‘Teenage Mental Health’ - are we turning a blind eye?

0 have signed. Let’s get to 500!


PROBLEM

More than thousand people have ended their lives in the city this year. Till July the number of suicides already recorded in Bengaluru was 1,921 which is highest in past four years. 

According to the National Crime Record Bureau the number of suicides in the country in the decade (2004-2014) has recorded an increase by 15.8 percent, with adolescents and teenagers being the most vulnerable.

Recent happenings around the country depict the harsh reality of teenagers nowdays. With teenagers reduced to venting out their stress and struggles in the form of substance abuse, unorderly eating habits and other form of self infliction, a stable and supportive community becomes a need.

SOLUTION

Catch it Young and curb it’

Schools and teachers can help with primary prevention that is before these problems become disorders. Life skills programmes and peer programmes can go a long way to pick these issues when problems start. Shorter the duration of dysfunction better is the outcome.

Teachers need to have guidelines on what is not keeping with normal behaviour and when to refer to psychologists. Regular workshops can be arranged by mental health professionals in school settings.

In a class students can also be part of training in how to support the peers and this will help to reduce stigma.

“I propose the Inclusion of Mental Health Awareness and regular Interactive sessions with a Psychologist/Behaviour Therapist as a part of the prescribed Curriculum in all the (CBSE, ICSE, State Boards) schools in the country”

I need your support! Each signature counts!!

 

 



Today: TrystwithTeens is counting on you

TrystwithTeens needs your help with “Ministry of Education: ‘Teenage Mental Health’ - are we turning a blind eye?”. Join TrystwithTeens and 221 supporters today.