More physical pressings of releases from smaller electronic record labels

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How long do we have until our favorite music gets lost in the folds of the internet?

Talented artists such as Oolacile, SampliFire, Karma Fields, MurDa, MUST DIE!, Eptic, um.., Midnight Tyrannosaurus, Dubloadz, Bleep Bloop, yunis, Holly, Alon Mor, josh pan, DMVU, Agressor Bunx, Phiso, and many more artists from record labels such as Never Say Die, Firepower, Disciple, Prime Audio, Crowsnest, Circus, could be long forgotten within the next 5-10 years if we have nothing of theirs to pass down to a new generation, keeping their names alive.

If we had CDs, cassettes, or vinyl records from these artists, we'd have something to pass down to friends, family, children, etc. and make sure these artists are remembered. 

It doesn't matter how small the artist is, they still deserve to have their stuff pressed on CD, vinyl, or cassette. Record labels who already are releasing vinyls and CDs, such as Deep, Dark & Dangerous, Liquid Amber, UKF Music, Drum&BassArena, SATURATE!RECORDS, could perhaps help other labels begin pressing their own stuff, and labels who used to do it or have done it in the past (Never Say Die, Circus, Prime Audio) can resume doing it, AND maybe artists who release their stuff on their own (Alon Mor, Midnight Tyrannosaurus, um.., etc.) can get more support from associated labels (Example, Midnight Tyrannosaurus x Never Say Die).

The average cost of a batch of 500 vinyl records, complete with full color jackets, is $2,500-$3,000, which may sound expensive, however, with the recent vinyl comeback, people would probably be more prone to buy vinyls, especially if they are limited edition, so record labels should not find it hard to make their money back. Truth and the Deep, Dark & Dangerous crew have no trouble selling their vinyl releases, and neither does DJ Shadow and the Liquid Amber crew. Record labels could also skip the full colored jackets and do clear plastic vinyl sleeves, or do 10" or 7" record pressings of EPs and singles instead of 12" records.

And, if record labels do not have the time or money to release ALL of their releases on vinyl / CD / cassette, they could only release their compilations, which would still get a lot of artists' names on a physical release. Imagine if Circus Records did a limited run of DPMO, Vol. 1 CDs. Imagine how many artists would get their names on a physical release for the first time. UKF Music and Drum&BassArena of course help many artists that way, and Never Say Die has done the same with CD releases of Never Say Die volumes 1, 2, and 3, but there are still no physical releases of Never Say Die 50, Never Say Die, Vol. 4, Never Say Die One Hundred, or ANY Never Say Die: Black Label compilations.

Here are the release catalogs of record labels on Discogs.com. Notice the lack of vinyl, CD, and cassette releases. And in labels such as Never Say Die, Circus, and Prime, notice how in their earlier years they put their releases on a physical form of media but stopped after a year or two.

Never Say Die Records

Circus Records

Prime Audio

Disciple Recordings

Never Say Die: Black Label

Monstercat

Rottun Recordings

Firepower Records

OWSLA

Crowsnest Audio

UKF Music

Drum&BassArena

Liquid Amber

SATURATE!RECORDS

Deep, Dark & Dangerous

Uplink Audio

Most Addictive Records

Mad Decent

Eatbrain

Division Recordings

Vision Recordings

Invisible Recordings

Subway Recordings

SMOG Records

Chronos Records

Shogun Audio

RAM Records

 MethLab Recordings



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