hardcore truth. Pornography is modern day slavery for thousands of women and the millions of porn addicts who can't stop clicking. But you shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free!

Almost the Perfect Murder: The Killing of Elaine O’Hara, the Extraordinary Garda Investigation and the Trial That Stunned the Nation: The Only Complete Inside Account by Paul Williams:
For over a year everyone assumed missing Dublin woman Elaine O'Hara had ended her own life. But after her remains were found gardaí discovered that Elaine was in thrall to a man who had spent years grooming her to let him kill her. That man was Graham Dwyer, a married father of three and partner in a Dublin architecture practice.
Almost the Perfect Murder details the exhaustive investigation - one of the most complex and chilling in Irish criminal justice history - that allowed gardaí to build a case against Dwyer. And it outlines the twists and turns - both in the courtroom and behind the scenes - during the dramatic trial that followed.
Almost the Perfect Murder (BDSM murder) contains startling new material based on extensive research conducted especially for the book. This includes fresh insights into the garda investigation and background information on Graham Dwyer.
This is the definitive account of the case that gripped the nation by Ireland's leading crime journalist, Paul Williams.

Violence against Women in Pornography by Walter DeKeseredy (Author), Marilyn Corsianos (Contributor) .
Violence against Women in Pornography illuminates the ways in which adult pornography hurts many women, both on and off screen. A growing body of social scientific knowledge shows that it is strongly associated with various types of violence against women in intimate relationships. Many women who try to leave abusive and/or patriarchal men also report that pornography plays a role in the abuse inflicted on them by their ex-partners. On top of these harms, male pornography consumption is strongly correlated with attitudes supporting violence against women. Many researchers, practitioners, and policy makers believe that adult pornography is a major problem and offer substantial evidence supporting this claim.

Violence against Women in Pornography, unlike books written mainly for scholarly and general audiences, specifically targets students enrolled in undergraduate criminology, deviance, women’s studies, masculinities studies, human sexuality, and media studies courses. Thoughtful discussion questions are placed at the end of each chapter, and appropriate PowerPoint slides and suggestions for classroom exercises will be available to aid student understanding. The main objective of this book is to motivate readers to think critically about adult pornography and to take progressive steps individually and collectively to curb the production and consumption of hurtful sexual media, including that from the "dark side of the Internet."

Pornography and Genocide: The War against Women by Thomas Trzyna (Author) :
One out of every thirty five women born is killed for cultural or sexual reasons. In the twentieth century more women were killed for those reasons than all the people who died in wars. Women everywhere live in the higher stages of Gregory Stanton's eight stage genocide scale. Pornography contributes to the peril, whether in the form of battlefield rape films, the rape chants of frat boys, or the massive distribution of violent images on the web and through other media. The United Nations definition of genocide must be changed to recognize women as a targeted group. Pornography and Genocide pulls together the evidence from legal scholars and a myriad of contemporary studies and news accounts from around the world. It is time to face the war against women.

"Pornography and Genocide is difficult but indispensable reading. Trzyna provides evidence from around the world that pornography promotes genocide and is, itself, violence against women. The statistics are appalling and the facts they represent emerge from accepted, often legislated perspectives on women as inferior, usable objects. His carefully documented arguments demonstrate that pornography is a systematic war on females, leading to death of body or soul."
--Karen Strand Winslow, Professor of Biblical Studies, Chair of Biblical and Theological Studies, Director of Masters of Arts in Theological Studies,
Azusa Pacific Seminary

Thomas Trzyna is the author of Cain's Crime: The Proliferation of Weapons and the Targeting of Civilians in Contemporary War (Cascade, 2018), Blessed are the Pacificts: The Beatitudes and Just War Theory, and other books on philosophy and education. Educated at the Universities of California and Washington, he taught at the UW, Ohio State University, and Seattle Pacific University in addition to consulting in the US and abroad.

If you are looking to the authors against pornography, most of them are male not female. There I need no comment to that. I can only say, these men are telling the sad truth about the adult industry and pornography!!!!

Opinion
Not the Fun Kind of Feminist

How Trump helped make Andrea Dworkin relevant again.

For decades now, Andrea Dworkin has existed in the feminist imagination mostly as a negative example, the woman no one wanted to be.

An anti-porn, anti-prostitution militant in the feminist sex wars of the late 1970s and 1980s, she sometimes seemed like a misogynist caricature of a women’s rights activist, a puritanical battle ax in overalls out to smite men for their appetites. Dworkin never actually wrote that all sex is rape, a claim often attributed to her, but she did see heterosexual intercourse as almost metaphysically degrading, calling it, in her 1987 book “Intercourse,” “the pure, sterile, formal expression of men’s contempt for women.” Feminism would spend decades defining itself against her bleak, dogmatic vision.

So it’s been striking to see that recently, feminists have started invoking Dworkin, who died in 2005, in a spirit of respect and rediscovery. The cultural critic Jessa Crispin castigated contemporary feminists for their wholesale abandonment of Dworkin’s work in her 2017 book “Why I Am Not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto.” Rebecca Traister listed Dworkin’s “Intercourse” as one of the books that inspired her 2018 best seller “Good and Mad.” The Wing, the network of fashionable women’s co-working spaces and social clubs, sells enameled pins of Dworkin’s face.

A new anthology of Dworkin’s work, “Last Days at Hot Slit,” is out this month, edited by Johanna Fateman and Amy Scholder. (“Last Days at Hot Slit” was a working title for a version of the manuscript that became Dworkin’s first book, “Woman Hating.”) Reading Dworkin now, Fateman wrote in a recent essay in The New York Review of Books, “beyond the anti-porn intransigence she’s both reviled and revered for, one feels a prescient apocalyptic urgency, one perfectly calibrated, it seems, to the high stakes of our time.” (Fateman, an art critic who used to be in a band, Le Tigre, with Riot Grrrl icon Kathleen Hanna, is also working on an experimental nonfiction book based on Dworkin’s life.)

[Listen to “The Argument” podcast every Thursday morning, with Ross Douthat, Michelle Goldberg and David Leonhardt.]

So what is it in Dworkin’s long-neglected oeuvre that has suddenly become resonant? Perhaps it’s simply because we’re in a moment of crisis, when people seeking solutions are dusting off all sorts of radical ideas. But I think it’s more than that. Dworkin was engaged, as many women today are engaged, in a pitched cultural battle over whose experiences and assumptions define our common reality. As she wrote of several esteemed male writers in a 1995 preface to “Intercourse,” “I love the literature these men created; but I will not live my life as if they are real and I am not.”

Dworkin was unapologetically angry, as so many women today are. Even before 2016, you could see this anger building in the emergence of new words to describe maddening male behaviors that had once gone unnamed — manspreading, mansplaining. Then came the obscene insult of Donald Trump’s victory. It seems like something sprung from Dworkin’s cataclysmic imagination, that America’s most overtly fascistic president would also be the first, as far as we know, to have appeared in soft-core porn films. I think Trump’s victory marked a shift in feminism’s relationship to sexual liberation; as long as he’s in power, it’s hard to associate libertinism with progress.

And so Dworkin, so profoundly out of fashion just a few years ago, suddenly seems prophetic. “Our enemies — rapists and their defenders — not only go unpunished; they remain influential arbiters of morality; they have high and esteemed places in the society; they are priests, lawyers, judges, lawmakers, politicians, doctors, artists, corporation executives, psychiatrists and teachers,” Dworkin said in a lecture she wrote in 1975, included in “Last Days at Hot Slit.” Maybe this once sounded paranoid. After Trump’s election, the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, and revelations of predation by men including Roger Ailes, Harvey Weinstein, Les Moonves, Larry Nassar and countless figures in the Catholic Church, her words seem frighteningly perceptive.

Dworkin showed foresight in other ways. She defended Monica Lewinsky when the young woman was being treated like a joke, and she was unsparing in her disgust for Bill Clinton. She was intersectional before the word was coined. The “closely interwoven fabric of oppression” in America, she wrote in “Woman Hating,” meant that “wherever one stood, it was with at least one foot heavy on the belly of another human being.”

Still, the resurrection of Dworkin’s work and reputation is in some ways quite strange, because her contemporary admirers tend to reject her central political commitments. Dworkin, who’d turned tricks as a broke, bohemian young woman, wanted to outlaw prostitution and pornography, and in the 1980s she made an alliance with the religious right to push anti-pornography legislation. There is no sympathy for such a bargain in feminist circles today, where it’s mostly taboo to treat sex work as distinct from any other kind of labor.

Yet the renewed interest in Dworkin is a sign that for many women, our libidinous culture feels neither pleasurable nor liberating. “Me and my peers, we believed in this sort of fairy tale, that there was a line of demarcation that was very clear between rape and nonconsensual acts, and consent,” said Fateman. “We knew where the line was, and everything on the side of consent was great, and it was an expression of our freedom. But that’s not the experience of sex that a lot of people are having.”

Moira Donegan, the writer best known for creating an online list of alleged sexual abusers and harassers in media, recently wrote an appreciative reappraisal of Dworkin occasioned by “Last Days at Hot Slit.” “It should not be hard to say that heterosexuality as it is practiced is a raw deal for women and that much pornography eroticizes the contempt of women,” she wrote. “It should not be hard to say any of this. But it has become hard.”

Seen from a certain angle, the #MeToo movement — or at least those offshoots of the movement that question the unequal power dynamics behind seemingly consensual encounters — looks like a way of saying those hard things. Indeed, some of Dworkin’s ideas have been reincarnated in #MeToo, and not just because she also sought to challenge oppression by going public with her own stories of sexual abuse.

Think of the woman who told a reporter, last year, about an encounter with the actor Aziz Ansari that she’d come to understand as sexual assault, though she didn’t describe force or threat. Decades earlier, Dworkin created a political framework for viewing such an experience — one most would probably write off as bad sex — as a violation. In that 1975 lecture, she described “presumptive rape” as one in which “the constraint on the victim’s will is in the circumstance itself; there has been no mutuality of choice and understanding.” Consent, she insisted, had to mean more than just acquiescence.
related
More from Opinion on Andrea Dworkin and feminism:
Opinion | Ross Douthat: An Age Divided by Sex
Sept. 29, 2018
Opinion | Kate Manne: Brett Kavanaugh and America’s ‘Himpathy’ Reckoning
Sept. 26, 2018
Opinion | Stephen Marche: The Unexamined Brutality of the Male Libido
Nov. 25, 2017
Opinion | Carol J. Adams: The Book That Made Us Feminists
Sept. 7, 2017

Taken literally, much of Dworkin’s writing dead ends in despair. She insisted on being credited for her hard-earned knowledge of the world, but would dismiss other women’s testimonies — particularly about their enjoyment of sex — that contradicted her ideology. “The quality of the sensation or the need for a man or the desire for love: These are not answers to questions of freedom; they are diversions into complicity and ignorance,” she wrote.

Yet Fateman suggests that it’s precisely because Dworkin lost the sex wars so decisively that we can now see beyond her most extreme rhetoric. “You don’t have to be afraid that Andrea Dworkin is going to take your pornography away,” Fateman said. That opens up space to consider the rest of her work, and the price she paid for refusing so categorically to make herself appealing to men.

“For a woman writer to thrive (or, arguably, to survive) in these current hard times, forgiveness and love must be subtext,” Dworkin wrote in the “Intercourse” preface. “No. I say no.” It’s in part this “no” that women are celebrating when they celebrate Dworkin. To treat her writing with curiosity and respect is itself a way of demonstrating indifference to male opinion. “I’m a radical feminist,” she once said. “Not the fun kind.” She’s back because these aren’t fun times.

The porn and the sex industry, the prostitution and the Escorts, the sex advertisments, the sex trade, even barbaric customs like FGM and child marriage are living by the myth of horny female childs, girls and women and vaginal orgasm. But that is the greatesst lie on Earth, the weapon of patriarchy to enslave all females:
For decades now, Andrea Dworkin has existed in the feminist imagination mostly as a negative example, the woman no one wanted to be.

An anti-porn, anti-prostitution militant in the feminist sex wars of the late 1970s and 1980s, she sometimes seemed like a misogynist caricature of a women’s rights activist, a puritanical battle ax in overalls out to smite men for their appetites. Dworkin never actually wrote that all sex is rape, a claim often attributed to her, but she did see heterosexual intercourse as almost metaphysically degrading, calling it, in her 1987 book “Intercourse,” “the pure, sterile, formal expression of men’s contempt for women.” Feminism would spend decades defining itself against her bleak, dogmatic vision.

So it’s been striking to see that recently, feminists have started invoking Dworkin, who died in 2005, in a spirit of respect and rediscovery. The cultural critic Jessa Crispin castigated contemporary feminists for their wholesale abandonment of Dworkin’s work in her 2017 book “Why I Am Not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto.” Rebecca Traister listed Dworkin’s “Intercourse” as one of the books that inspired her 2018 best seller “Good and Mad.” The Wing, the network of fashionable women’s co-working spaces and social clubs, sells enameled pins of Dworkin’s face.

A new anthology of Dworkin’s work, “Last Days at Hot Slit,” is out this month, edited by Johanna Fateman and Amy Scholder. (“Last Days at Hot Slit” was a working title for a version of the manuscript that became Dworkin’s first book, “Woman Hating.”) Reading Dworkin now, Fateman wrote in a recent essay in The New York Review of Books, “beyond the anti-porn intransigence she’s both reviled and revered for, one feels a prescient apocalyptic urgency, one perfectly calibrated, it seems, to the high stakes of our time.” (Fateman, an art critic who used to be in a band, Le Tigre, with Riot Grrrl icon Kathleen Hanna, is also working on an experimental nonfiction book based on Dworkin’s life.)

[Listen to “The Argument” podcast every Thursday morning, with Ross Douthat, Michelle Goldberg and David Leonhardt.]

So what is it in Dworkin’s long-neglected oeuvre that has suddenly become resonant? Perhaps it’s simply because we’re in a moment of crisis, when people seeking solutions are dusting off all sorts of radical ideas. But I think it’s more than that. Dworkin was engaged, as many women today are engaged, in a pitched cultural battle over whose experiences and assumptions define our common reality. As she wrote of several esteemed male writers in a 1995 preface to “Intercourse,” “I love the literature these men created; but I will not live my life as if they are real and I am not.”

Dworkin was unapologetically angry, as so many women today are. Even before 2016, you could see this anger building in the emergence of new words to describe maddening male behaviors that had once gone unnamed — manspreading, mansplaining. Then came the obscene insult of Donald Trump’s victory. It seems like something sprung from Dworkin’s cataclysmic imagination, that America’s most overtly fascistic president would also be the first, as far as we know, to have appeared in soft-core porn films. I think Trump’s victory marked a shift in feminism’s relationship to sexual liberation; as long as he’s in power, it’s hard to associate libertinism with progress.

And so Dworkin, so profoundly out of fashion just a few years ago, suddenly seems prophetic. “Our enemies — rapists and their defenders — not only go unpunished; they remain influential arbiters of morality; they have high and esteemed places in the society; they are priests, lawyers, judges, lawmakers, politicians, doctors, artists, corporation executives, psychiatrists and teachers,” Dworkin said in a lecture she wrote in 1975, included in “Last Days at Hot Slit.” Maybe this once sounded paranoid. After Trump’s election, the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, and revelations of predation by men including Roger Ailes, Harvey Weinstein, Les Moonves, Larry Nassar and countless figures in the Catholic Church, her words seem frighteningly perceptive.

Dworkin showed foresight in other ways. She defended Monica Lewinsky when the young woman was being treated like a joke, and she was unsparing in her disgust for Bill Clinton. She was intersectional before the word was coined. The “closely interwoven fabric of oppression” in America, she wrote in “Woman Hating,” meant that “wherever one stood, it was with at least one foot heavy on the belly of another human being.”

Still, the resurrection of Dworkin’s work and reputation is in some ways quite strange, because her contemporary admirers tend to reject her central political commitments. Dworkin, who’d turned tricks as a broke, bohemian young woman, wanted to outlaw prostitution and pornography, and in the 1980s she made an alliance with the religious right to push anti-pornography legislation. There is no sympathy for such a bargain in feminist circles today, where it’s mostly taboo to treat sex work as distinct from any other kind of labor.

Yet the renewed interest in Dworkin is a sign that for many women, our libidinous culture feels neither pleasurable nor liberating. “Me and my peers, we believed in this sort of fairy tale, that there was a line of demarcation that was very clear between rape and nonconsensual acts, and consent,” said Fateman. “We knew where the line was, and everything on the side of consent was great, and it was an expression of our freedom. But that’s not the experience of sex that a lot of people are having.”

Moira Donegan, the writer best known for creating an online list of alleged sexual abusers and harassers in media, recently wrote an appreciative reappraisal of Dworkin occasioned by “Last Days at Hot Slit.” “It should not be hard to say that heterosexuality as it is practiced is a raw deal for women and that much pornography eroticizes the contempt of women,” she wrote. “It should not be hard to say any of this. But it has become hard.”

Seen from a certain angle, the #MeToo movement — or at least those offshoots of the movement that question the unequal power dynamics behind seemingly consensual encounters — looks like a way of saying those hard things. Indeed, some of Dworkin’s ideas have been reincarnated in #MeToo, and not just because she also sought to challenge oppression by going public with her own stories of sexual abuse.

Think of the woman who told a reporter, last year, about an encounter with the actor Aziz Ansari that she’d come to understand as sexual assault, though she didn’t describe force or threat. Decades earlier, Dworkin created a political framework for viewing such an experience — one most would probably write off as bad sex — as a violation. In that 1975 lecture, she described “presumptive rape” as one in which “the constraint on the victim’s will is in the circumstance itself; there has been no mutuality of choice and understanding.” Consent, she insisted, had to mean more than just acquiescence.
related
More from Opinion on Andrea Dworkin and feminism:
Opinion | Ross Douthat: An Age Divided by Sex
Sept. 29, 2018
Opinion | Kate Manne: Brett Kavanaugh and America’s ‘Himpathy’ Reckoning
Sept. 26, 2018
Opinion | Stephen Marche: The Unexamined Brutality of the Male Libido
Nov. 25, 2017
Opinion | Carol J. Adams: The Book That Made Us Feminists
Sept. 7, 2017

Taken literally, much of Dworkin’s writing dead ends in despair. She insisted on being credited for her hard-earned knowledge of the world, but would dismiss other women’s testimonies — particularly about their enjoyment of sex — that contradicted her ideology. “The quality of the sensation or the need for a man or the desire for love: These are not answers to questions of freedom; they are diversions into complicity and ignorance,” she wrote.

Yet Fateman suggests that it’s precisely because Dworkin lost the sex wars so decisively that we can now see beyond her most extreme rhetoric. “You don’t have to be afraid that Andrea Dworkin is going to take your pornography away,” Fateman said. That opens up space to consider the rest of her work, and the price she paid for refusing so categorically to make herself appealing to men.

“For a woman writer to thrive (or, arguably, to survive) in these current hard times, forgiveness and love must be subtext,” Dworkin wrote in the “Intercourse” preface. “No. I say no.” It’s in part this “no” that women are celebrating when they celebrate Dworkin. To treat her writing with curiosity and respect is itself a way of demonstrating indifference to male opinion. “I’m a radical feminist,” she once said. “Not the fun kind.” She’s back because these aren’t fun times.

Vaginal orgasms are a 'myth', researchers claim :New study in 2014 claims terms are wrong and need to be reconsidered!
There is no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, a clitoral orgasm or even a G-spot, a new study claims.

Instead, a paper published in the journal Clinical Anatomy says, the correct term should be "female orgasm".

According to the report, the descriptions of female sexual organs are wrong. It claims the “internal clitoris does not exist” because the entire clitoris is, in fact, an external organ.

The study says that the majority of women do not orgasm during penetrative sex and the ‘vaginal’ orgasm reported by some women is in fact caused by the surrounding erectile organs – or stimulation of the clitoris.

Although it is impossible to have a clitoral orgasm, women cannot orgasm without stimulation of the clitoris.
Writing in the study,the researchers say: “female orgasm is possible in all women, always with effective stimulation of the female erect organs”.

Previously, it was believed that G-spot, vaginal or clitoral orgasm were all different types of climax.

The study attacks much of what has previously been written about female erogenous zones, claiming: “G-spot/vaginal/clitoral orgasm, vaginally activated orgasm, and clitorally activated orgasm, are incorrect terms”.

Describing female ejaculation, premature ejaculation, and G-spot amplification, the study also claims these are “terms without scientific basis.”

The truth about the porn industry
Gail Dines, the author of an explosive new book about the sex industry, on why pornography has never been a greater threat to our relationships:
ail Dines speak, at a conference in Boston, she moved the audience to tears with her description of the problems caused by pornography, and provoked laughter with her sharp observations about pornographers themselves. Activists in the audience were newly inspired, and men at the event – many of whom had never viewed pornography as a problem before – queued up afterwards to pledge their support. The scene highlighted Dines's explosive charisma and the fact that, since the death of Andrea Dworkin, she has risen to that most difficult and interesting of public roles: the world's leading anti-pornography campaigner.

Dines is also a highly regarded academic and her new book, Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, has just come out in the US, and is available online here. She wrote it primarily to educate people about what pornography today is really like, she says, and to banish any notion of it as benign titillation. "We are now bringing up a generation of boys on cruel, violent porn," she says, "and given what we know about how images affect people, this is going to have a profound influence on their sexuality, behaviour and attitudes towards women."

The book documents the recent history of porn, including the technological shifts that have made it accessible on mobile phones, videogames and laptops. According to Dines's research the prevalence of porn means that men are becoming desensitised to it, and are therefore seeking out ever harsher, more violent and degrading images. Even the porn industry is shocked by how much violence the fans want, she says; at the industry conferences that Dines attends, porn makers have increasingly been discussing the trend for more extreme practices. And the audience is getting younger. Market research conducted by internet providers found that the average age a boy first sees porn today is 11; a study from the University of Alberta found that one third of 13-year-old boys admitted viewing porn; and a survey published by Psychologies magazine in the UK last month found that a third of 14- to 16-year-olds had first seen sexual images online when they were 10 or younger – 81% of those polled looked at porn online at home, while 63% could easily access it on their mobile phones.

"I have found that the earlier men use porn," says Dines, "the more likely they are to have trouble developing close, intimate relationships with real women. Some of these men prefer porn to sex with an actual human being. They are bewildered, even angry, when real women don't want or enjoy porn sex."

Porn culture doesn't only affect men. It also changes "the way women and girls think about their bodies, their sexuality and their relationships," says Dines. "Every group that has fought for liberation understands that media images are part and parcel of the systematic dehumanisation of an oppressed group . . . The more porn images filter into mainstream culture, the more girls and women are stripped of full human status and reduced to sex objects. This has a terrible effect on girls' sexual identity because it robs them of their own sexual desire."

Images have now become so extreme that acts that were almost non-existent a decade ago have become commonplace. From studying thousands of porn films and images Dines found that the most popular acts depicted in internet porn include vaginal, oral and anal penetration by three or more men at the same time; double anal; double vaginal; a female gagging from having a penis thrust into her throat; and ejaculation in a woman's face, eyes and mouth.

"To think that so many men hate women to the degree that they can get aroused by such vile images is quite profound," says Dines. "Pornography is the perfect propaganda piece for patriarchy. In nothing else is their hatred of us quite as clear."

Born in Manchester, Dines moved to Israel in 1980, aged 22, and soon became involved in the women's movement. An event organised by the feminist consciousness-raising group Women against Pornography in Haifa – in which pornography was shown – changed her life forever. "I was astounded that men could either make such a thing or want to look at it," she says. From then on, she knew she had to campaign about the issue.

There were two images from Hustler magazine that she found especially shocking: a cartoon of a construction worker drilling a jackhammer into a woman's vagina, and one depicting a woman being fed through a meat grinder. "I was newly married and told my husband that night how appalled I was, which he fully understood," she says. "If he had said I was a prude I don't think I could have stayed with him."

The couple moved to the US in 1986, and Dines has taught at Wheelock College, Boston ever since, where she is professor of sociology and women's studies and chair of the American studies department. She is something of a lone voice in academia. Aside from what she says are "a handful" of colleagues across the US, most contemporary scholars are positive about pornography, and Dines thinks this is due to both a fear of being considered in alliance with the religious right and the view that pornography represents and champions sexual liberation.

"Many on the liberal left adopt a view that says pornographers are not businessmen but are simply there to unleash our sexuality from state-imposed constraints," she says. This view was reflected in the film The People vs Larry Flynt, where the billionaire pornographer of the film's title – the head of the Hustler empire – was portrayed as a man simply fighting for freedom of speech. Dines disputes these ideas. "Trust me," she says, "I have interviewed hundreds of pornographers and the only thing that gets them excited is profit."

As a result of her research, Dines believes that pornography is driving men to commit particular acts of violence towards women. "I am not saying that a man reads porn and goes out to rape," she says, "but what I do know is that porn gives permission to its consumers to treat women as they are treated in porn." In a recent study, 80% of men said that the one sex act they would most like to perform is to ejaculate on a woman's face; in 2007, a comment stream on the website Jezebel.com included a number of women who said that, on a first date, they had, to their surprise, experienced their sexual partner ejaculating on their faces without asking.

Sexual assault centres in US colleges have said that more women are reporting anal rape, which Dines attributes directly to the normalisation of such practices in pornography. "The more porn sexualises violence against women, the more it normalises and legitimises sexually abusive behaviour. Men learn about sex from porn, and in porn nothing is too painful or degrading for women." Dines also says that what she calls "childified porn" has significantly increased in popularity in recent years, with almost 14m internet searches for "teen sex" in 2006, an increase of more than 60% since 2004. There are legal sites that feature hardcore images of extremely young-looking women being penetrated by older men, with disclaimers stating all the models are 18 and over. Dines is clear that regular exposure to such material has an effect of breaking down the taboo about having sex with children.

She recently interviewed a number of men in prison who had committed rape against children. All were habitual users of child pornography. "What they said to me was they got bored with 'regular' porn and wanted something fresh. They were horrified at the idea of sex with a prepubescent child initially but within six months they had all raped a child."

What can we expect next from the industry? "Nobody knows, including pornographers," she says, "but they are all looking for something more extreme, more shocking." She recently interviewed a well-known pornographer, while his latest film played in the background. It contained a scene of a woman being anally penetrated while kneeling in a coffin.

In Dines's view, the best way to address the rise of internet pornography is to raise public awareness about its actual content, and name it as a public health issue by bringing together educators, health professionals, community activists, parents and anti-violence experts to create materials that educate the public. "Just as we had anti-smoking campaigns, we need an anti-porn campaign that alerts people to the individual and cultural harms it creates."

"Myths about those of us who hate pornography also need to be dispelled in order to gain more support from progressives," she says. "The assumption that if you are a woman who hates pornography you are against sex shows how successful the industry is at collapsing porn into sex." Would the critics of the employment practices and products at McDonald's be accused of being anti-eating, she asks pointedly.

The backlash against Dines and her work is well-documented. Various pro-porn activists post accusations about her on websites, suggesting she is motivated by money, hates sex, and victimises women to support her supposed anti-male ideology. Salon.com reported recently that the sex writer, Violet Blue, had launched a pro-porn campaign to counteract an anti-porn conference that Dines and colleagues held last month. Dines is regularly criticised by pornographers in the trade magazines and on porn websites and she tells me that her college receives letters after any public event at which she is speaking, attacking her views.

Does she ever feel depressed by all this? "It gets me down sometimes, of course. But I try to surround myself with good things – my students, colleagues, and my family." She says the blueprint for her aims is the eradication of slavery in the US, which was achieved despite the fact that every single institution was geared to uphold and perpetuate it. "What is at stake is the nature of the world that we live in," says Dines. "We have to wrestle it back."

Pornography and intercourses are not made for females, pornograpy and the sex industry is made for sadistic, misogynist men and boys to humilate, assault, rape and sexual murder childs, girls, boys and women. That is the very sad truth, but if you are female or male and speak it out, then you got very sure rape and death threats and bullying shitstorms. The truth will not be heard, but nobody can kill the truth forever!

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Pierre PRISÉ
2 years ago
Je suis au cambodge en voyage et le tourisme sexuel fait de la peine et le dégoute

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helene DUFRESNE
2 years ago
Nos enfants sont précieux.
Agissons pour un monde meilleur

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Pierre CLOUTIER
2 years ago
Je signe parce que j'estime que les maquereaux devraient gagner leur pain comme tout le monde EN TRAVAILLANT UTILEMENT AU BIEN COMMUN

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Chantale Caron
2 years ago
Parce qu'on est en 2019, Justin, Sti!

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Doores Sara MARTINEZ
2 years ago
Je signe contre la commercialisation d'aucune façon du corps humaine.

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Wenceslas DUPRAT
2 years ago
La prostitution forcée est un crime contre l'humanité.

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caroline NAULT
2 years ago
pour proteger nos enfants

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Jean AUBÉ
2 years ago
Je signe car il y a rien de plus néfaste que l'exploitation d'une personne peut importe la façon (sexuelle, mentale ou physique).

Ça brise pas une vie mais 50 vies autour.

Et de grace augmenter les peines car c'est plus payant et moi risqué d'exploiter des personnes que de de vendre de la drogue.

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Sylvie BOUCHARD
2 years ago
L’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes passent par le respect de toutes les filles et les femmes du monde.