Climate Crisis: How Will You Lead

Reasons for signing

See why other supporters are signing, why this petition is important to them, and share your reason for signing (this will mean a lot to the starter of the petition).

Thanks for adding your voice.

Keshav Lincoln
Jul 20, 2020
I want you to vote to remove trump and Mitch McConnell out of the Oval Office today.

The official government petitions are finally reopen

Flip the senate and take back the White House today.


Government issues:

Government is now reopening all states and cities.

The official government petitions are finally reopen.

Education and schools are reopening all states and cities.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Harriett Emerson
Apr 13, 2020
The Democratic nominee, party and elected officials must recognize and articulate the critical need to change our diets to save our planet and our health.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Keshav Gupta
Apr 9, 2020
Today is final vote to remove trump and Mitch McConnell out of the Oval Office today.


He is my best president for protect and take back the senate and take back the White House today.


The official government petitions are finally reopen

Thanks for adding your voice.

Marcine McBride
Mar 25, 2020
To truly combat climate change, families should have no more than two children, birth control should be inexpensive, abortions should be legal, and fertility clinics should be shut down.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Dan Stevenson
Mar 25, 2020
I love mother earth and she loves us. Let's give her a chance. Let's love her back. It will be worth it.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Deborah Machado
Jan 14, 2020
...because “we the people” have to do something about it!!!!!!!

Thanks for adding your voice.

Victoria Gu
Jan 12, 2020
I've been waiting for the Democratic candidates to truly make this their top priority, because we have ZERO time left to act.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Karen Aidi
Jan 8, 2020
The climate emergency is my number one priority as a citizen. I am a grandmother and while my time left on this earth is not that long, I care about our planet for my children and grandchildren. While it's been expedient to deny climate change, one only has to look at our California fires, the Australian fires, the melting of the polar ice caps to see the devastating effects of animal agriculture on our planet. Please, this is an emergency.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Bruce Preville
Dec 17, 2019
One earth one chance

Thanks for adding your voice.

Anita Kanitz
Dec 16, 2019
Climate change is a global problem. The planet is warming because of the growing level of greenhouse gas emissions from human activity. If this trend continues, truly catastrophic consequences are likely to ensue from rising sea levels to reduced water availability, to more heat waves and fires.” – Malcolm Turnbull

Climate change is destroying our path to sustainability. Ours is a world of looming challenges and increasingly limited resources. Sustainable development offers the best chance to adjust our course”. – Ban Ki-moon

“Anybody who doesn’t see the impact of climate change is really, and I would say, myopic. They don’t see the reality. It’s so evident that we are destroying Mother Earth. This is not the problem of one country or a few countries: it is the problem of mankind. We need to work together to stop this. Otherwise, our future generations will simply disappear.” Juan Manuel Santos

“We are all living together on a single planet, which is threatened by our own actions. And if you don’t have some kind of global cooperation, nationalism is just not on the right level to tackle the problems, whether it’s climate change or whether it’s technological disruption.” Yuval Noah Harari

books about:

Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet by Mark Lynas
In Six Degrees, Mark Lynas sketches out what the real, tangible effects of our planet's warming will be, degree by degree — from the loss of coral reefs and mountain glaciers to, ultimately at 6 degrees, the elimination of most life.

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
Dan Egan examines the ongoing threats against the Great Lakes — which hold 20% of the world's supply of fresh water — and the catastrophic effects of their destruction.

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
In its long, long history, our planet has experienced five periods of mass extinction, each of which dramatically decreased the diversity of life. Elizabeth Kolbert contemplates the idea of a sixth extinction — the result of climate change — and the ways in which human beings are responsible for changing life on earth in a way no other species has.

The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing the Climate and What It Means for Life on Earth by Tim Flannery
Tim Flannery pulls no punches in this call to arms, explaining not only the history and likely future of climate change, but also specific actions we can take to improve our dangerous reality.

An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It by Al Gore
Published as a tie-in with the groundbreaking documentary, An Inconvenient Truth presents high-level climate change research in accessible charts, graphs, and illustrations, as well as incorporating personal anecdotes.

Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta
Earth's landscape — geographic and political — has shifted irrevocably because of climate change, and much of the world is in the midst of water wars. Scandinavia is occupied by a state called New Qian; here, 17-year-old Noria Kaitio is following in the footsteps of her greatly respected father and training to be a tea master. The role comes with much responsibility, including knowledge of the locations of secret water sources — knowledge that quickly puts Noria's life at risk.

The Ends of the World | Peter Brannen
Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions
As we stare down the barrel of our own (man-made) catastrophe, science journalist Pete Brannen takes us on a walk down memory lane over millions of years to examine the planet’s five mass extinctions. With paleontologists as our protagonists, “The Ends of the World” uses fossil records across the globe to autopsy our five mass extinctions and portend our future. While the topic might sound as dry as a fossilized trilobite, Brannen’s wit may leave you chuckling aloud, from Ordovician to Cretaceous — call it rock and droll.

How to Give Up Plastic | Will McCallum
A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time
Plastics are everyone’s problem, and unless we as individuals, governments and companies all share responsibility, we won’t solve ever solve it. In this book, Will McCallum, head of oceans at Greenpeace UK, frames the current state of global plastic pollution and the environmental consequences of our throwaway, single-use culture. Part history, part guide, “How to Give Up Plastic” helps us understand our plastics addiction while giving us practical, ambitious steps to correct it.

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference
by Greta Thunberg
The groundbreaking speeches of Greta Thunberg, the young climate activist who has become the voice of a generation, including her historic address to the United Nations General Assembly.

No Immediate Danger
by William T. Vollmann
A timely, eye-opening book about climate change and energy generation that focuses on the consequences of nuclear power production, from award-winning author William T. Vollmann.

The End of Nature
by Bill McKibben
More than simply a handbook for survival or a doomsday catalog of scientific prediction, this classic, soulful lament on Nature is required reading for nature enthusiasts, activists, and concerned citizens alike.

The Year of the Flood
by Margaret Atwood
In this second book of the MaddAddam trilogy, the long-feared waterless flood has occurred, altering Earth as we know it and obliterating most human life except for a few survivors.

The Whale Warriors: The Battle at the Bottom of the World to Save the Planet's Largest Mammals by Peter Heller (Author)
For the crew of the eco-pirate ship the Farley Mowat, any day saving a whale is a good day to die. In The Whale Warriors, veteran adventure writer Peter Heller takes us on a hair-raising journey with a vigilante crew on their mission to stop illegal Japanese whaling in the stormy, remote seas off the forbidding shores of Antarctica. The Farley is the flagship of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and captained by its founder, the radical environmental enforcer Paul Watson. The Japanese, who are hunting endangered whales in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary, in violation of several international laws, know he means business: Watson has sunk eight whaling ships to the bottom of the sea.

For two months, Heller was aboard the vegan attack vessel as it stalked the Japanese whaling fleet through the howling gales and treacherous ice off the pristine Antarctic coast. The ship is all black, flies under a Jolly Roger, and is outfitted with a helicopter, fast assault Zodiacs, and a seven-foot blade attached to the bow, called the can opener.

As Watson and his crew see it, the plight of the whales is also about the larger crisis of the oceans and the eleventh hour of life as we know it on Earth. The exploitation of endangered whales is emblematic of a terrible overexploitation of the seas that is now entering its desperate denouement. The oceans may be easy to ignore because they are literally under the surface, but scientists believe that the world's oceans are on the verge of total ecosystem collapse. Our own survival is in the balance.

With Force 8 gales, monstrous seas, and a crew composed of professional gamblers, Earthfirst! forest activists, champion equestrians, and ex-military, the action never stops. In the ice-choked water a swimmer has minutes to live. The Japanese factory ship is ten times the tonnage of the Farley. The sailors on board both ships know that there will be no rescue in this desolate part of the ocean. Watson presses his enemy while Japan threatens to send down defense aircraft and warships, Australia appeals for calm, New Zealand dispatches military surveillance aircraft, the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence issues a piracy warning, and international media begin to track the developing whale war.

For the Sea Shepherds there is no compromise. If the charismatic, intelligent Great Whales cannot be saved, there is no hope for the rest of the planet. Watson aims his ship like a slow torpedo and gives the order: "Tell the crew, collision in two minutes." In 35-foot seas, it is a deadly game of Antarctic chicken in which the stakes cannot be higher.

Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity by James Hansen (Author) :
In his Q&A with Bill McKibben featured in the paperback edition of Storms of My Grandchildren, Dr. James Hansen, the world's leading climatologist, shows that exactly contrary to the impression the public has received, the science of climate change has become even clearer and sharper since the hardcover was released. In Storms of My Grandchildren, Hansen speaks out for the first time with the full truth about global warming: The planet is hurtling even more rapidly than previously acknowledged to a climatic point of no return. In explaining the science of climate change, Hansen paints a devastating but all-too-realistic picture of what will happen in our children's and grandchildren's lifetimes if we follow the course we're on. But he is also an optimist, showing that there is still time to take the urgent, strong action that is needed- just barely.
Praise for James Hansen and Storms of MyGrandchildren: "James Hansen gives us the opportunity to watch a scientist who is sick of silence and compromise ...offer up the fruits of four-plus decades of inquiry and ingenuity just in case he might change the course of history."-Los Angeles Times
"Dr. James Hansen is Paul Revere to the foreboding tyranny of climate chaos-a modern-day hero who has braved criticism and censure and put his career and fortune at stake to issue the call to arms against the apocalyptic forces of ignorance and greed."-Robert F. Kennedy Jr.
"When the history of the climate crisis is written, Hansen will be seen as the scientist with the most powerful and consistent voice calling for intelligent action to preserve our planet's environment."-Al Gore, Time magazine

Rainforest: Dispatches from Earth's Most Vital Frontlines by Tony Juniper (Author):
Rainforests have long been recognized as hotspots of biodiversity—but they are crucial for our planet in other surprising ways. Not only do these fascinating ecosystems thrive in rainy regions, they create rain themselves, and this moisture is spread around the globe. Rainforests across the world have a powerful and concrete impact, reaching as far as America’s Great Plains and central Europe. In Rainforest: Dispatches from Earth’s Most Vital Frontlines, a prominent conservationist provides a comprehensive view of the crucial roles rainforests serve, the state of the world’s rainforests today, and the inspirational efforts underway to save them.

Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution by Beth Gardiner (Author);
Nothing is as elemental, as essential to human life, as the air we breathe. Yet around the world, in rich countries and poor ones, it is quietly poisoning us.

Air pollution prematurely kills seven million people every year, including more than one hundred thousand Americans. It is strongly linked to strokes, heart attacks, many kinds of cancer, dementia, and premature birth, among other ailments. In Choked, Beth Gardiner travels the world to tell the story of this modern-day plague, taking readers from the halls of power in Washington and the diesel-fogged London streets she walks with her daughter to Poland’s coal heartland and India’s gasping capital. In a gripping narrative that’s alive with powerful voices and personalities, she exposes the political decisions and economic forces that have kept so many of us breathing dirty air. This is a moving, up-close look at the human toll, where we meet the scientists who have transformed our understanding of pollution’s effects on the body and the ordinary people fighting for a cleaner future.

In the United States, air is far cleaner than it once was. But progress has failed to keep up with the science, which tells us that even today’s lower pollution levels are doing real damage. And as the Trump administration rips up the regulations that have brought us where we are, decades of gains are now at risk. Elsewhere, the problem is far worse, and choking nations like China are scrambling to replicate the achievements of an American agency—the EPA—that until recently was the envy of the world.

Clean air feels like a birthright. But it can disappear in a puff of smoke if the rules that protect it are unraveled. At home and around the world, it’s never been more important to understand how progress happened and what dangers might still be in store. Choked shows us that we hold the power to build a cleaner, healthier future: one in which breathing, life’s most basic function, no longer carries a hidden danger.



The Uninhabitable Earth | David Wallace-Wells
Life After Warming
Need to get up-to-speed on our climate emergency? “The Uninhabitable Earth” may be the book for you. In 200-odd pages, columnist and editor David Wallace-Wells deftly unpacks the past, present and future of life in the time of anthropogenic global warming. Remarkably, Wallace-Wells’s prose manages to convey not only the urgency (and anxiety) of our environmental crisis, but the opportunity we still have to seize the solutions right in front of us and turn things around. First you’ll get scared straight; then you’ll get straight to work.

Losing Earth | Nathaniel Rich
A Recent History

“Losing Earth” explores the environmental decade that never was: 1979–89, when we knew all we needed to know about global warming to stop it. Tracing the political and scientific history of the climate crisis, Nathaniel Rich reports how the public, with scientific backing, lined up to tackle climate change — until a coordinated campaign by lobbyists, corporations and politicians cast doubt on the whole thing. We all know what happened next. To understand how we got to where we are, we must look to the shortcomings of our past. “Losing Earth” does just that.

Salvage the Bones | Jesmyn Ward

Facts and figures may drive policy, but they rarely stir emotion with the strength that pure human storytelling can do. “Salvage the Bones” is the one work of fiction on this list, but author Jesmyn Ward comes from a place of enormous truth to tell the story of the Batiste family — bolstered by community, defined by pride and threatened by extreme heat and the battering of ever-stronger hurricanes. Like the book’s protagonist, 15-year-old Esch, Ward grew up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and lived through Hurricane Katrina, a category-5 hurricane that pummeled communities already made vulnerable by wetland degradation, local land subsistence and flooding. Ward’s prose rises above the cut-and-dried news coverage of the time to tell the story with a dignity and intensity that demonstrates all that we can create together and all that we stand to lose by climate change.

Where the Water Goes | David Owen
Life and Death Along the Colorado River

The Colorado River provides water for nearly 40 million people, but with climate change and booming populations, this river’s tap is close to running dry. David Owen takes us on a journey down this prized waterway, from the snowmelt atop the Rocky Mountains to the dried-up deserts of Mexico. After nearly a century of division by lawyers and politicians, overuse by farmers and cities and redirection by engineers and bureaucrats, the Colorado River’s resilience is waning. We’ve created this mess, but we can also pull ourselves out of it, Owen argues, before the tap runs completely dry.

Last Chance To See by Douglas Adams (Autor),Mark Carwardine (Autor)
'Douglas Adams' genius was in using comedy to make serious points about the world' Independent

After years of reflecting on the absurdities of life on other planets, Douglas Adams teamed up with zoologist Mark Carwardine to find out what was happening to life on this one. Together they lead us on an unforgettable journey across the world in search of exotic, endangered creatures - animals that they may never get another chance to see. They encounter the animal kingdom in its stunning beauty, astonishing variety, and imminent peril: the giant Komodo dragon of Indonesia, the helpless but lovable Kakapo of New Zealand, the blind river dolphins of China, the white rhinos of Zaire, the rare birds of Mauritius island in the Indian Ocean. Both funny and poignant, Last Chance to See is the tale of an unforgettable wildlife odyssey - and a timely reminder of all that we must protect.

books for kids about:

The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk

by Jan Thornhill

Great Auks were flightless birds that resembled penguins. They were prolific in the icy waters of the northern Atlantic until human hunters, egg collectors, and climate change led to their extinction. Unfortunately, many other bird species are on a similar path. “The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk” is a beautifully designed picture book that reminds us how precious life is – all life. Booklist says, “This vivid, fascinating story emphasizes not only the importance of conservation but also how deeply intertwined the human and animal worlds can be. Eye-opening and tragic, to be sure, but surprisingly hopeful all the same.”

The Problem of the Hot World

by Pam Bonsper

The trees have stopped growing. The grass is all gone. The world is too hot, and there’s no more water to drink. When the forest world is turned upside down, how will the animals survive? Five friends – a fox, a bear, an owl, a mole, and a deer – set out on a journey to find where the water has gone. Can they bring it back? “The book has a lovely forest setting with recognizable animals, very interesting and charming illustrations (in perfect synergy with the story), and tells the story of environmental changes in a very simple, friendly, serene way,” says one Amazon reviewer.

It’s Your World

by Chelsea Clinton

“The New York Times” bestselling book of empowerment for kids, written by Chelsea Clinton, includes an important message on the environment. With facts, charts, photographs, and stories, readers walk away with a deeper understanding of our earth and how to act to protect it. “Taking an upbeat, positive approach, former First Daughter Clinton stresses the importance of being proactive and involved when it comes to current events. She includes many examples of children and teens who have made a difference, and each chapter ends with a list of concrete actions readers can take,” says School Library Journal.

Global Warming

by Seymour Simon

Global warming may be an outdated term, but this book from award-winning science writer Seymour Simon is still highly relevant. The vibrant full-page, full-color photographs provide an up-close introduction concerning the facts surrounding climate change.

It’s Getting Hot in Here

by Bridget Heos

Author Bridget Heos tackles climate change head-on in this informative book written for a teen audience. Heos explains the history and science behind what’s causing our planet to warm and details the way humans have played a dominant role in its acceleration. Publisher’s Weekly says, “Well-researched and comprehensible, ‘It’s Getting Hot in Here’ is an alarming, but never alarmist, examination of a critical topic.”

True Green Kids: 100 Things You Can Do to Save the Planet by Kim Mckay (Author), Jenny Bonnin (Author), David de Rothschild (Foreword)
True Green Kids is the one book every home should have for the next generation. This vital children’s title is an innovative collection of fun and practical ways to help kids become agents for environmental change in their world.

With fresh, new strategies and a bright, friendly design, True Green Kids invites the whole family to embark on an eco-adventure through a series of fun ideas that can be applied everywhere from the living room to the local park. Underscoring its message of individual awareness and action with beautiful color illustrations and lively text, the book puts an energetic spin on conservation, making environmental stewardship exciting and empowering for young kids. With a foreword by Clean Up the World Ambassador and National Geographic Emerging Explorer David de Rothschild, this volume brings the core message that you can make a difference to a younger audience in an engaging, educational way. While primarily aimed at kids, the book also encourages the active involvement of parents, teachers, and other members of the community, making it a vital addition to every library, home, and classroom.

S is for Save the Planet: A How-To-Be Green Alphabet (Science Alphabet) by Did you know Americans generate nearly 250 million tons of trash each year? Or that it takes hundreds of years for a polystyrene cup to decompose? Mankind's negative impact on Mother Earth is tremendous and daily bad news can make it feel overwhelming. But all is not lost! S is for Save the Planet: A How-to-Be-Green Alphabet details the many environmental issues we face and then suggests easy-to-take actions that anyone can do. From the particulars of vermicomposting and xeriscaping, to the three R's of responsible waste management, young readers learn how they can be a force of nature in protecting the earth for generations to come.Brad Herzog spends two months every summer traveling across the country with his wife and two young sons and celebrating America's natural wonders. Together, they have visited more than 30 national parks and seashores. This is Brad's eighth alphabet book for Sleeping Bear Press. He lives on California's Monterey Peninsula. Linda Holt Ayriss is the recipient of a silver medal from the Best in the West Society of Illustrators, and has been recognized in the Communication Arts Annual. She is also the author of Sleeping Bear's E is for Evergreen: A Washington Alphabet. Linda lives in Washington State.

Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, & Wetlands by Cathryn Berger Kaye M.A. (Author), Philippe Cousteau (Author), EarthEcho International (Contributor) :
Written by service learning expert Cathryn Berger Kaye and celebrity ocean spokesperson Philippe Cousteau, Going Blue educates young people about the earth’s water crisis and gives them tools and inspiration to transform their ideas into action. With lively photos and practical suggestions, the book helps teens plan and do a meaningful service project that benefits our planet’s water system. Along the way, readers learn about issues such as clean water access, coral reef damage, runoff pollution, trash islands, factory fishing, bottled water, and much more. This combination of academic learning and community service is at the heart of the fast-growing teaching strategy known as service learning.

Going Blue is divided into the five stages of service learning: investigation, preparation, action, reflection, and demonstration. Special sections include a history of ocean exploration with a profile of Jacques Cousteau; an interview with Philippe Cousteau; stories of young people around the world addressing water issues; book and Web resources; and an afterword for adults.

We Are All Greta: Be inspired by Greta Thunberg to save the world by Valentina Giannella (Author);
"Humans are very adaptable: We can still fix this. But the opportunity to do so will not last for long. We must start today. We have no more excuses" GRETA THUNBERG

Follow in the footsteps of the Swedish teenage activist and Nobel Peace Prize candidate in We Are All Greta and join the global mission to save our planet from climate change.

Greta Thunberg, author of No One is too Small to Make a Difference, has directed the attention of adults and her peers alike to issues crucial to the future of the planet, and the heads of even the youngest children have been filled with questions. GLOBAL WARMING, THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT, FOSSIL FUELS - what do they all mean? What are biodiversity and sustainable development? Who is studying the changes that are taking place here on Earth? Which sources are reliable? What action can I take?

We Are All Greta sets out the basic ideas required to understand climate change, explained in a scientific and accessible way and drawn from the most authoritative sources. With a chapter on key words and sites to help you understand the climate challenge and a list of websites to visit for further information, this is a book for young people, for parents, for grandparents and anyone having to answer direct and urgent questions about what must be done to protect our world.

WHAT EARLY READERS ARE SAYING ABOUT WE ARE ALL GRETA

"Very good for young & older readers. This applies to every one of us on this planet!"

"Since we have only about 12 years before climate change is irreversible, this is a very timely book. Highly recommended."

"It is suitable for children and adults alike and I would recommend it to anyone wanting to learn more about global warming."

"Definitely a good place to start when teaching kids about the environment."

What Is Climate Change? (What Was?) by Gail Herman (Author), Who HQ (Author),:
Learn more about what climate change means and how it's affecting our planet.

The earth is definitely getting warmer. There's no argument about that, but who or what is the cause? And why has climate change become a political issue? Are humans at fault? Is this just a natural development? While the vast majority of scientists who study the environment agree that humans play a large part in climate change, there is a counterargument. Author Gail Herman presents both sides of the debate in this fact-based, fair-minded, and well-researched book that looks at the subject from many perspectives, including scientific, social, and political.

What a Waste: Trash, Recycling, and Protecting our Planet by Jess French (Author)
Everything you need to know about what we're doing to our environment, good and bad, from pollution and litter to renewable energy and plastic recycling.

This environmental book will teach young ecologists about how our actions affect planet Earth. Discover shocking facts about the waste we produce and where it goes. Did you know that every single plastic toothbrush ever made still exists? Or that there's a floating mass of garbage twice the size of Texas drifting around the Pacific Ocean?