Sexual Health Education to all Medical Students in Europe

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João Dias
1 year ago
Great initiative!

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Anita Kanitz
1 year ago
"Pornography tells lies about women. But pornography tells the truth about men."
John Stoltenberg

"Pornographers are the enemies of women only because our contemporary ideology of pornography does not encompass the possibility of change, as if we were the slaves of history and not its makers. . . . Pornography is a satire on human pretensions."
Angela Carter

“The valuation of women’s sexuality in pornography is objective and real because women are so regarded and so valued. The force depicted in pornography is objective and real because force is so used against women. The debasing of women depicted in pornography and intrinsic to it is
objective and real in that women are so debased. The uses of
women depicted in pornography are objective and real because women are so used. The women used in pornography are used in pornography. The definition of women articulated systematically and consistently in pornography is objective and real in that real women exist within and must live with constant reference to the boundaries of this definition. The fact that pornography is widely believed to be “sexual representations” or “depictions of sex” emphasizes only that the valuation of women as low whores is
widespread and that the sexuality of women is perceived as low and whorish in and of itself. The fact that pornography is widely believed to be “depictions of the erotic” means only that the debasing of women is held to be the real pleasure of sex.”

“On the Left, the sexually liberated woman is the woman of
pornography. Free male sexuality wants, has a right to, produces, and consumes pornography because pornography is pleasure. Leftist sensibility promotes and protects pornography because pornography is freedom. The pornography glut is bread and roses for the masses. Freedom is the mass-marketing of woman as whore. Free sexuality for the woman is in being massively consumed, denied an individual nature, denied any sexual sensibility other than that which serves the male. Capitalism is not wicked or cruel when the commodity is the whore; profit is not wicked or cruel when the alienated worker is a female piece of meat; corporate bloodsucking is not wicked or cruel when the corporations in question, organized crime syndicates, sell cunt; racism is not wicked or cruel when the black cunt or yellow cunt or red cunt or Hispanic cunt or Jewish cunt has her legs splayed for any man’s pleasure; poverty is not wicked or cruel when it is the poverty of dispossessed women who have only themselves to sell; violence by the powerful against the powerless is not wicked or cruel when it is called sex; slavery is not wicked or cruel when it is sexual slavery; torture is not wicked or cruel when the tormented are women, whores, cunts. The new pornography is left-wing; and the new pornography is a vast graveyard where the Left has gone to die. The Left cannot have its whores and its politics too.”

Andrea Dworkin, Pornography: Men Possessing Women

books against rape culture:

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town
by Jon Krakauer:
From bestselling author Jon Krakauer, a stark, powerful, meticulously reported narrative about a series of sexual assaults at the University of Montana ­— stories that illuminate the human drama behind the national plague of campus rape.

Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, with a highly regarded state university, bucolic surroundings, a lively social scene, and an excellent football team — the Grizzlies — with a rabid fan base.

The Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to the Missoula police between January 2008 and May 2012. Few of these assaults were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical.

A DOJ report released in December of 2014 estimates 110,000 women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four are raped each year. Krakauer’s devastating narrative of what happened in Missoula makes clear why rape is so prevalent on American campuses, and why rape victims are so reluctant to report assault.

Acquaintance rape is a crime like no other. Unlike burglary or embezzlement or any other felony, the victim often comes under more suspicion than the alleged perpetrator. This is especially true if the victim is sexually active; if she had been drinking prior to the assault — and if the man she accuses plays on a popular sports team. The vanishingly small but highly publicized incidents of false accusations are often used to dismiss her claims in the press. If the case goes to trial, the woman’s entire personal life becomes fair game for defense attorneys.

This brutal reality goes a long way towards explaining why acquaintance rape is the most underreported crime in America. In addition to physical trauma, its victims often suffer devastating psychological damage that leads to feelings of shame, emotional paralysis and stigmatization. PTSD rates for rape victims are estimated to be 50%, higher than soldiers returning from war.

In Missoula, Krakauer chronicles the searing experiences of several women in Missoula — the nights when they were raped; their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the way they were treated by the police, prosecutors, defense attorneys; the public vilification and private anguish; their bravery in pushing forward and what it cost them.

Some of them went to the police. Some declined to go to the police, or to press charges, but sought redress from the university, which has its own, non-criminal judicial process when a student is accused of rape. In two cases the police agreed to press charges and the district attorney agreed to prosecute. One case led to a conviction; one to an acquittal. Those women courageous enough to press charges or to speak publicly about their experiences were attacked in the media, on Grizzly football fan sites, and/or to their faces. The university expelled three of the accused rapists, but one was reinstated by state officials in a secret proceeding. One district attorney testified for an alleged rapist at his university hearing. She later left the prosecutor’s office and successfully defended the Grizzlies’ star quarterback in his rape trial. The horror of being raped, in each woman’s case, was magnified by the mechanics of the justice system and the reaction of the community.

Krakauer’s dispassionate, carefully documented account of what these women endured cuts through the abstract ideological debate about campus rape. College-age women are not raped because they are promiscuous, or drunk, or send mixed signals, or feel guilty about casual sex, or seek attention. They are the victims of a terrible crime and deserving of compassion from society and fairness from a justice system that is clearly broken.

Torture at the Back Forty: The Gang Rape and Slaying of Margaret Anderson
by Mike Dauplaise:
The true story of the pool table rape and murder of Margaret Anderson. Left for dead, practically beheaded in a manure pile, Margaret fights for life. But in the end, the single mother leaves behind a son. Author Dauplaise practically makes Margaret blow a breath at readers as he recreates the night she was killed. He then takes readers to the place she was trying to escape back to, her home state of Montana and finally, on the investigative hunt of a lifetime as this America's Most Wanted drama ends with the capture of her killer five years later. Readers will remember the case. Dauplaise infiltrates the motorcycle gang (club) culture of the 1980s to expose what happened to Anderson and why she was just six months away from disappearing back to Montana. True-crime enthusiasts will revel in the detail and the hunt. Vivid. Enthralling. Horrific. Mike Dauplaise has a microscopic ability to see and know the truth as it exists, not as it seems. He presents here a murder story that needs to be told.

When Rape Becomes Acceptable: Corrective Rape in Jamaica
by Kemone S.G. Brown:
What would you do if your body had been violated? Would you have the will, the energy, and the drive to survive? What if the person who violated you believed that he was doing the right thing? After all, society had provided him with reasoning for his beliefs. What would you do if someone threatened to rape you and you had nowhere or no one to turn to, no one or system to protect you? "When Rape Becomes Acceptable" deals with the issues surrounding corrective rape in Jamaica. It follows the lives of ten women who were victims of corrective rape and illustrates how each woman or her loved ones is dealing with what happened. Some of these women had the will to survive, not in the sense that they are flourishing, but they continue to live, hiding in the shadows, hiding from society who they really are; the fear of being outed again and being subjected to another instance of "corrective rape" determining how they live their lives. However, some of them were not so "lucky". They didn't have the strength to deal with or come to grips with what happened to them, so instead of having to bear the burden of what happened, they decided to end the pain and the agony as it was much easier than continuing to live. Join them as each woman tells you her story and opens up her life, her scars, her pain, her suffering as she tries to cope in a society that has not only failed to protect her but has also given rise to the violation of her body.


“The valuation of women’s sexuality in pornography is objective and real because women are so regarded and so valued. The force depicted in pornography is objective and real because force is so used against women. The debasing of women depicted in pornography and intrinsic to it is
objective and real in that women are so debased. The uses of
women depicted in pornography are objective and real because women are so used. The women used in pornography are used in pornography. The definition of women articulated systematically and consistently in pornography is objective and real in that real women exist within and must live with constant reference to the boundaries of this definition. The fact that pornography is widely believed to be “sexual representations” or “depictions of sex” emphasizes only that the valuation of women as low whores is
widespread and that the sexuality of women is perceived as low and whorish in and of itself. The fact that pornography is widely believed to be “depictions of the erotic” means only that the debasing of women is held to be the real pleasure of sex.”

“On the Left, the sexually liberated woman is the woman of
pornography. Free male sexuality wants, has a right to, produces, and consumes pornography because pornography is pleasure. Leftist sensibility promotes and protects pornography because pornography is freedom. The pornography glut is bread and roses for the masses. Freedom is the mass-marketing of woman as whore. Free sexuality for the woman is in being massively consumed, denied an individual nature, denied any sexual sensibility other than that which serves the male. Capitalism is not wicked or cruel when the commodity is the whore; profit is not wicked or cruel when the alienated worker is a female piece of meat; corporate bloodsucking is not wicked or cruel when the corporations in question, organized crime syndicates, sell cunt; racism is not wicked or cruel when the black cunt or yellow cunt or red cunt or Hispanic cunt or Jewish cunt has her legs splayed for any man’s pleasure; poverty is not wicked or cruel when it is the poverty of dispossessed women who have only themselves to sell; violence by the powerful against the powerless is not wicked or cruel when it is called sex; slavery is not wicked or cruel when it is sexual slavery; torture is not wicked or cruel when the tormented are women, whores, cunts. The new pornography is left-wing; and the new pornography is a vast graveyard where the Left has gone to die. The Left cannot have its whores and its politics too.”

Andrea Dworkin, Pornography: Men Possessing Women

“Feminism is the struggle to end sexist oppression. Therefore, it is necessarily a struggle to eradicate the ideology of domination that permeates Western culture on various levels, as well as a commitment to reorganizing society so that the self-development of people can take precedence over imperialism, economic expansion, and material desires.”
― Bell Hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center

“A man hits me--I hit the man a little harder--then he won't do it again.' Unfortunately he did do it again--a little harder still. The effort to hit harder carried on the action and reaction till society, hitting hardest of all, set up a system of legal punishment, of unlimited severity. It imprisoned, it mutilated, it tortured, it killed; it destroyed whole families, and razed contumelious cities to the ground.”
― Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Man-Made World

“When feminist theorizing of prostitution frames the practice as ordinary work which enables women to express ‘choice’ and ‘agency’, and represents trafficked women in debt bondage as simply ‘migrating for labour’, it serves to normalize the industry and support its growth. It air brushes the harms that girls and women suffer in prostitution and makes it very difficult for feminist activists to oppose the construction of prostitution industries as an ordinary part of economic development, and demand dignified work for women. Such theorizing also supports the campaign by the prostitution industry, sex work organizations and some governments to legalize or decriminalize prostitution. For the industry to prosper, toleration is good, but legalization is better. Thus the approaches that feminist theorists choose to take have important implications. The growth of the industry multiplies the harms that are an integral part of prostitution and other forms of sexual exploitation whether ‘legal’ or not. The sex industry cannot be quarantined, set apart from the rest of the society for men to abuse the women caught within the industry in seclusion.”
― Sheila Jeffreys, The Industrial Vagina: The Political Economy of the Global Sex Trade

“Pornography as propaganda, according to feminist analysis, represents women as objects who love to be abused, and teaches men practices of degradation and abuse to carry out upon women.”
― Sheila Jeffreys, Unpacking Queer Politics: A Lesbian Feminist Perspective

“Pornography is not egalitarian and gender-free. It is predicated upon the inequality of women and is the propaganda that makes that inequality sexy. For women to find passive, objectified men sexy in large enough numbers to make a pornography industry based upon such images viable, would require the reconstruction of women's sexuality into a ruling-class sexuality. In an egalitarian society objectification would not exist and therefore the particular buzz provided by pornography, the excitement of eroticised dominance for the ruling class, would be unimaginable.”
― Sheila Jeffreys, Anticlimax: A Feminist Perspective on the Sexual Revolution

“Maleness means war.”
― Charlotte Perkins Gilman

books against pornography:

Making Violence Sexy: Feminist Views on Pornography
by Diana E.H. Russell (Goodreads Author) (Editor),
Andrea Dworkin (Contributor)
, Susan Wilhem (Contributor)
, Van F. White (Contributor)
, Martin DuFresne (Contributor)
, Mimi H. Silbert (Contributor)
, Ayala M. Pines (Contributor)
, Alice Mayall (Contributor):
"Making Violence Sexy" chronicles women's resistance to pornography over the last twenty years. It does this in a collection of feminist articles, including testimonies by victims/survivors of pornography that together make a convincing case for the view that pornography (as distinct from erotica) causes harm to women, including acts of violence. The volume is organized into four parts, the first of which provides vivid and moving personal accounts of how women's lives have been damaged by pornography. Part two gives an overview of the present status of pornography in our society, as well as the raging debate over pornography and censorship. Part three details several interesting and significant studies on the effects of pornography, as well as critiques of some of the most influential non-feminist researchers. The concluding part then describes actions, both humorous and grave, that feminists have employed in their fight against pornography. Some of the contributors are: Andrea Dworkin, Patricia Hill Collins, Catharine MacKinnon, Gloria Steinem and John Stoltenberg. "Making Violence Sexy: Feminist Views on Pornography" will appeal to students and lecturers of women's studies and sociology, political activists, public officials, social scientists, legal and medical professionals - those who consider pornography free speech, and those who of it as obscene, and those who consider it a form of discrimination against women. Women's studies teachers should find it a welcome addition to their required reading lists, and those working against sexual violence may appreciate it as a primary, up-to-date, and comprehensive source and inspiration.

The Secret Trauma: Incest In The Lives Of Girls And Women
by Diana E.H. Russell :
The Secret Trauma remains the definitive argument for the overwhelming prevalence of incestuous abuse. Based on findings about San Francisco, the book makes a persuasive case for an epidemic of abuse on a national scale. In her nuanced and sophisticated analysis, Russell carefully explores the complex variables of incestuous abuse: the changing incidence of abuse over time, the severity of th abuse, the victim’s age, factors of class, race, and ethnicity, and long term effects on victims.In a new introduction to the revised edition, Russell takes on the most important issue to arise in the field since the book was originally published in 1986: the serious backlash that followed the outpouring of reports by victims/survivors, and the controversy over false accusations and “false memories.”

Pornography: Men Possessing Women
by Andrea Dworkin:

This volume presents a study of the damaging effect of pornography and its ramifications on society.

Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality
by Gail Dines:
Professor Gail Dines has written about and researched the porn industry for over two decades. She attends industry conferences, interviews producers and performers, and speaks to hundreds of men and women each year about their experience with porn. Students and educators describe her work as "life changing."

In Pornland—the culmination of her life's work—Dines takes an unflinching look at porn and its affect on our lives. Astonishingly, the average age of first viewing porn is now 11.5 years for boys, and with the advent of the Internet, it's no surprise that young people are consuming more porn than ever. But, as Dines shows, today's porn is strikingly different from yesterday's Playboy. As porn culture has become absorbed into pop culture, a new wave of entrepreneurs are creating porn that is even more hard-core, violent, sexist, and racist. To differentiate their products in a glutted market, producers have created profitable niche products—like teen sex, torture porn, and gonzo—in order to entice a generation of desensitized users.

Going from the backstreets to Wall Street, Dines traces the extensive money trail behind this multibillion-dollar industry—one that reaps more profits than the film and music industries combined. Like Big Tobacco—with its powerful lobbying groups and sophisticated business practices—porn companies don't simply sell products. Rather they influence legislators, partner with mainstream media, and develop new technologies like streaming video for cell phones. Proving that this assembly line of content is actually limiting our sexual freedom, Dines argues that porn's omnipresence has become a public health concern we can no longer ignore.

Going from the backstreets to Wall Street, Dines reveals how porn is affecting our lives and why its omnipresence is detrimental to our sexual freedom.

Ordeal
by Linda Lovelace,
Mike McGrady:
Linda Susan Boreman, better known by her stage name Linda Lovelace, became famous after starring in the 1972 hardcore porn film Deep Throat. She later became a spokeswoman for the anti-pornography movement.

Deep Throat was notable for beginning a brief fad of porn chic; it was also the inspiration for Bob Woodward's name of his secret Watergate source, W. Mark Felt. Boreman later stated that she regretted her pornographic career and was coerced into pornography by her then-husband, Chuck Traynor.

Misogynies
by Joan Smith:
In this collection of stinging essays Joan Smith explores the phenomenon of women-hating in politics, religion, history, literature, and popular culture on both sides of the Atlantic. A fascinating collection from the mind of a scholar, educator, and observer of our society, MISOGYNIES will make readers of both genders wonder more about the excuses for hatred of women we create as a society, why we accept them, and what it means to all of our lives.

In this collection of stinging essays Joan Smith explores the phenomenon of women-hating in politics, religion, history, literature, and popular culture on both sides of the Atlantic. A fascinating collection from the mind of a scholar, educator, and observer of our society, MISOGYNIES will make readers of both genders wonder more about the excuses for hatred of women we create as a society, why we accept them, and what it means to all of our lives.

Sexual Enslavement of Girls and Women Worldwide
by Andrea Parrot:
They are in different countries but share the same hell. Maria is one of 14 women lured from Mexico to Seattle, Washington, with the promise of a job, then held by force in a brothel and required to sexually service men 12 hours a day. Anna is a young mother from the Ukraine who left her husband and children there to take a job as a housecleaner in Italy, where she was put in a barred, guarded house and forced into prostitution. Nadia is an 11-year-old girl in Africa, kidnapped and forced to have sex with a militiaman daily, with a machete ever ready nearby should she refuse. All three women are part of horrific sex slavery that has drawn the attention of officials in countries around the globe. It is not rare; officials say it is increasing, at least partly due to the billions of dollars it brings in for organized crime. The U.S. State Department estimates 800,000 victims, mostly women and children, are trafficked for sex trade across nations each year and millions more are trafficked within countries - including the U.S., Britain, Spain, and the Netherlands. As a Seattle Times reporter explained when Maria's case hit the news there, the reality is that sex slaves for the most part are young women and teenaged girls who come from almost every one of the world's poorer countries and end up in almost every country where there is a combination of sexual demand and money. But they are also in undeveloped Africa, in prisons internationally, locked in forced marriages, or sold to men by parents.



In this book, Parrot and Cummings outline the scope and growth of the sex slave market today and explain the history with various elements - including economic, political, cultural, and religious - that make this trade difficult to fully expose, quell, combat, and shut down. We hear from girls and women around the world describing how sexual enslavement has tortured them physically, emotionally, and spiritually, whether they suffer at the hands of prison guards in Turkey, criminals in Washington, or buyers dealing with parents who sell their daughters for the sex slave trade in Greece, Belgium, or France. The authors also describe national and international efforts and legislation passed or in design to stop sex slavery. Successful countries and regions are spotlighted. Then Parrot and Cummings point out actions still needed to stop the sex slavery trade.

The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm
by Anne Koedt:
The male lies about female sexuality connected with sexual femicide and sexual violence.

Sassy Sonja: Behind the Closed Door of Marital Rape
by Sarah Sewell Wolters;
Sonja Kent is a bright and talented girl who was raised in the home of a domineering, abusive father and a passive mother. Her life is turned upside down at age sixteen, when her father's business fails and she is forced to move from Augusta, Georgia, to Jacksonville, Florida. Her college scholarship gone, and separated from her beloved Aunt Mabel and Grandmother Mary, Sonja finds solace in her music. Sonja does her best to survive in a home ruled by a money obsessed, selfish, and angry father. At First Baptist Church, Sonja plays the piano and meets Walter, the young choir director. She is swept off her feet by Walter and marries him. But rather than finding the escape from her father and the simple life of peace and stability she craves, Sonja quickly realizes she made a terrible mistake. Her husband is sexually abusive and emotionally disturbed. Her life becomes a dual existence, where she publicly pretends to be a happy, newly married woman, while privately she tries to convince her husband to stop hurting her and seek professional help. A woman of faith, Sonja fights for her marriage. But some things are not meant to be. Read how Sonja survives Behind the Closed Door of Marital Rape. Sarah Sewell Wolters began the study of piano at age five and music was the primary method for expressing her feelings. She wrote for political reasons during the Vietnam War and later published a book of poetry. Today she is a senior citizen with an empty nest and a brand new BA degree in technical communications. She lives in Virginia and is writing the sequel.

The Porn Myth: Exposing the Reality Behind the Fantasy of Pornography
by Matt Fradd:
The Porn Myth is a non-religious response to pro-pornography arguments. It draws from the experience of porn performers, recent research from neurology, sociology, and psychology to build a case for why pornography is destructive to individuals, relationships, and society. Matt Fradd provides insightful arguments, including the latest scientific research, on nearly every relevant subject imaginable, exposing the negative impact pornography has on our minds, our relationships, and our culture.

This book addresses the neurological reasons porn is addictive, helps individuals learn how to be free of porn, and offers real help to parents and the spouses of porn users.

Thanks to such new research on pornography's harmful effects on the brain, on relationships, and on society, there is today a wave of passionate individuals trying to change the cultural norm—inspiring others to pursue real love and avoid its hollow counterfeit. Today's younger generation wants a love that is untainted by warped perceptions of intimacy and by selfish desires. Millions are now recognizing pornography for what it is and rejecting its influence in their lives. This book is part of that movement.

The Porn Myth will help readers to separate the myths from the reality about porn, and to reclaim real love in their lives. Matt Fradd masterfully articulates and dispels the falsehoods that have helped to spread porn addiction and sexual dysfunction, and he inspires us to take action against them.

Truth Behind the Fantasy of Porn: The Greatest Illusion on Earth
by Shelley Lubben:
Shelley Lubben was a porn star. Now she tells the hardcore truth. In Truth Behind the Fantasy of Porn, former porn actress Shelley Lubben rips the seductive mask off of pornography and exposes the hardcore truth behind the "greatest illusion on earth." Her spectacular journey from childhood sexual abuse to prostitution to the deadly unglamorous realm of porn sets, Shelley is brutally honest about her past. But that's not all. Having escaped the porn industry at 26, Shelley now shares her powerful story of redemption offering a message of hope to the entire world. The first ever book exposing the "secret" side of porn, Shelley wants you to know the hardcore truth. Pornography is modern day slavery for thousands of women and the millions of porn addicts who can't stop clicking. But you shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free!

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Marie CHEVRET -MÉASSON
1 year ago
so important

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Zahra SHAH KARAMI
1 year ago
Cet apprentissage est une nécessité pour l’ensemble du corps médical.

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Philippe BRENOT
1 year ago
A very important recognition of Sexual Medicine for Sexual Health

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Margrethr Kjølseth
2 years ago
This is do important.It should be as normal as checking bloodpressure at doctors!

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Isabel White
2 years ago
I am a nurse and accredited psychosexual therapist believe medical and nursing students should have improved knowledge and skill development related to sexual health / sexual impacts of illness / treatment.

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Manon Dahler
2 years ago
I had breast Cancer and none of the many docters I had asked how it affected my sex life...

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Frances Dupierry
2 years ago
I feel strongly that sexual health education would greatly benefit not only the students but their patients.

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Volker Moritz
2 years ago
As psychologist and sexologist I see the need in so many patients to address their sexual problems. It can be a sexual problem in itself or a medical, physical or a psychological problem, causing a sexual problem.
I was teaching sexology to medical students and could see how uncomfortable medical students feel to address sexuality in their patients. It is also a huge subject with many overlapping disciplines and a vast body of knowledge. For sure it is a win-win situation if all medical students learn to speak about sex!