Petitioning President of the United States

Clemency for Timothy Tyler, life for a nonviolent drug offense

388,865
Supporters

My brother Timothy Tyler was just 25 years old when he was sentenced to die in prison for a nonviolent drug offense. He's watched murderers and rapists leave prison while he has no chance of ever leaving. He is now 45 years old and I want to bring him home.

Timothy was a young Grateful Dead fan, who in May of 1992, sold pot and LSD to a friend who turned out to be a police informant. He had never been to prison before, but a judge was forced to give him double life without the possiblity of parole because of two prior drug convictions — even though both those convictions resulted in probation.

Life without the possibility of parole means my brother will never have a chance to live outside of prison walls. It's effectively a death sentence. 

Tim made mistakes when he was young, but after 22 years in prison, he has more than paid his debt to society. He is not a threat to anyone. He wasn't given a chance to get clean and sober to think about the damage he was doing to his life. They locked him up and threw away the key.

But there's hope. 

In December, President Obama granted clemency to 8 nonviolent drug offenders who were serving mandatory sentences for crack cocaine. And the Department of Justice recently asked for Bar Associations throughout the country to send them more clemency petitions for nonviolent drug offenders.

It costs $25,000 per year to keep my non-violent brother in prison for a mistake he made more than 20 years ago.  So far, that is over half a million dollars.  Not only is that not justice, but it's a waste of money.

I need your help to show them that Americans think Timothy has paid his debt to society and shouldn't be housed in a cage at the expense of taxpayers anymore. He should be granted clemency.  

 

Letter to
President of the United States
Clemency for Timothy Tyler

I'm writing you today to ask that you grant clemency to Timothy Tyler, who is serving life without the possibility of parole for a nonviolent drug offense.

Incarcerating Timothy Tyler costs taxpayers $25,000 per year for mistakes he made more than 20 years ago. So far, that is over half a million dollars.