Police, Ambulance, Fire fighters require a Royal Commission into PTSD.

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder-PTSD a condition which affects our Emergency workers than never before.

Emergency workers - Police/Fire/ Ambulance-are being traumatised by a system that punishes them when they get mentally sick from the terrible stresses of their job. While their suffering begs for patient care, all too often management punishes PTSD sufferers with a culture of bullying, isolation and abandonment. The system almost treats workers as malingerers in a broad rejection of the validity of their claims. It’s all about cutting costs when no one is measuring the human cost.

NSW Police and Emergency workers are being driven to suicide and abandoned by their employers because any attempt to claim a psychiatric injury caused by the job is unfairly assumed to be a malingerer or fake claim. All too often this results in bullying by senior managers who are focused on their own positions and reaching targets. This often pushes injured staff into even more serious institutional care, costing tax payers far more in workers compensation payments. Worse still, the injured officers are eventually pushed to resign without getting any long term help for their condition.

Emergency service workers want an urgent Royal Commission inquiry into the shocking rates of suicide, mental health illness and other injuries caused by their job. They especially want a probe into the conduct of NSW government private insurers who use ruthless and grossly improper tactics to attempt to reduce the costs of these injuries by lying, bullying and threatening injured workers.

Deborah Bryant is a brave Police widow. Her late husband Detective Sergeant Ashley Bryant suicided as a result of chronic PTSD. A broken injury system caused Ashley to suicide recorded at a 000 call centre.

https://abcmedia.akamaized.net/rn/podcast/2017/08/eot20170814.mp3 

According to the Black Dog Institute there are 80,000 Emergency workers in Australia. Around one in ten Emergency workers show symptoms of PTSD. High levels of stress, anxiety, depression follow. These lead to Emergency workers losing their work, homes, families, self esteem and tragically their lives.

Emergency workers are there to help the public. However their jobs cannot even help them.  

 

If you or someone you know needs help, please phone Lifeline on 131 114, Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 or Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636.