Petition Closed

Please help save this innocent dog from becoming the next victim of BSL

Bandit is an innocent Pit Bull Terrier that has been ordered to die, even though he has never hurt anyone or anything. Local authorities want to kill Bandit simply for being a certain breed.

Here is Bandit’s story:
Bandit is a Pit Bull Terrier who was recently court ordered to be put to sleep (aka killed).
It all began in March 2012, when police and an ambulance responded to a 911 call to our home when my older human sister, Jazzmine, committed suicide at just fifteen years old. In the midst of all the chaos, people, and sadness, a police officer noticed Bandit and that he looked to be a Pit Bull Terrier breed of dog at the home. Bandit’s human mother (owner for legal sake), Kelly Jones, was completely unaware of Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) in the Village of Archbold, Ohio and its surrounding areas until during this very chaotic and traumatic time, Jones stated that one of the officers approached her and told her that given the circumstances with her daughter, Bandit’s human sister’s, death that she was to have me registered with the village of Archbold within a couple of weeks.

According to Jones, then during services for Jazzmine the same officer came to our house with a citation for not complying to register Bandit and within two days of this citation, the Dog Warden came out to give his opinion. Jones stated that the Dog Warden basically came out to share his opinion via stories of Pit Bull breeds to convince her that they were all bad. In addition, she stated that while the Dog Warden was at their house, he noticed me barking in the window and said, “those were signs of aggressive behavior" and recommended that my dog Bandit be put to sleep right away, just because he was barking at a stranger through the window – something that almost all dogs do.

After the next few weeks, Jones went and registered Bandit with the Archbold Police Department along with the city of Wauseon. At this time, Jones was unaware what the additional rules were because she was only told that she needed to register the dog and no one told her about any other things that she needed to do in order to keep Bandit by law. So while Jones thought she finally had taken care of everything, then another officer showed up and cited her for not having the proper insurance on the dog. So then before the court date for the citation for having no insurance, Jones took out a $500,000 liability police as required by law. At the courthouse Jones pleaded for more and all information on any other things that could result in another citation because she wanted to make sure she was fully compliant and that there was no way anyone could take her dog Bandit. Jones did not get the answers she wanted in court that day but she did go to the Archbold Police Department where she was given a packet on the responsibilities and requirements of "vicious dogs". Although Jones did not understand why her innocent dog who has never hurt anyone was now being deemed “vicious” simply for being born a certain breed of dog, she read through all the paperwork.

One requirement in the packet said that the dog must be neutered. This was tough for Jones to take in. Understand that Jones had already just lost her fifteen year old daughter to suicide and Bandit had been there for her, helping her grieve and loving her when she needed him most, and now she was finding out that she could never have grandchildren (puppies born from Bandit). While this made Jones sad, just knowing that possibility would be gone, she went and got Bandit neutered because his life is the most important thing. The second requirement was to be fully immunized, which was also done by the laws of the Village. So now that everything was taken care of, there are no more worries so they can finally relax, be happy, and move on, right – wrong.

While some time passed without any problems or words from the Dog Warden or Archbold Police Department and things seemed to be getting back to normal – as normal as they could be given the circumstances – one day, Bandit ran out of the house and ran around the neighborhood. He didn’t hurt anyone or anything, but by the time Jones got home, the Archbold Police Department was already there and they cited Jones for "failing to confine dog" and" not having insurance". Remember, Jones did have the insurance policy on the dog which has been in effect since April 2012. At this court hearing, court cost and fines were given anyways. Over the next few months, there were a couple more incidents were Bandit had gotten out while Jones was at work. Bandit never hurt anyone or anything, but simply would run around. Jones received a couple more citations for "failing to confine dog" and "no insurance" again resulting in additional court costs and fines, which again she paid. Then during the last citation received for "failing to confine dog" Jones plead "NOT GUILTY" to no insurance and no contest to improperly confining me in which the judge set this case for trial.

Jones went to trial on Wednesday, August 28th, 2013 and the result of the trial was that Bandit be humanely euthanized – killed. Jones was last ordered to hand over Bandit by noon on Friday, August 30th, 2013, or a warrant would be issued for her arrest. She has filed an appeal, but her and Bandit need help now.

As an animal advocate and rescuer reading this story, we can all point out some mistakes that Jones has made and Kelly Jones admits that she did make those mistakes – she is responsible for making them; however, Bandit did nothing wrong other than just being a dog. So does it seem fair that Jones and Bandit’s deserve this type of severe punishment – death for this dog who is now just two and a half years old?

Jones has since purchased a big kennel with a padlock for me to be put in to ensure Bandit doesn’t get out again. Bandit means the world to her and he is just a baby. Bandit loves to cuddle, is good with kids and other animals, and has been there for his mother Kelly Jones this whole time - through everything – and he has never hurt anyone or anything – AND he does not deserve to die.

For links to the full article, photos, documents, and more information, please click this link: http://www.examiner.com/article/please-help-save-this-innocent-dog-from-becoming-the-next-victim-of-bsl

 

Please also consider the following in making your decision.

No dog breed should be banned. Breed bans are costly and ineffective and punish responsible dog owners and innocent dogs based on how a dog looks. Pit Bulls are not even a dog breed, it is actually a class of dogs that have similar features and actually include over 25 different registered breeds and crossbreeds (which makes statistics based on breed highly inaccurate). Dogs should be banned based on behavior, not their breed. Labeling dogs based on breed is like classifying people based on their race: it is just wrong!

And while Pit Bulls (which include over 25 dog breeds including all bully breeds) are the most well-known dogs affected by the Breed Specific Legislation, in most places they are only one of many dog breeds being banned, such as Rottweilers, Akitas, Dobermans, German Shepherds, Chows, etc.

There is no good reason for breed restrictions.

“A CDC study on fatal dog bites lists the breeds involved in fatal attacks over 20 years [but it] does not identify specific breeds that are most likely to bite or kill, and thus is not appropriate for policy-making decisions related to the topic. Each year, 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs. These bites result in approximately 16 fatalities; about 0.0002 percent of the total number of people bitten. These relatively few fatalities offer the only available information about breeds involved in dog bites. There is currently no accurate way to identify the number of dogs of a particular breed, and consequently no measure to determine which breeds are more likely to bite or kill” (Center for Disease Control and Prevention Dog Bite Fact Sheet 2008).

The American Temperament Test Society’s Website shows that Pit bulls have a higher average temperament score than even the Golden Retriever (which is considered a great family dog).

Pit bulls make great family pets and great service dogs, as rescue pits that are saving human lives in Search and Rescue and US Customs Service.

Ohio recently considered passing breed discriminatory laws, but after researching all the facts, realized that these laws don't work and chose to implement breed-neutral laws that target reckless owners instead of innocent dogs.

In fact, studies from throughout the United States and Canada show that breed bans have not decreased fatal dog attacks; and that the number of attacks have remained the same or increased.

Any dog can be dangerous.

“A 10 Lbs Pomeranian killed a baby a few years ago... Obviously a problem with that particular dog, not the breed. "The baby's uncle left the infant and the dog on a bed while the uncle prepared her bottle in the kitchen. Upon his return, the dog was mauling the baby, who died shortly afterwards. ("Baby Girl Killed by Family Dog," Los Angeles Times, Monday, October 9, 2000, Home Edition, Metro Section, Page B-5.)"

Breed Restrictions are Ineffective and Costly:

Breed Restrictions only hurt responsible owners, because criminals will continue to break the law, so they will continue to have illegal breeds. And they don’t care if the dogs are confiscated and killed because they do not care about the dog’s welfare.

“A Pit Bull breeder was shut down last year because Pit Bulls were banned in Topeka, Kansas. All his dogs were seized and destroyed, just for being the wrong breed at the wrong place. The man now breeds and sells African Boerboels, a rare breed from the Mastiff family, completely unknown to legislators. Unlike American Pit Bull Terriers, however, who are known for their love of people, Boerboels are serious guard dogs bred specifically as protectors. An irresponsibly bred and owned Boerboel might actually be more dangerous than an irresponsibly bred and owned Pit Bull. This is what a breed ban has accomplished in Topeka” (Pit Bulls on the Web, 2006).

Please do the right thing and allow Bandit to live.

 

 

Letter to
jrobinson@bksr.org, attorneys@prshlaw.com, enforcement@agri.ohio.gov
Please help save this innocent dog from becoming the next victim of BSL

Bandit is an innocent Pit Bull Terrier that has been ordered to die, even though he has never hurt anyone or anything. Local authorities want to kill Bandit simply for being a certain breed.

Here is Bandit’s story:
Bandit is a Pit Bull Terrier who was recently court ordered to be put to sleep (aka killed).
It all began in March 2012, when police and an ambulance responded to a 911 call to our home when my older human sister, Jazzmine, committed suicide at just fifteen years old. In the midst of all the chaos, people, and sadness, a police officer noticed Bandit and that he looked to be a Pit Bull Terrier breed of dog at the home. Bandit’s human mother (owner for legal sake), Kelly Jones, was completely unaware of Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) in the Village of Archbold, Ohio and its surrounding areas until during this very chaotic and traumatic time, Jones stated that one of the officers approached her and told her that given the circumstances with her daughter, Bandit’s human sister’s, death that she was to have me registered with the village of Archbold within a couple of weeks.

According to Jones, then during services for Jazzmine the same officer came to our house with a citation for not complying to register Bandit and within two days of this citation, the Dog Warden came out to give his opinion. Jones stated that the Dog Warden basically came out to share his opinion via stories of Pit Bull breeds to convince her that they were all bad. In addition, she stated that while the Dog Warden was at their house, he noticed me barking in the window and said, “those were signs of aggressive behavior" and recommended that my dog Bandit be put to sleep right away, just because he was barking at a stranger through the window – something that almost all dogs do.

After the next few weeks, Jones went and registered Bandit with the Archbold Police Department along with the city of Wauseon. At this time, Jones was unaware what the additional rules were because she was only told that she needed to register the dog and no one told her about any other things that she needed to do in order to keep Bandit by law. So while Jones thought she finally had taken care of everything, then another officer showed up and cited her for not having the proper insurance on the dog. So then before the court date for the citation for having no insurance, Jones took out a $500,000 liability police as required by law. At the courthouse Jones pleaded for more and all information on any other things that could result in another citation because she wanted to make sure she was fully compliant and that there was no way anyone could take her dog Bandit. Jones did not get the answers she wanted in court that day but she did go to the Archbold Police Department where she was given a packet on the responsibilities and requirements of "vicious dogs". Although Jones did not understand why her innocent dog who has never hurt anyone was now being deemed “vicious” simply for being born a certain breed of dog, she read through all the paperwork.

One requirement in the packet said that the dog must be neutered. This was tough for Jones to take in. Understand that Jones had already just lost her fifteen year old daughter to suicide and Bandit had been there for her, helping her grieve and loving her when she needed him most, and now she was finding out that she could never have grandchildren (puppies born from Bandit). While this made Jones sad, just knowing that possibility would be gone, she went and got Bandit neutered because his life is the most important thing. The second requirement was to be fully immunized, which was also done by the laws of the Village. So now that everything was taken care of, there are no more worries so they can finally relax, be happy, and move on, right – wrong.

While some time passed without any problems or words from the Dog Warden or Archbold Police Department and things seemed to be getting back to normal – as normal as they could be given the circumstances – one day, Bandit ran out of the house and ran around the neighborhood. He didn’t hurt anyone or anything, but by the time Jones got home, the Archbold Police Department was already there and they cited Jones for "failing to confine dog" and" not having insurance". Remember, Jones did have the insurance policy on the dog which has been in effect since April 2012. At this court hearing, court cost and fines were given anyways. Over the next few months, there were a couple more incidents were Bandit had gotten out while Jones was at work. Bandit never hurt anyone or anything, but simply would run around. Jones received a couple more citations for "failing to confine dog" and "no insurance" again resulting in additional court costs and fines, which again she paid. Then during the last citation received for "failing to confine dog" Jones plead "NOT GUILTY" to no insurance and no contest to improperly confining me in which the judge set this case for trial.

Jones went to trial on Wednesday, August 28th, 2013 and the result of the trial was that Bandit be humanely euthanized – killed. Jones was last ordered to hand over Bandit by noon on Friday, August 30th, 2013, or a warrant would be issued for her arrest. She has filed an appeal, but her and Bandit need help now.

As an animal advocate and rescuer reading this story, we can all point out some mistakes that Jones has made and Kelly Jones admits that she did make those mistakes – she is responsible for making them; however, Bandit did nothing wrong other than just being a dog. So does it seem fair that Jones and Bandit’s deserve this type of severe punishment – death for this dog who is now just two and a half years old?

Jones has since purchased a big kennel with a padlock for me to be put in to ensure Bandit doesn’t get out again. Bandit means the world to her and he is just a baby. Bandit loves to cuddle, is good with kids and other animals, and has been there for his mother Kelly Jones this whole time - through everything – and he has never hurt anyone or anything – AND he does not deserve to die.

For links to the full article, photos, documents, and more information, please click this link: http://www.examiner.com/article/please-help-save-this-innocent-dog-from-becoming-the-next-victim-of-bsl



Please also consider the following in making your decision.

No dog breed should be banned. Breed bans are costly and ineffective and punish responsible dog owners and innocent dogs based on how a dog looks. Pit Bulls are not even a dog breed, it is actually a class of dogs that have similar features and actually include over 25 different registered breeds and crossbreeds (which makes statistics based on breed highly inaccurate). Dogs should be banned based on behavior, not their breed. Labeling dogs based on breed is like classifying people based on their race: it is just wrong!

And while Pit Bulls (which include over 25 dog breeds including all bully breeds) are the most well-known dogs affected by the Breed Specific Legislation, in most places they are only one of many dog breeds being banned, such as Rottweilers, Akitas, Dobermans, German Shepherds, Chows, etc.

There is no good reason for breed restrictions.

“A CDC study on fatal dog bites lists the breeds involved in fatal attacks over 20 years [but it] does not identify specific breeds that are most likely to bite or kill, and thus is not appropriate for policy-making decisions related to the topic. Each year, 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs. These bites result in approximately 16 fatalities; about 0.0002 percent of the total number of people bitten. These relatively few fatalities offer the only available information about breeds involved in dog bites. There is currently no accurate way to identify the number of dogs of a particular breed, and consequently no measure to determine which breeds are more likely to bite or kill” (Center for Disease Control and Prevention Dog Bite Fact Sheet 2008).

The American Temperament Test Society’s Website shows that Pit bulls have a higher average temperament score than even the Golden Retriever (which is considered a great family dog).

Pit bulls make great family pets and great service dogs, as rescue pits that are saving human lives in Search and Rescue and US Customs Service.

Ohio recently considered passing breed discriminatory laws, but after researching all the facts, realized that these laws don't work and chose to implement breed-neutral laws that target reckless owners instead of innocent dogs.

In fact, studies from throughout the United States and Canada show that breed bans have not decreased fatal dog attacks; and that the number of attacks have remained the same or increased.

Any dog can be dangerous.

“A 10 Lbs Pomeranian killed a baby a few years ago... Obviously a problem with that particular dog, not the breed. "The baby's uncle left the infant and the dog on a bed while the uncle prepared her bottle in the kitchen. Upon his return, the dog was mauling the baby, who died shortly afterwards. ("Baby Girl Killed by Family Dog," Los Angeles Times, Monday, October 9, 2000, Home Edition, Metro Section, Page B-5.)"

Breed Restrictions are Ineffective and Costly:

Breed Restrictions only hurt responsible owners, because criminals will continue to break the law, so they will continue to have illegal breeds. And they don’t care if the dogs are confiscated and killed because they do not care about the dog’s welfare.

“A Pit Bull breeder was shut down last year because Pit Bulls were banned in Topeka, Kansas. All his dogs were seized and destroyed, just for being the wrong breed at the wrong place. The man now breeds and sells African Boerboels, a rare breed from the Mastiff family, completely unknown to legislators. Unlike American Pit Bull Terriers, however, who are known for their love of people, Boerboels are serious guard dogs bred specifically as protectors. An irresponsibly bred and owned Boerboel might actually be more dangerous than an irresponsibly bred and owned Pit Bull. This is what a breed ban has accomplished in Topeka” (Pit Bulls on the Web, 2006).

Please do the right thing and allow Bandit to live.