Petitioning Illinois General Assembly Representative Don Moffitt and 7 others

NO MORE CHAINED DOGS ILLINOIS


 

YOU DO NOT HAVE TO LIVE IN ILLINOIS TO SIGN THIS PETITION.  WE NEED THIS ABUSE TO END ACROSS THE MIDWEST--AND EVERYWHERE! PASSING IT IN ILLINOIS IS  A GREAT PLACE TO START!!

The dogs pictured here were begging for our help but due to our current laws, we did nothing.  The black dog pictured, Karma, was reported to our officials numerous times, by myself and many others.  I drove past her everyday on my way to work months watching her starve and suffer.  Nobody helped her. She escaped one day and I spotted her---so she is now safe, but they have replaced her with 4 others who aren't...  Help me to help these dogs, and dogs everywhere, that  live their lives on a chain.

 

We recognize that there are some situations that require restraining a dog with a tether, not for dogs to live all of their life on a chain.

Dogs are social animals; unfortunately, many tethered dogs are tied up, isolated and forgotten. They are often not vaccinated or altered. Combining this with the instinct to defend their territory, no matter how small it is, leads to a dangerous situation. By nature, dogs prefer to flee instead of bite. Restrict their movement by a chain and they may feel there is no other option than to bite in self-defense. The American Veterinary Medical Association has issued the following safety tip: "Never tether or chain your dog because this can contribute to aggressive behavior." According to Center for Disease Control statistics, children are the primary victims of dog bites.  March 2, 2013 in Galesburg Illinois, (Knox County) a 7 year old child,  Ryan Maxwell, lost his life due to reckless dog ownership, we can't ignore this any longer.

It is important that the following tethering guidelines be enforced not only for the welfare of the dogs, but for the safety of residents as well.

Dogs should not be tethered outside and unattended to any stationary object by use of a restraint between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. 
The tether used shall be placed or attached so that the dog cannot become entangled with other objects and to allow the dog to roam the full range of the tether. 
The tether must be of a type commonly used for the size of dog involved. No tow chain may be used. 
The tether must be attached to the dog by meansof a well-fitted collar or body harness that will not cause trauma or injury to the dog. No choke, pinch, prongor other chain collar may be used. 
The tether must be a minimum of six feet long or at least five times the length of the dog as measured from the tip of its nose to the base of its tail, whichever is longer, and must allow the dog convenient and unfettered access to shelter and food and water containers. The tether may not become wrapped around any 
appendage such that it restricts the dog's movement. 
While tethered, the dog must be provided with protection from the direct rays of the sun, and at least one area of shade other than the shelter must be provided. 
A tethered dog must be free of open sores or wounds on its body 
A dog may not be tethered outside during periods of extreme weather such as unusually cold or hot temperatures, or when a weather advisory or warning has been issued. 
The following activity shall not result in an offense 
Tethering a dog for a period not to exceed 8 hours as long as the dog is not in danger or a nuisance or does not put the public in danger. 
A person who commits offense be subject to forfeiture of the dog.

Letter to
Illinois General Assembly Representative Don Moffitt
Knox County Board S. Erickson
U.S. House of Representatives
and 5 others
U.S. Senate
Illinois State House
Illinois State Senate
President of the United States
Illinois Governor
We recognize that there are some situations that require restraining a dog with a tether, not for dogs to live all of their life on a chain.

Dogs are social animals; unfortunately, many tethered dogs are tied up, isolated and forgotten. They are often not vaccinated or altered. Combining this with the instinct to defend their territory, no matter how small it is, leads to a dangerous situation. By nature, dogs prefer to flee instead of bite. Restrict their movement by a chain and they may feel there is no other option than to bite in self-defense. The American Veterinary Medical Association has issued the following safety tip: "Never tether or chain your dog because this can contribute to aggressive behavior." According to Center for Disease Control statistics, children are the primary victims of dog bites. 7 year old Ryan Maxwell lost his life due to reckless dog ownership, we can't ignore this any longer.

It is important that the following tethering guidelines be enforced not only for the welfare of the dogs, but for the safety of Galesburg/Knox County residents as well.

Dogs should not be tethered outside and unattended to any stationary object by use of a restraint between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.
The tether used shall be placed or attached so that the dog cannot become entangled with other objects and to allow the dog to roam the full range of the tether.
The tether must be of a type commonly used for the size of dog involved. No tow chain may be used.
The tether must be attached to the dog by meansof a well-fitted collar or body harness that will not cause trauma or injury to the dog. No choke, pinch, prongor other chain collar may be used.
The tether must be a minimum of six feet long or at least five times the length of the dog as measured from the tip of its nose to the base of its tail, whichever is longer, and must allow the dog convenient and unfettered access to shelter and food and water containers. The tether may not become wrapped around any
appendage such that it restricts the dog's movement.
While tethered, the dog must be provided with protection from the direct rays of the sun, and at least one area of shade other than the shelter must be provided.
A tethered dog must be free of open sores or wounds on its body
A dog may not be tethered outside during periods of extreme weather such as unusually cold or hot temperatures, or when a weather advisory or warning has been issued.
The following activity shall not result in an offense
Tethering a dog for a period not to exceed 8 hours as long as the dog is not in danger or a nuisance or does not put the public in danger.
A person who commits offense be subject to forfeiture of the dog.