Protect children from sex abuse

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Every 8 minutes a child is a victim of sexual abuse. The majority of the victims are between the ages of 7 and 13. Children who do not live with both biological parents have a 30% higher risk of being sexually abused than children who live with both biological parents. Nearly 90% of child sexual abuse cases were committed by someone well known by the child. (A step-parent, relative or in-home caregiver) 

Nebraska children are neglected and abused at a higher rate than is occurring nationally, according to reports evaluated by Kids Count, an annual assessment of child welfare. An investigation by the Inspector General, Julie Rogers and her staff verified that there were at least 50 victims of sexual abuse in 3 years just in the Nebraska child welfare and juvenile justice systems alone. Delinquency and crime, often stemming from substance abuse, are more prevalent in adolescents with a history of child sexual abuse. The total estimated financial costs associated with long term effects of child sexual abuse and neglect costs the U.S. nearly $300 billion each year.

34% of runaway youth (girls and boys) reported being sexually abused before leaving home. Many do not report the abuse because even when a perpetrator of child sexual abuse is convicted, most judges allow them to plead guilty of a lessor offense, sentence them to probation and require them to register as a sex offender.

 Currently, the Nebraska Sex Offender Registration Law does not have any restrictions on registered sex offenders. It does not prevent a child sex offender from attending children’s events, limit employment, restrict an offender from entering facilities where children congregate, or refrain them from living with or socializing with vulnerable children. The Nebraska Sex Offender Registration Law can only mandate that the offender register his or her required information under statutes 29-4004 and 29-4006 at the sheriff's office within the required time. 

 Nebraska Senators have obligations that include: contacting constituents, conducting interim studies with committees, and developing and researching bills they plan to sponsor in the upcoming session. A senator is also called to: “Establish state policy by introducing bills to create new programs, modify existing programs, and repeal laws which are no longer needed.” http://nebraskalegislature.gov/senators/senators.php

 Nebraska senators need to modify the existing Nebraska Sex Registration Law so that more restrictions can be placed on sex offenders who have been convicted of sexually abusing a child under the age of 16 so that they are no longer allowed to freely interact with vulnerable children who are now at risk from them. 

 



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