Justiceforuwa

Reasons for signing

See why other supporters are signing, why this petition is important to them, and share your reason for signing (this will mean a lot to the starter of the petition).

Thanks for adding your voice.

Aderonke Adeogun
1 year ago
This is ridiculous. Everyday there are cases of rape in the newspaper. Is it until every Nigerian woman is raped before justice is served? Where are our Policemen, Judges, etc? Enough is enough!

Thanks for adding your voice.

Anita Kanitz
1 year ago
The kind people treat you shows you what kind of people they are. Don't let the murderers, women and child beaters, women haters, domestic and sexual abusers, rapists, molesters, sadistic stalkers, women killers, girls killers, child killers win! Together we can fight against that and make a change!
-Anita Kanitz

“In order to escape accountability for his crimes, the perpetrator does everything in his power to promote forgetting. If secrecy fails, the perpetrator attacks the credibility of his victim. If he cannot silence her absolutely, he tries to make sure no one listens.”
― Judith Lewis Herman, Trauma and Recovery

When a man gives his opinion, he's a man. When a woman gives her opinion, she's a bitch.”
― Bette Davis

There are many crimes against women, girls and female childs: Domestic and sexual violence, street harassment, workplace harassment, catcalling, Eve teasing, tarrarush gamea, rape culture, mass and gang rapes, war rapes, child rapes, marital rapes, dowry murder, forced and child marriages, religous crimes, honour killings, FGM, sex slavery, women, girls and child trafficking, forced prostitution, rape pornography, online harassment, sadistic stalking, domestic and sexual murder, acid attacks, femicide, female infanticide, daily hate speech and sexism, sadistic and forced sexual practices, lack of freedom, education and human rights, forced dress codes like chador and burqa, victim blaming of assault, stalking, bullying and rape victims,witch hunts, widow murders, executions like stoning for rape and assault victims, imprisonment and punishment of female victims..
Violence against women, girls and female childs - particularly intimate partner violence and sexual violence - are major public health problems and violations of women's human rights and childrens rights..
Recent global prevalence figures indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.
Most of this violence is intimate partner violence. Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of physical and/or sexual violence by their intimate partner.
Globally, as many as 38% of murders of women are committed by an intimate partner.
Violence can negatively affect women’s physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health, and may increase vulnerability to HIV.
Factors associated with increased risk of perpetration of violence include low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality.
Factors associated with increased risk of experiencing intimate partner and sexual violence include low education, exposure to violence between parents, abuse during childhood, attitudes accepting violence and gender inequality.
There is evidence from high-income settings that school-based programmes may be effective in preventing relationship violence (or dating violence) among young people.
In low-income settings, primary prevention strategies, such as microfinance combined with gender equality training and community-based initiatives that address gender inequality and relationship skills, hold promise.
Situations of conflict, post conflict and displacement may exacerbate existing violence, such as by intimate partners, and present additional forms of violence against women.
Global violence uniquely affects the girl child. Although international legal instruments have been in place for decades to protect the girl child, thousands of brutal acts of violence and neglect specifically targeting the girl child can be observed around the world on a daily basis. For centuries, girls who have barely attained adolescence have been forced into marriage, often with men many years their senior. As a minor, a girl child cannot legally give her consent to enter into such a partnership. They have suffered in female genital mutilation rituals. They are traded, bought, and sold across national borders as commodities to be put to use as prostitutes or slaves, or merely to be sold again at a profit. Many girls are even victimized before birth, as technology and greater access to medicine have given rise to prenatal sex selection and selection abortion based on sex. Girls continue to face the threat of sexual harassment and abuse in workplaces and schools. Their lives may be taken for the “honor” of their families for speaking to strangers or committing other minor transgressions. Violence against the girl child has become a powerful and all-too-common tactic in times of war and humanitarian disaster.

Violence against the girl child is perpetrated on every continent, wielded by every social and economic class, and sanctioned to varying degrees by every form of government, every major religion, and every kind of communal or familial structure.

books about:

Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture/Roxane Gay (Autor)
In this valuable and revealing anthology, cultural critic and best-selling author Roxane Gay collects original and previously published pieces that address what it means to live in a world where women have to measure the harassment, violence, and aggression they face, and where they are "routinely second-guessed, blown off, discredited, denigrated, besmirched, belittled, patronized, mocked, shamed, gaslit, insulted, bullied" for speaking out. Contributions include essays from established and up-and-coming writers, performers, and critics, including actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, and Claire Schwartz.

Covering a wide range of topics and experiences, from an exploration of the rape epidemic embedded in the refugee crisis to first-person accounts of child molestation, this collection is often deeply personal and is always unflinchingly honest. Like Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me, Not That Bad will resonate with every listener, saying "something in totality that we cannot say alone".

Searing and heartbreakingly candid, this provocative collection both reflects the world we live in and offers a call to arms insisting that "not that bad" must no longer be good enough.

Rape: A South African Nightmare /Pumla Dineo Gqola (Autor)
Winner of the 2016 Alan Paton Award, Rape:A South African Nightmare unpacks South Africa’s various relationships to rape, connections between rape culture and the shock/disbelief syndrome that characterises public responses to rape, the female fear factory, boy rape and violent masculinities, the rape of Black lesbians, baby rape, as well as high profile rape trials like that of Jacob Zuma, Bob Hewitt, Baby Tshepang and Anene Booysen.

Beyond Blurred Lines: Rape Culture in Popular Media /Nickie D Phillips (Autor)
Beyond Blurred Lines explores the ways that the concept of “rape culture” resonates in popular media. This book demonstrates that popular culture, mass media, and social media are prominent sites for understanding and responding to sexual violence.

Rape during Civil War /Dara Kay Cohen (Autor)
Rape is common during wartime, but even within the context of the same war, some armed groups perpetrate rape on a massive scale while others never do. In Rape during Civil War Dara Kay Cohen examines variation in the severity and perpetrators of rape using an original dataset of reported rape during all major civil wars from 1980 to 2012. Cohen also conducted extensive fieldwork, including interviews with perpetrators of wartime rape, in three postconflict counties, finding that rape was widespread in the civil wars of the Sierra Leone and Timor-Leste but was far less common during El Salvador's civil war.Cohen argues that armed groups that recruit their fighters through the random abduction of strangers use rape—and especially gang rape—to create bonds of loyalty and trust between soldiers. The statistical evidence confirms that armed groups that recruit using abduction are more likely to perpetrate rape than are groups that use voluntary methods, even controlling for other confounding factors. Important findings from the fieldwork—across cases—include that rape, even when it occurs on a massive scale, rarely seems to be directly ordered. Instead, former fighters describe participating in rape as a violent socialization practice that served to cut ties with fighters’ past lives and to signal their commitment to their new groups. Results from the book lay the groundwork for the systematic analysis of an understudied form of civilian abuse. The book will also be useful to policymakers and organizations seeking to understand and to mitigate the horrors of wartime rape.

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town /Jon Krakauer (Autor)
Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, with a highly regarded state university, bucolic surroundings, a lively social scene, and an excellent football team — the Grizzlies — with a rabid fan base.

The Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to the Missoula police between January 2008 and May 2012. Few of these assaults were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical.

A DOJ report released in December of 2014 estimates 110,000 women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four are raped each year. Krakauer’s devastating narrative of what happened in Missoula makes clear why rape is so prevalent on American campuses, and why rape victims are so reluctant to report assault.

Acquaintance rape is a crime like no other. Unlike burglary or embezzlement or any other felony, the victim often comes under more suspicion than the alleged perpetrator. This is especially true if the victim is sexually active; if she had been drinking prior to the assault — and if the man she accuses plays on a popular sports team. The vanishingly small but highly publicized incidents of false accusations are often used to dismiss her claims in the press. If the case goes to trial, the woman’s entire personal life becomes fair game for defense attorneys.

This brutal reality goes a long way towards explaining why acquaintance rape is the most underreported crime in America. In addition to physical trauma, its victims often suffer devastating psychological damage that leads to feelings of shame, emotional paralysis and stigmatization. PTSD rates for rape victims are estimated to be 50%, higher than soldiers returning from war.

In Missoula, Krakauer chronicles the searing experiences of several women in Missoula — the nights when they were raped; their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the way they were treated by the police, prosecutors, defense attorneys; the public vilification and private anguish; their bravery in pushing forward and what it cost them.

Some of them went to the police. Some declined to go to the police, or to press charges, but sought redress from the university, which has its own, non-criminal judicial process when a student is accused of rape. In two cases the police agreed to press charges and the district attorney agreed to prosecute. One case led to a conviction; one to an acquittal. Those women courageous enough to press charges or to speak publicly about their experiences were attacked in the media, on Grizzly football fan sites, and/or to their faces. The university expelled three of the accused rapists, but one was reinstated by state officials in a secret proceeding. One district attorney testified for an alleged rapist at his university hearing. She later left the prosecutor’s office and successfully defended the Grizzlies’ star quarterback in his rape trial. The horror of being raped, in each woman’s case, was magnified by the mechanics of the justice system and the reaction of the community.

Krakauer’s dispassionate, carefully documented account of what these women endured cuts through the abstract ideological debate about campus rape. College-age women are not raped because they are promiscuous, or drunk, or send mixed signals, or feel guilty about casual sex, or seek attention. They are the victims of a terrible crime and deserving of compassion from society and fairness from a justice system that is clearly broken.

Rape and Resistance/ Linda Martín Alcoff (Autor)
Sexual violence has become a topic of intense media scrutiny, thanks to the bravery of survivors coming forward to tell their stories. But, unfortunately, mainstream public spheres too often echo reports in a way that inhibits proper understanding of its causes, placing too much emphasis on individual responsibility or blaming minority cultures.

In this powerful and original book, Linda Martín Alcoff aims to correct the misleading language of public debate about rape and sexual violence by showing how complex our experiences of sexual violation can be. Although it is survivors who have galvanized movements like #MeToo, when their words enter the public arena they can be manipulated or interpreted in a way that damages their effectiveness. Rather than assuming that all experiences of sexual violence are universal, we need to be more sensitive to the local and personal contexts - who is speaking and in what circumstances - that affect how activists' and survivors' protests will be received and understood.

Alcoff has written a book that will revolutionize the way we think about rape, finally putting the survivor center stage.

When Rape Becomes Acceptable: Corrective Rape in Jamaica/Kemone S. G. Brown (Autor)
What would you do if your body had been violated? Would you have the will, the energy, and the drive to survive? What if the person who violated you believed that he was doing the right thing? After all, society had provided him with reasoning for his beliefs. What would you do if someone threatened to rape you and you had nowhere or no one to turn to, no one or system to protect you? "When Rape Becomes Acceptable" deals with the issues surrounding corrective rape in Jamaica. It follows the lives of ten women who were victims of corrective rape and illustrates how each woman or her loved ones is dealing with what happened. Some of these women had the will to survive, not in the sense that they are flourishing, but they continue to live, hiding in the shadows, hiding from society who they really are; the fear of being outed again and being subjected to another instance of "corrective rape" determining how they live their lives. However, some of them were not so "lucky". They didn't have the strength to deal with or come to grips with what happened to them, so instead of having to bear the burden of what happened, they decided to end the pain and the agony as it was much easier than continuing to live. Join them as each woman tells you her story and opens up her life, her scars, her pain, her suffering as she tries to cope in a society that has not only failed to protect her but has also given rise to the violation of her body.

I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope/Chessy Prout (Autor)
A young survivor tells her searing, visceral story of sexual assault, justice, and healing in this gutwrenching memoir.

The numbers are staggering: nearly one in five girls ages fourteen to seventeen have been the victim of a sexual assault or attempted sexual assault. This is the true story of one of those girls.

In 2014, Chessy Prout was a freshman at St. Paul’s School, a prestigious boarding school in New Hampshire, when a senior boy sexually assaulted her as part of a ritualized game of conquest. Chessy bravely reported her assault to the police and testified against her attacker in court. Then, in the face of unexpected backlash from her once-trusted school community, she shed her anonymity to help other survivors find their voice.

This memoir is more than an account of a horrific event. It takes a magnifying glass to the institutions that turn a blind eye to such behavior and a society that blames victims rather than perpetrators. Chessy’s story offers real, powerful solutions to upend rape culture as we know it today. Prepare to be inspired by this remarkable young woman and her story of survival, advocacy, and hope in the face of unspeakable trauma.

The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II/Iris Chang (Autor)
In December 1937, one of the most horrific atrocities in the long annals of wartime barbarity occurred. The Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking (what was then the capital of China), and within weeks, more than 300,000 Chinese civilians and soldiers were systematically raped, tortured, and murdered. In this seminal work, Iris Chang, whose own grandparents barely escaped the massacre, tells this history from three perspectives: that of the Japanese soldiers, that of the Chinese, and that of a group of Westerners who refused to abandon the city and created a safety zone, which saved almost 300,000 Chinese.

Drawing on extensive interviews with survivors and documents brought to light for the first time, Iris Chang's classic book is the definitive history of this horrifying episode.

Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching / Crystal N. Feimster (Autor)
Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence.

Pairing the lives of two Southern women—Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white women—Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women.

Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

Epidemic: America's Trade in Child Rape/Lori Handrahan (Autor)
The problem of child sex abuse and its cover-up is real. A generation of American children are being destroyed. If you think this happens to someone else&;s children and your children are safe, you are mistaken. Your children might be enduring sexual abuse right now while you remain dangerously ignorant. America&;s appetite for child pornography puts all our children at risk. Your children and mine. Whether you acknowledge it or not. This book is a wake-up call about a subject too few people want to discuss. That is, while no one was watching, America has become a child pornography nation.

The Natashas: The Horrific Inside Story of Slavery, Rape, and Murder in the Global Sex Trade /Victor Malarek (Autor)
On the black market, they’re the third most profitable commodity, after illegal weapons and drugs. The only difference is that these goods are human, to their handlers they are wholly expendable. They are women and girls, some as young as twelve, from all over the Eastern Bloc, where sinister networks of organized crime have become entrenched in the aftermath of the collapse of the Communist regimes.

In Israel, they’re called Natashas, whether they’re actually from Russia, Bosnia, the Czech Republic, or Ukraine. Lured into vans and onto airplanes with promises of jobs as waitresses, models, nannies, dishwashers, maids, and dancers, they are then stripped of their identification, and their brutal nightmare begins. They are sold into prostitution and kept enslaved; those who resist are beaten, raped, and sometimes killed. They often have nowhere to turn. In many cases, the men who should be rescuing them—immigration officials, police officers, or international peacekeepers—are among their most hostile aggressors. The worldwide traffic in human beings is already a crisis of epic proportions, and it continues to grow. Victor Malarek here exposes the global phenomenon of sexual trafficking, a form of twenty-first century slavery and a multibillion-dollar industry whose scope has, until now, remained largely unknown. The Natashas is an indispensable and startling call to action to seek out institutional corruption and to put a stop to this heinous crime against humanity.

Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference, and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls/Jessica McDiarmid (Author)
For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The corridor is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has come to symbolize a national crisis.

Journalist Jessica McDiarmid meticulously investigates the devastating effect these tragedies have had on the families of the victims and their communities, and how systemic racism and indifference have created a climate in which Indigenous women and girls are overpoliced yet underprotected. McDiarmid interviews those closest to the victims—mothers and fathers, siblings and friends—and provides an intimate firsthand account of their loss and unflagging fight for justice. Examining the historically fraught social and cultural tensions between settlers and Indigenous peoples in the region, McDiarmid links these cases to others across Canada—now estimated to number up to four thousand—contextualizing them within a broader examination of the undervaluing of Indigenous lives in the country.

Highway of Tears is a piercing exploration of our ongoing failure to provide justice for the victims and a testament to their families’ and communities’ unwavering determination to find it.

Perfect Victim: The True Story of the Girl in the Box /Christine McGuire (Author)
In 1997 twenty-year-old Colleen Stan left home to hitchhike from Oregon to California. Seven years later she emerged from hell, the victim of a bizarre and extraordinary crime.

This is Colleen's incredible true story, told by the determined young district attorney who prosecuted the man who had forced her to endure years of sexual perversion . . . and held her captive in a coffin-like box under his and his wife's bed. A story of riveting psychological intensity and gripping courtroom drama, Perfect Victim reveals the whole truth about Collen Stan's real-life nightmare . . . and the psychopath who enslaved her body and her mind.

We Dont Talk About That: An Amazing Story of Survival/Giselle Roeder (Author)
Millions of women were abused and raped during the final stages of WW II, and while the attitude among many survivors is "We don't talk about that", this woman has found the courage to place her memories on record.

Growing up in a rural village in Pomerania, Gila's tranquil life turned tragic when the fighting approached her neighborhood. Her father was captured and taken to Siberia while she and her family became displaced persons and joined the trek of thousands "on the road to nowhere." She was witness to gruesome acts of violence that quickly aged her before her years. She barely survived diphtheria and later, recovering from typhoid fever, she took responsibility for her three siblings while her mother worked. Despite her interrupted schooling through circumstances beyond her control, Gila's determination empowered her to become a Physical Education teacher and successful competitive kayaker. The division of Germany into East and West with its political ramifications caused her to escape to West Germany. Here she was able to fulfill an old dream despite having to face new challenges, including an unwanted affair. Gila's story is one of heartache, courage, pain, love, liberation and reclaiming life....

Beyond Belief: Abused by His Priest, Betrayed by His Church - The Story of the Boy Who Sued the Pope Beyond Belief: Abused by His Priest, Betrayed by His Church – The Story of the Boy Who Sued the Pope/
Colm O’Gorman
A powerful story of a young man’s shame turning to justice, demonstrating that – whatever our past hurts – there is hope for the future if we are prepared to stand for truth.

Male On Male Rape/Michael Scarce (Author)
A groundbreaking examination of a vastly unrecognized though widely prevalent form of violence. Male on Male Rape shatters the silence and offers concrete strategies for prevention and recovery.
Rape, no matter what sex the victim, is a horrid affair. There is much more support for female victims; males often go untreated and suffer accordingly.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Ohimai Ohio
1 year ago
I do not condone anything like this.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Marcel Aliakwe
1 year ago
I’m signing because I demand justice for Uwa

Thanks for adding your voice.

Divine Vincent
1 year ago
I'm tired. We are all tired. We need to know that the world is safe for the girl child. #SAYNOTORAPE #WEDEMANDJUSTICE

Thanks for adding your voice.

Chioma Onwubuyah
1 year ago
Death penalty for Rapists. They deserve it.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Victoria Clement
1 year ago
I’m fed up with these beasts getting a free pass. I’m tired of hearing everyday that another person has been scarred for life because of one person that doesn’t understand the meaning of NO. A gruesome penalty should be given to these rapists! We’re tired. A child’s concern should be their academics not how to protect themselves from predators. Our women and children aren’t safe. And it’s not because of clothing. It’s high time we stopped victim blaming and focus on the actual problem here: the rapists. PLEASE DO SOMETHING!!! Justice must be served please! Not just for Uwa, but for the numerous women and children (boys and girls) that have suffered this.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Goodwill Happiness
1 year ago
We need to do the right thing..bring the culprits to book

Thanks for adding your voice.

Amarachi Onyeokoro
1 year ago
we need justice for her and every other person that has been raped.