Petitioning Turtle Bay Resort Drew Stotesbury and 2 others
This petition will be delivered to:
Turtle Bay Resort
Drew Stotesbury
Council Chair, District 2
Ernest Martin
Department of Land and Natural Resources
William Alia

Please protect and restore the coastal wetland habitats at Turtle Bay Resort.

Turtle Bay is a coastal wetland habitat for many Threatened and Endangered animals and plants. Recently we have been joined by four Hawaiian geese not seen on O'ahu in the wild since the time of Captain Cook! We also have breeding poplations of Hawaiian monk seals, green sea turtles, hawksbill turtles, Hawaiian gallinules, stilts, coots, ducks, bats, owls, ohai (sesbania-tomentosa) and others listed. Two rare species of endemic bee (on the Candidate List for ESA) are found here. Turtle Bay is a winter home to many migratory birds; bristle thighed curlews, dowitchers, golden plovers, sanderlings, ducks and geese and others- all protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). There are other birds, fish, invertebrates and plants that are protected at the State level as endemic (found only in Hawaii) and native. The exact inventory of plants and animals has not been determined because the Resort's Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement did not contain that information. Recently 660 acres of land here were put conservation but any further expansion would destroy fragile ecosystems that are home for these protected animals and plants. The number of units is still set to triple, retail outlets, roads, condos and hotels would combine to destroy even the degraded "buffer" zones presently supporting these protected species. These fragile ecosystems warrant protection and restoration. Precious populations are being ravaged by mongoose, cats, dogs, rats, mice, and others. Punaho'olapa Marsh is Supporting Habitat for four species of endangered waterbirds. The adjacent James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge is Core Habitat for them. Over 120 species of birds have been documented there. Please put ALL of the undeveloped land in conservation for perpetuity. Let's begin protecting and restoring it. Thank you!


Letter to
Turtle Bay Resort Drew Stotesbury
Council Chair, District 2 Ernest Martin
Department of Land and Natural Resources William Alia
Turtle Bay is a coastal wetland habitat for many Threatened and Endangered animals and plants. Recently we have been joined by four Hawaiian geese not seen on O'ahu in the wild since the time of Captain Cook! We also have breeding poplations of Hawaiian monk seals, green sea turtles, hawksbill turtles, Hawaiian gallinules, stilts, coots, ducks, bats, owls, ohai (sesbania-tomentosa) and others listed. Two rare species of endemic bee (on the Candidate List for ESA) are found here. Turtle Bay is a winter home to many migratory birds; bristle thighed curlews, dowitchers, golden plovers, sanderlings, ducks and geese and others- all protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). There are other birds, fish, invertebrates and plants that are protected at the State level as endemic (found only in Hawaii) and native. The exact inventory of plants and animals has not been determined because the Resort's Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement did not contain that information. Recently 660 acres of land here were put conservation but any further expansion would destroy fragile ecosystems that are home for these protected animals and plants. The number of units is still set to triple, retail outlets, roads, condos and hotels would combine to destroy even the degraded "buffer" zones presently supporting these protected species. These fragile ecosystems warrant protection and restoration. Precious populations are being ravaged by mongoose, cats, dogs, rats, mice, and others. Punaho'olapa Marsh is Supporting Habitat for four species of endangered waterbirds. The adjacent James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge is Core Habitat for them. Over 120 species of birds have been documented there. Please put all of the undeveloped land in conservation for perpetuity. Let's begin protecting and restoring it. Thank you!