#CancelBolsonaro

Reasons for signing

See why other supporters are signing, why this petition is important to them, and share your reason for signing (this will mean a lot to the starter of the petition).

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Josefa Domingues
Jul 29, 2020
Porquê não tem competência para governar

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Max Wolf
Jun 25, 2020
This guy is a bastard

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Jojo West
Jun 21, 2020
This is disgusting behavior inhibited by a president

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Allen Enriquez
Jun 20, 2020
It brings me with great joy to do this petition as the president of Brazil has been involved of killing the Amazon forest, Indians.

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olivia lagoueyte LAGOUEYTE
May 9, 2020
because i hate everything he's doing in Brazil. He probably never saw O Menino e O Mundo. I'm Always appalled when power is given to such persons, as it happens much too often.

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Luis antonio Franco da Justa Franco da Justa
May 2, 2020
Estou assinando porque quero bem do Brasil

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Eduardo Leite
Jan 21, 2020
O presidente é um desastre.

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Anita Kanitz
Nov 25, 2019
“We cannot expect in the immediate future that all women who seek it will achieve full equality of opportunity. But if women are to start moving towards that goal, we must believe in ourselves or no one else will believe in us; we must match our aspirations with the competence, courage and determination to succeed.”
Rosalyn Yalow, medical physicist & 1977 Nobel Prize winner

“We cannot all succeed when half of us are held back.”
Malala Yousafzai, activist & 2014 Nobel prize winner

“Women are still treated as secondary issues. It is still far too easy and accepted for leaders to ignore uncomfortable truths… Women, we know, are the first to be affected by war, and the last to be taken into account when it ends.”
Angelina Jolie, actor & activist

“over and over victims are blamed for their assaults. and when we imply that victims bring on their own fates - whether to make ourselves feel more efficacious or to make the world seem just - we prevent ourselves from taking the necessary precautions to protect ourselves. Why take precautions? We deny the trauma could easily have happened to us. And we also hurt the people already traumatized. Victims are often already full of self-doubt, and we make recovery harder by laying inspectors blame on them.”
― Anna C. Salter, Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders


“From New Delhi to New York, from Durban to Rio; women and
girls are been hunted down by rapists, abused by pedophiles and
emotionally decapitated by a society that is becoming increasingly
hostile to the womenfolk”
― Oche Otorkpa

"The greatest and oldest male hate crime on earth is FGM. FGM is always connected with sex slavery, child marriage, child rape, sexual torture, forced underaged and often deadly childbirths. The only reason for it is femicide, sexual mutilation, tortur and murder, sex slavery and heinous child rape with underaged child brides. It's the oldest and greatest witch hunt on this planet with deadly consequences. The victims are female babies, childs, underaged girls and young women. Don't call it custom, call it hate crime and sexual murder and end it this crime forever!"
-Anita Kanitz

“In the nineteenth century, girls who learned to develop orgasmic capacity by masturbation were regarded as medical problems. Often they were 'treated' or 'corrected' by amputation or cautery of the clitoris or 'miniature chastity belts,' sewing the vaginal lips together to put the clitoris out of reach, and even castration by surgical removal of the ovaries. But there are no references in the medical literature to the surgical removal of testicles or amputation of the penis to stop masturbation in boys.
In the United States, the last recorded clitoridectomy for curing masturbation was performed in 1948-- on a five-year-old girl.”
― Eve Ensler, The Vagina Monologues

“Here the oppression of women is very subtle. If we take female circumcision, the excision of the clitoris, it is done physically in Egypt. But here it is done psychologically and by education. So even if women have the clitoris, the clitoris was banned; it was removed by Freudian theory and by the mainstream culture.”

“Men impose deception on women and punish them for being deceived, force them down to the lowest level and punish them for falling so low, bind them in marriage and then chastise them with menial service for life, or insults, or blows.”

“They said, 'You are a savage and dangerous woman.' I am speaking the truth. And the truth is savage and dangerous.”

“Yet not for a single moment did I have any doubts about my own integrity and honor as a woman. I knew that my profession had been invented by men, and that men were in control of both our worlds, the one on earth, and the one in heaven. That men force women to sell their bodies at a price, and that the lowest paid body is that of a wife. All women are prostitutes of one kind or another.”
-Nawal El Saadawi

There are many crimes against women, girls and female childs: Domestic and sexual violence, street harassment, workplace harassment, catcalling, Eve teasing, tarrarush gamea, rape culture, mass and gang rapes, war rapes, child rapes, marital rapes, dowry murder, forced and child marriages, religous crimes, honour killings, FGM, sex slavery, women, girls and child trafficking, forced prostitution, rape pornography, online harassment, sadistic stalking, domestic and sexual murder, acid attacks, femicide, female infanticide, daily hate speech and sexism, sadistic and forced sexual practices, lack of freedom, education and human rights, forced dress codes like chador and burqa, victim blaming of assault, stalking, bullying and rape victims,witch hunts, widow murders, executions like stoning for rape and assault victims, imprisonment and punishment of female victims..
Violence against women, girls and female childs - particularly intimate partner violence and sexual violence - are major public health problems and violations of women's human rights and childrens rights..
Recent global prevalence figures indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.
Most of this violence is intimate partner violence. Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of physical and/or sexual violence by their intimate partner.
Globally, as many as 38% of murders of women are committed by an intimate partner.
Violence can negatively affect women’s physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health, and may increase vulnerability to HIV.
Factors associated with increased risk of perpetration of violence include low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality.
Factors associated with increased risk of experiencing intimate partner and sexual violence include low education, exposure to violence between parents, abuse during childhood, attitudes accepting violence and gender inequality.
There is evidence from high-income settings that school-based programmes may be effective in preventing relationship violence (or dating violence) among young people.
In low-income settings, primary prevention strategies, such as microfinance combined with gender equality training and community-based initiatives that address gender inequality and relationship skills, hold promise.
Situations of conflict, post conflict and displacement may exacerbate existing violence, such as by intimate partners, and present additional forms of violence against women.
Global violence uniquely affects the girl child. Although international legal instruments have been in place for decades to protect the girl child, thousands of brutal acts of violence and neglect specifically targeting the girl child can be observed around the world on a daily basis. For centuries, girls who have barely attained adolescence have been forced into marriage, often with men many years their senior. As a minor, a girl child cannot legally give her consent to enter into such a partnership. They have suffered in female genital mutilation rituals. They are traded, bought, and sold across national borders as commodities to be put to use as prostitutes or slaves, or merely to be sold again at a profit. Many girls are even victimized before birth, as technology and greater access to medicine have given rise to prenatal sex selection and selection abortion based on sex. Girls continue to face the threat of sexual harassment and abuse in workplaces and schools. Their lives may be taken for the “honor” of their families for speaking to strangers or committing other minor transgressions. Violence against the girl child has become a powerful and all-too-common tactic in times of war and humanitarian disaster.

Violence against the girl child is perpetrated on every continent, wielded by every social and economic class, and sanctioned to varying degrees by every form of government, every major religion, and every kind of communal or familial structure.

In a world where feminists are too often silenced, Nawal El Saadawi's fight against the patriarchy never fails to go unnoticed.

The feminist icon, activist, physician, and psychiatrist has continuously been upheld as one of the most badass women in the Middle East. She is known for her powerful words that offer insight into the political and sexual rights of women.

Although her radical perspective has sent her to prison and gotten her fired, El Saadawi draws inspiration from these lows to fight against female oppression.

The Egyptian feminist has written almost 50 novels that address taboo topics such as female genital mutilation, prostitution, domestic violence, and the imprisonment of women.

El Saadawi is a strong FGM opponent, having undergone the painful and unnecessary procedure at 12 years of age.

Books about FGM:

Cut: One Woman's Fight Against FGM in Britain Today by Hibo Wardere:
Imagine for a moment that you are 6-years-old and you are woken in the early hours, bathed and then dressed in rags before being led down to an ominous looking tent at the end of your garden. And there, you are subjected to the cruellest cut, ordered by your own mother.
Forced down on a bed, her legs held apart, Hibo Warderewas made to undergo female genital cutting, a process so brutal, she nearly died.
As a teenager she moved to London in the shadow of the Somalian Civil War where she quickly learnt the procedure she had undergone in her home country was not 'normal' in the west. She embarked on a journey to understand FGM and its roots, whilst raising her own family and dealing with the devastating consequences of the cutting in her own life. Today Hibo finds herself working in London as an FGM campaigner, helping young girls whose families plan to take them abroad for the procedure. She has vowed to devote herself to the campaign against FGM.
Eloquent and searingly honest, this is Hibo's memoir which promises not only to tell her remarkable story but also to shed light on a medieval practice that's being carried out in the 21stcentury, right on our doorstep. FGM in the UK has gone undocumented for too long and now that's going to change. Devastating, empowering and informative, this book brings to life a clash of cultures at the heart of contemporary society and shows how female genital mutilation is a very British problem.

Desert Flower by Wairis Dirie:
Waris Dirie (the name means desert flower) lives a double life - by day she is a famous model and UN spokeswoman on women's rights in Africa, at night she dreams of her native Somalia. Waris, one of 12 children, was born into a traditional family of desert nomads in East Africa. She remembers her early childhood as carefree- racing camels and moving on with her family to the next grazing spot - until it came her turn to meet the old woman who administered the ancient custom imposed on most Somalian girls: circumcision. Waris suffered this torture when she was just five years old. Then, aged 12, when her father attempted to arrange a marriage with a 60 year old stranger in exchange for five camels - she took flight. After an extraordinary escape through the dangerous desert she made her way to London and worked as a maid for the Somalian ambassador until that family returned home. Penniless and speaking little English, she became a janitor in McDonalds where she was famously discovered by a fashion photographer. Her story is a truly inspirational and extraordinary self-portrait of a remarkable woman whose spirit is as breathtaking as her beauty.

Books about rape:

"Rape Is Rape": How Denial, Distortion, and Victim Blaming Are Fueling a Hidden Acquaintance Rape Crisis by Jody Raphael JD:
“More than half of women and girls lie about rape . . .” “Feminists exaggerate rape prevalence to demonize men and raise money for their cause . . .” “Girls cry ‘rape’ when it’s nothing more than regret over bad sex . . .” Such emotionally charged false accusations have convinced much of the general public and the media that acquaintance rape is a figment of the imagination. As author Jody Raphael reveals in Rape Is Rape, the more acquaintance rape is reported and taken seriously by prosecutors, judges, and juries, the louder the clamor of rape denial becomes.

Through firsthand interviews with victims, medical and judicial records, social media analysis, and statistics from government agencies, Rape Is Rape exposes the tactics used by the deniers, a group that includes conservatives and right-wing Christians as well as some controversial feminists. The personal stories of young acquaintance rape victims whom Raphael interviewed demonstrate how assaults on their credibility, buttressed by claims of low prevalence, prevent many from holding their rapists accountable, enabling them to rape others with impunity. Rape Is Rape is an exposé of those using rape denial to further their political agendas, and it is a call to action to protect the rights of women and girls, making it safe for victims to come forward, and end the acquaintance rape crisis. A resources section is included for those seeking help, advice, or hoping to get involved.

"No Nation for Women": Reportage on Rape from India, the World's Largest Democracy by Priyanka Dubey:

No Nation for Women takes a hard, close look at what makes India unsafe for its women — from custodial rapes and honour killings to rapes of minors and trafficking — the author uncovers many unpalatable truths behind what we are familiar with as newspaper headlines only...

Numbers convey, in part, why India is referred to as one of the world’s rape capitals — one woman is raped every 15 minutes; and, in 50 years, there has been a staggering rise of 873 per cent in sexual crimes against girls.

And beyond the numbers and statistics, there are stories, often unreported — of women in Damoh, Madhya Pradesh, who are routinely raped if they spurn the advances of men; of girls from de-notified tribes in central India who have no recourse to justice if sexually violated; of victimized lower-caste girls in small-town Baduan, Uttar Pradesh; of frequent dislocation faced by survivor families in West Bengal; of political wrath turning into rape in Tripura.

Priyanka Dubey travels through large swathes of India, over a period of six years, to uncover the accounts of disenfranchised women who are caught in the grip of patriarchy and violence. She asks if, after the globally reported December 2012 gang-rape of ‘Nirbhaya’ in New Delhi, India’s gender narrative has shifted — and, if it hasn’t, what needs to be done to make this a nation worthy of its women.

"The Porn Myth": Exposing the Reality Behind the Fantasy of Pornography by Matthew Fradd;

Porn is paid rape!The Porn Myth is a non-religious response to the commonly held belief that pornography is a harmless or even beneficial pastime. Author Matt Fradd draws on the experience of porn performers and users, and the expertise of neurologists, sociologists, and psychologists to demonstrate that pornography is destructive to individuals, relationships, and society. He provides insightful arguments, supported by the latest scientific research, to discredit the fanciful claims used to defend and promote pornography.

This book explains the neurological reasons porn is addictive, helps individuals learn how to be free of porn, and offers real help to the parents and the spouses of porn users. Because recent research on pornography's harmful effects on the brain validates the experiences of countless porn users, there is a growing wave of passionate individuals trying to change the pro-porn cultural norm-by inspiring others to pursue real love and to avoid its hollow counterfeit.

Matt Fradd and this book are part of that movement, which is aiding the many men and women who are seeking a love untainted by warped perceptions of intimacy and rejecting the influence of porn in their lives.

"Nasty Little Girl": A Story Of Child Sexual Abuse by B. C. Monahan :

Seven year old Bethany suffers daily at the hands of her father and his new wife. Stripped of her clothes, food and any dignity. The abuse continues at school too but less shocking than what she receives at home. Those who should love and care for her only warp her mind into believing she is a nasty little girl.

This heartbreaking novella visits themes of sexual abuse and child abuse.

"Mother at Seven": The Shocking True Story of an Armenian Girl’s Stolen Childhood and Her Family’s Unspeakable, Cruel Betrayal by
Veronika Gasparyan :

Mother at Seven is the shocking, inspirational true story of a little girl’s tragic childhood, and how she endured and overcame a decade of unspeakable abuse at the hands of her cruel and sadistic family. Set in Sochi, Russia, near the banks of the majestic Black Sea, Mother at Seven tells of those critical moments in a child’s life when the only thing standing between the life and death itself was a pure and innocent belief that better days lie ahead. It teaches that by fighting through hardship and pain, miracles can still happen, and that life can still be amazing as long as hope is never lost.

"Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town"
by Jon Krakauer

From bestselling author Jon Krakauer, a stark, powerful, meticulously reported narrative about a series of sexual assaults at the University of Montana ­— stories that illuminate the human drama behind the national plague of campus rape.

Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, with a highly regarded state university, bucolic surroundings, a lively social scene, and an excellent football team — the Grizzlies — with a rabid fan base.

The Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to the Missoula police between January 2008 and May 2012. Few of these assaults were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical.

A DOJ report released in December of 2014 estimates 110,000 women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four are raped each year. Krakauer’s devastating narrative of what happened in Missoula makes clear why rape is so prevalent on American campuses, and why rape victims are so reluctant to report assault.

Acquaintance rape is a crime like no other. Unlike burglary or embezzlement or any other felony, the victim often comes under more suspicion than the alleged perpetrator. This is especially true if the victim is sexually active; if she had been drinking prior to the assault — and if the man she accuses plays on a popular sports team. The vanishingly small but highly publicized incidents of false accusations are often used to dismiss her claims in the press. If the case goes to trial, the woman’s entire personal life becomes fair game for defense attorneys.

This brutal reality goes a long way towards explaining why acquaintance rape is the most underreported crime in America. In addition to physical trauma, its victims often suffer devastating psychological damage that leads to feelings of shame, emotional paralysis and stigmatization. PTSD rates for rape victims are estimated to be 50%, higher than soldiers returning from war.

In Missoula, Krakauer chronicles the searing experiences of several women in Missoula — the nights when they were raped; their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the way they were treated by the police, prosecutors, defense attorneys; the public vilification and private anguish; their bravery in pushing forward and what it cost them.

Some of them went to the police. Some declined to go to the police, or to press charges, but sought redress from the university, which has its own, non-criminal judicial process when a student is accused of rape. In two cases the police agreed to press charges and the district attorney agreed to prosecute. One case led to a conviction; one to an acquittal. Those women courageous enough to press charges or to speak publicly about their experiences were attacked in the media, on Grizzly football fan sites, and/or to their faces. The university expelled three of the accused rapists, but one was reinstated by state officials in a secret proceeding. One district attorney testified for an alleged rapist at his university hearing. She later left the prosecutor’s office and successfully defended the Grizzlies’ star quarterback in his rape trial. The horror of being raped, in each woman’s case, was magnified by the mechanics of the justice system and the reaction of the community.

Krakauer’s dispassionate, carefully documented account of what these women endured cuts through the abstract ideological debate about campus rape. College-age women are not raped because they are promiscuous, or drunk, or send mixed signals, or feel guilty about casual sex, or seek attention. They are the victims of a terrible crime and deserving of compassion from society and fairness from a justice system that is clearly broken.

books about religious hate crimes:

Shamed: The Honour Killing That Shocked Britain – by the Sister Who Fought for Justice by Sarbjit Kaur Athwal (Autor):
In 1998, Sarbjit Athwal was called by her husband to attend a family meeting. It looked like just another family gathering. An attractive house in west London, a large dining room, two brothers, their mother, one wife. But the subject they were discussing was anything but ordinary. At the head of the group sat the elderly mother. She stared proudly around, smiling at her children, then raised her hand for silence. ‘It’s decided then,’ the old lady announced. ‘We have to get rid of her.’

‘Her’ was Surjit Athwal, Sarbjit’s sister-in-law. Within three weeks of that meeting, Surjit was dead: lured from London to India, drugged, strangled, and her body dumped in the Ravi River, never to be seen again.

After the killing, risking her own life, Sarbjit fought secretly for justice for nine long, scared years. Eventually, with immense bravery, she became the first person within a murderer’s family ever to go into open court in an honour killing trial as the Prosecution’s key witness, and the first to waive her anonymity in such a trial. As a result of her testimony, the trial led to the first successful prosecution of an honour killing without the body ever being found.

But her story doesn’t end there. Since the trial, her life has been threatened; her own husband arrested after an allegation of intimidation. Shamed is a story of fear and of horror – but also of immense courage, and a woman who risked everything to see that justice was done.

Honour: Achieving Justice for Banaz Mahmod by Caroline Goode (Autor) :
When Rahmat Sulemani reported his girlfriend Banaz missing, it quickly became clear to DCI Caroline Goode that something was very wrong. In fact, Banaz had contacted her local police station multiple times before, even listing the names of the men she expected to murder her in a so-called honour killing. Her parents didn't seem worried about her whereabouts, but Banaz had already accused them of being in on the conspiracy.

DCI Goode's homicide team took on the investigation before they even had proof that a murder had taken place. What emerged was a shocking story of betrayal and a community-wide web of lies, which would take the team from the suburban streets of south London to the mountain ranges of Kurdistan, making covert recordings and piecing together cell phone data to honour Banaz's memory and finally bring the killers to justice.

Victims of Honor Killings in America by K.Hezekiah Scipio, (Autor) :
Arranged marriage and its evil twin , "honor killings", are invading America through immigrant communities where Judeo-Christian religion is not the accepted practice. Under an insane custom called "honor killing",a girl can be killed with impunity because she rejects her parents' choice of a man to be her husband, or because she chooses to become a Christian. Forced marriage of any kind is wrong. It is, just as wrong, indeed, an atrocity when it is forced by adult family members upon a child to an older man. It is also an abomination to force anyone to become a member of any religion the person does not like, or stone a person to death because he or she renounces the family religion in favor of Christianity. In the pages of this book, are the stories of girls in American and Canadian cities and elsewhere who were murdered by their fathers and close relatives under the custom of "honor killing".

Burned Alive: A Victim of the Law of Men by Marie-Therese Cuny Souad (Autor), Marie-Therese Cuny (Autor) :A harrowing memoir by the vicim of an "honor crime" describes how a young Jordanian woman, who became pregnant following a brief love affair, was nearly killed by her own family because of the shame, her struggle to survive critical burns suffered after her being doused with gasoline and set on fire, her dramatic escape from Jordan, and her determination to build a new life for herself.

Crimes of the Community: Honour-based Violence in the UK by James Brandon (Autor), Salam Hafez (Autor) :
The report examines honour-killings, forced marriages, female genital mutilation and other forms of abuse.

Murder in the Name of Honour by Rana Husseini (Autor):
Citing the thousands of "honor based" murders that claim the lives of some 5,000 women in the U.S. and throughout the world, a controversial exposé by an award-winning journalist reveals the ways in which women are being subjected to violent "punishments," often at the hands of family members, for the purpose of restoring a family's reputation.

Daughters of Shame by Jasvinder Sanghera (Autor):
The woman who has done more than anyone to expose the plight of women in forced marriages tells their harrowing and moving stories. 'I listen to those stories – told by women who have been drugged, beaten, imprisoned, raped and terrorised within the walls of the homes they grew up in. I listen and I am humbled by their resilience.' Jasvinder Sanghera knows what it means to flee from your family under threat of forced marriage – and to face the terrible consequences that follow. As a young girl that was just what she had to do. Jasvinder is now at the frontline of the battle to save women from the honour-based violence and threat of forced marriage that destroyed her own youth. DAUGHTERS OF SHAME reveals the stories of young women such as Shazia, kidnapped and taken to Pakistan to marry a man she had never met; and Banaz, murdered by her own family after escaping an abusive marriage. By turns frightening, enthralling and uplifting, DAUGHTERS OF SHAME reveals Jasvinder as a woman heedless of her own personal safety as she fights to help these women, in a world where the suffering and abuse of many is challenged by the courage of the few.

The Stoning of Soraya M.: A Story of Injustice in Iran by Freidoune Sahebjam (Autor):
Soraya M.’s husband, Ghorban-Ali, couldn’t afford to marry another woman. Rather than returning Soraya’s dowry, as custom required before taking a second wife, he plotted with four friends and a counterfeit mullah to dispose of her. Together, they accused Soraya of adultery. Her only crime was cooking for a friend’s widowed husband. Exhausted by a lifetime of abuse and hardship, Soraya said nothing, and the makeshift tribunal took her silence as a confession of guilt. They sentenced her to death by stoning: a punishment prohibited by Islam but widely practiced.

Day by day—sometimes minute by minute—Sahebjam deftly recounts these horrendous events, tracing Soraya’s life with searing immediacy, from her arranged marriage and the births of her children to her husband’s increasing cruelty and her horrifying execution, where, by tradition, her father, husband, and sons hurled the first stones. A stark look at the intersection between culture and justice, this is one woman’s story, but it stands for the stories of thousands of women who suffered—and continue to suffer—the same fate. It is a story that must be told.

Sold: Story of Modern-day Slavery by Zana Muhsen (Autor):
Zana Muhsen, born and bred in Birmingham, is of Yemeni origin. When her father told her she was to spend a holiday with relatives in North Yemen, she jumped at the chance. Aged 15 and 13 respectively, Zana and her sister discovered that they had been literally sold into marriage, and that on their arrival they were virtually prisoners. They had to adapt to a completely alien way of life, with no running water, dung-plastered walls, frequent beatings, and the ordeal of childbirth on bare floors with only old women in attendance. After eight years of misery and humiliation Zana succeeded in escaping, but her sister is still there, and it seems likely that she will now never leave the country where she has spent more than half her life. This is an updated edition of Zana's account of her experiences.

Princess More Tears to Cry by Jean Sasson (Autor) :
When Jean Sasson's book Princess: Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia was published, it became an immediate international bestseller. It sold to 43 countries and spent 13 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Now, in this long-awaited, compelling new book, Sasson and the Princess 'Sultana' return to tell the world what it means to be a Saudi woman today.

Through advances in education and with access to work, Saudi women are breaking through the barriers; they are becoming doctors, social workers, business owners and are even managing to push at the boundaries of public life. Major steps forward have, undoubtedly, been made.

But this is not the whole story. Sadly, despite changes in the law, all too often legal loopholes leave women exposed to terrible suppression, abuse and crimes of psychological and physical violence.

For many, the struggle for basic human rights continues.

This fascinating insight will include personal stories of triumph and heartbreak, as told to Princess 'Sultana', her eldest daughter, and author Jean Sasson. Each of these stories will offer the reader a glimpse into different aspects of Saudi society, including the lives of the Princess, her daughter and other members of the Al-Saud Royal family.

I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali (Autor):
"I'm a simple village girl who has always obeyed the orders of my father and brothers. Since forever, I have learned to say yes to everything. Today I have decided to say no."
Forced by her father to marry a man three times her age, young Nujood Ali was sent away from her parents and beloved sisters and made to live with her husband and his family in an isolated village in rural Yemen. There she suffered daily from physical and emotional abuse by her mother-in-law and nightly at the rough hands of her spouse. Flouting his oath to wait to have sexual relations with Nujood until she was no longer a child, he took her virginity on their wedding night. She was only ten years old.
Unable to endure the pain and distress any longer, Nujood fled--not for home, but to the courthouse of the capital, paying for a taxi ride with a few precious coins of bread money. When a renowned Yemeni lawyer heard about the young victim, she took on Nujood's case and fought the archaic system in a country where almost half the girls are married while still under the legal age. Since their unprecedented victory in April 2008, Nujood's courageous defiance of both Yemeni customs and her own family has attracted a storm of international attention. Her story even incited change in Yemen and other Middle Eastern countries, where underage marriage laws are being increasingly enforced and other child brides have been granted divorces.
Recently honored alongside Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice as one of "Glamour" magazine's women of the year, Nujood now tells her full story for the first time. As she guides us from the magical, fragrant streets of the Old City of Sana'a to the cement-block slums and rural villages of this ancient land, her unflinching look at an injustice suffered by all too many girls around the world is at once shocking, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable.

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai (Autor);
*Winner of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize*

When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley, one girl fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, 9 October 2012, she almost paid the ultimate price when she was shot in the head at point-blank range.

Malala Yousafzai's extraordinary journey has taken her from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations. She has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and is the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.

I Am Malala will make you believe in the power of one person's voice to inspire change in the world.

*****

'Malala is an inspiration to girls and women all over the world' JK Rowling
'Moving and illuminating' Observer
'Inspirational and powerful' Grazia
'Her story is astonishing' Spectator

The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State by Nadia Murad (Autor):
WINNER OF THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE

In this intimate memoir of survival, a former captive of the Islamic State tells her harrowing and ultimately inspiring story.

Nadia Murad was born and raised in Kocho, a small village of farmers and shepherds in northern Iraq. A member of the Yazidi community, she and her brothers and sisters lived a quiet life. Nadia had dreams of becoming a history teacher or opening her own beauty salon.

On August 15th, 2014, when Nadia was just twenty-one years old, this life ended. Islamic State militants massacred the people of her village, executing men who refused to convert to Islam and women too old to become sex slaves. Six of Nadia’s brothers were killed, and her mother soon after, their bodies swept into mass graves. Nadia was taken to Mosul and forced, along with thousands of other Yazidi girls, into the ISIS slave trade.

Nadia would be held captive by several militants and repeatedly raped and beaten. Finally, she managed a narrow escape through the streets of Mosul, finding shelter in the home of a Sunni Muslim family whose eldest son risked his life to smuggle her to safety.

Today, Nadia's story—as a witness to the Islamic State's brutality, a survivor of rape, a refugee, a Yazidi—has forced the world to pay attention to an ongoing genocide. It is a call to action, a testament to the human will to survive, and a love letter to a lost country, a fragile community, and a family torn apart by war.

Daring to Drive: The Young Saudi Woman Who Stood Up to a Kingdom of Men by Manal Al-Sharif (Autor) :
Future generations will marvel at Manal al-Sharif. Her gripping account of homegrown courage will speak to the fighter in all of us. Books like this one can change the world' Deborah Feldman, New York Times bestselling author of Unorthodox 'Manal al-Sharif is following in a long tradition of women activists around the world who have put themselves on the line to expose and challenge discriminatory laws and policies' Malcolm Smart, Amnesty International News Manal al-Sharif was born in Mecca the year fundamentalism took hold in Saudi Arabia. As a young girl she would burn her brother's boy band CDs in the oven because music was haram: forbidden by Islamic law. By her twenties she was a computer security engineer. But as she became older, the unequal way in which women are treated became too much to bear: she was branded a slut for talking to male colleagues at work; her school-age brother had to chaperone her on business trips and, while she kept a car in her garage, she was forbidden from driving down Saudi streets. Her personal rebellion began the day she got behind the wheel of a car: an act that ultimately led to her arrest and imprisonment. Manal's Women2Drive campaign inspired other women to take action. Manal has been lauded by the Oslo Freedom Forum, described by Time Magazine as one of the most 100 most influential people in the world, and she was awarded the Vaclav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent. Daring to Drive is an account of Manal al-Sharif's fight for equality in an unequal society. A visceral coming-of-age tale, it is also a celebration of resilience, the power of education and the strength of female solidarity in the face of hardship.

Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia by Jean Sasson (Autor) :
Sultana Al-Sa'ud, a Saudi Arabian Princess, has four mansions on three continents, her own private jet, glittering jewels, and designer dresses galore. But in reality, Sultana has no freedom or control over her own life, no value but as a bearer of sons. Hidden behind her black floor-length veil, she is a prisoner, jailed by her father, her husband, her sons, and her country.

For the sake of her daughters, Sultana has decided to take the risk of speaking out about the life of women in her country: thirteen-year-old girls forced to marry men five times their age, young women killed by drowning, stoning, or isolation in the women's room, a padded, windowless cell where women are confined with neither light nor conversation until death claims them. In speaking out, Sultana risks bringing the wrath of the Saudi establishment upon her head. But by telling her story to Jean Sasson, Sultana allows us to see beyond the veils of this secret society, to the heart of a nation where sex, money, and power reign supreme.

My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban: A Young Woman's Story by Latifa Latifa (Autor):
Born into a middle-class Afghan family in Kabul in 1980, Latifa spent her early teenage days talking fashion and movies with her friends, listening to music, and dreaming of becoming a journalist.Then, on September 26, 1996, Taliban soldiers seized power in Kabul. Suddenly, streets were deserted. Her school was closed. Phones were cut. The radio fell silent. And from that moment, Latifa, just sixteen years old, became a prisoner in her own home. The simplest and most basic freedomslike walking down the street alone or even looking out of a windowwere forbidden.Latifa had never worn a veil before, but was now forced to put on a chadri, the state-mandated uniform that covered her entire body. Disbelief at having to hide herself was soon replaced by fear, the fear of being whipped or stoned like the other women shed seen in the streets. My Forbidden Face provides a moving and highly personal account of life under the Taliban regime. With painful honesty and clarity, Latifa describes her ordered world falling apart, in the name of a fanaticism that she could not comprehend, and replaced by a world where terror and oppression reign. In May 2001, Latifa and her parents escaped Afghanistan and were brought to Europe in an operation organized by a French-based Afghan resistance group and French Elle. Since then she has been writing My Forbidden Face in collaboration with Chekeba Hachemi, the founder of Afghanistan Libre. They both live in Paris.

Shackled to my Family by Samina Younis (Autor);
This is the true story of Samina Younis, born in Britain to a strict, religious Muslim family - a family that practices the tradition of forced marriage which they brought back with them from their village in Pakistan.

One of seven sisters and two brothers, she was a bitter disappointment to her parents who desperately wanted a son; as a result she suffered terrible physical and mental abuse at the hands of both her mother and father; later she was to fall victim to continued abuse from her very own siblings.

At the age of just sixteen, on a trip to Pakistan Samina was told that she must marry her second cousin, a boy she had met only once in her life and for whom she had no affection whatsoever.

The writing of this book was Samina's only way of coming to terms with the life that she had been forced into, the mental conflict over her enduring love for a mother, now dead, who even on her deathbed was compelled to dominate and control her future. The book recounts her struggle against her family and her dramatic escape to a life of her own.

The publishers and author wish to thank the thousands of people who have already read this book and made it such a success in raising awareness to cruel and archaic practices forced on women and men around the world.

Orchid Child: My journey from Child Bride to acid attack survivor by Ms Lynn Pereira (Autor) :
This colourful and descriptive story by acid attack survivor Lynn Pereira is an autobiography of her life and has powerful insights into life before the Vietnam war and after it, as well as fascinating insights into the world of the rich and famous. As a piece of fiction it would be amazing. Yet it is a true story and truly inspirational. It has saved at least one life in its unpublished form and can save more. Orchid Child begins in pre war Vietnam with the sex attack of a girl and swiftly moves on to the bright lights of Las Vegas after she is abandoned and disowned by her American husband who abducts their children. She eventually finds fortune and a new life in London, England where she builds up a successful business from nothing but is blighted once more by an acid attack of monstrous proportions that leaves her disfigured and blind. It took six years in private hospital and over 140 operations to rebuild her face - a face that has cost a million. The former entertainer and model with a talent for stocks and shares has many highs and lows in her life including a reckless showbiz marriage to a pop singer who bleeds her dry financially as well as emotionally. Amazingly the highs outweigh the lows as it leaves Lynn realising that she has many reasons to be positive about life even when experiencing the most horrifying times that are almost impossible to imagine. In writing her story Lynn has realised that her story has the power to heal and she is no longer a victim of life but instead, a victor!

Female Infanticide and Child Marriage by Sambodh Goswami (Autor) :
India witnesses one of the highest female infanticide incidents in the world: study

At least 117 million girls around the world demographically go “missing” due to sex-selective abortions!In a first ever global study on female infanticide by Asian Centre for Human Rights, a Delhi-based NGO dedicated to protection of human rights, it has been revealed that preference of son over daughter is a major reason for female infanticide in many countries around the world. Dowry system in South Asia, which makes daughters “an unaffordable economic burden”, also contributes to female infanticide.

Titled “Female Infanticide Worldwide: The case for action by the UN Human Rights Council”, the report makes a continent-wise analysis of infanticide patterns. It sets the tone by stating that 117 million girls !

Married By Force by Married by Leila:
This is a devastating first-hand testimony exposing the cruel and widespread practice of forced marriage. 'I was twenty years old and dreamed of marrying for love.' Leila was born and brought up in France by Moroccan-born parents. But her romantic dreams were shattered when she was forced by her father to marry a man she'd never met, fifteen years older than her, and whose language she couldn't understand. The husband she didn't love beat her regularly in an attempt to force her into submission. With extraordinary courage, Leila fought back against the weight of family tradition to regain her liberty and dignity. And despite the very real risks, she has left her husband and speaks out openly against the evils of forced marriage.

Tears of the Silenced: An Amish True Crime Memoir of Childhood Sexual Abuse, Brutal Betrayal, and Ultimate Survival by Misty Griffin (Autor)
Surviving child abuse, parental betrayal and sexual assault

Misty Griffin's courageous life story sheds light on the hidden, untold, stories of the MeToo movement.

A true crime memoir: When Misty was six years old her family started to live and dress like the Amish. Misty and her sister were kept as slaves on a mountain ranch where they were subjected to almost complete isolation, sexual abuse, and extreme physical violence. The two young girls were too terrified to escape, they also knew that no rescue would ever come because only a few people even knew they existed and they did not know them well enough to care. The strict religious clothing the family wore acted as a barrier no one was willing to breach in order to check on the girl's welfare.

Amish Sexual abuse: When Misty reached her late teens, her parents feared she and her sister would escape and took them to an Amish community where they were adopted and became baptized members. Misty was devastated to once again find herself in a world of fear, animal cruelty and sexual abuse. Going to the police was severely frowned upon. A few years later, Misty was sexually assaulted by the bishop. As Misty recalls, "Amish sexual abusers are only shunned by the church for six weeks, a punishment that never seems to work. After I was assaulted by the bishop I knew I had to get help and one freezing morning in early March I made a dash for a tiny police station in rural Minnesota. After reporting the bishop I left the Amish and found myself plummeted into the strange modern world with only a second or third-grade education and no ID or social security card. To all abuse survivors out there, please be encouraged, the cycle of abuse can be broken. Today, I am a nursing student and a child abuse and sexual assault awareness activist. This is my story."

If you have read Scared Selfless, A Child Called It, The Sound of Gravel, or Etched In Sand, then Tears of the Silenced is a must read.

Crime and Impunity: Sexual Torture of Women in Islamic Republic Prisons by Justice for Iran (Autor) .
Throughout the 1980s in Iran, thousands of individuals were arrested and detained for supposedly supporting or participating in oppositional political organizations that were critical of the Islamic Republic regime’s undemocratic practices. So far, many reputable reports have been published detailing the various torture methods inflicted upon the political prisoners in that decade. However, despite anecdotal evidence on sexual abuses in the prisons of Iran, the topic has not yet been subject to systematic study. This book based on testimonials of victims, survivors, witnesses and experts, examines the extent to which women prisoners were systematically subjected to sexual violence as a gender-specific means of silencing young Iranian girls and women dissidents. It covers details of mistreatment of women prisoners at the hands of Iranian prison authorities and highlights the impact of such acts on the young prisoners and their children who were subjected to or witnessed sexual violence. It also analyses the parallel processes of authority and the manner in which Iranian security officials raped and tortured those about to face execution or forced prisoners into marriage as a barter for their life.

My Prison, My Home: One Woman's Story of Captivity in Iran by My Prison, My Home: One Woman's Story of Captivity in Iran;
My Prison, My Home is the harrowing true story of Iranian-American scholar Haleh Esfandiari’s arrest on false charges and subsequent incarceration in Evin Prison, the most notorious penitentiary in Ahmadinejad’s Iran. Esfandiari’s riveting, deeply personal, and illuminating first-person account of her ordeal is the inspiring tale of one woman’s triumph over interrogation, intimidation, and fear. Offering a shocking, close-up view inside the paranoid mindset of the repressive Ahmadinejad regime, My Prison, My Home sheds light on a high-stakes international incident that sparked protests from some of the world’s most influential public figures—including Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and former U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright

Captive in Iran: A Remarkable True Story of Hope and Triumph amid the Horror of Tehran's Brutal Evin Prison by Maryam Rostampour (Autor), Marziyeh Amirizadeh (Autor), Anne Graham Lotz:
Maryam Rostampour and Marziyeh Amirizadeh knew they were putting their lives on the line. Islamic laws in Iran forbade them from sharing their Christian beliefs, but in three years, they’d covertly put New Testaments into the hands of twenty thousand of their countrymen and started two secret house churches.

In 2009, they were finally arrested and held in the notorious Evin Prison in Tehran, a place where inmates are routinely tortured and executions are commonplace. In the face of ruthless interrogations, persecution, and a death sentence, Maryam and Marziyeh chose to take the radical—and dangerous—step of sharing their faith inside the very walls of the government stronghold that was meant to silence them. In Captive in Iran, two courageous Iranian women recount how God used their 259 days in Evin Prison to shine His light into one of the world’s darkest places, giving hope to those who had lost everything and showing love to those in despair.

Stolen Girls: Survivors of Boko Haram Tell Their Story by Wolfgang Bauer (Autor):
One night in April 2014, members of the terrorist organization Boko Haram raided the small town of Chibok in northeast Nigeria and abducted 276 young girls from the local boarding school. The event caused massive, international outrage. Using the hashtag “Bring Back Our Girls,” politicians, activists, and celebrities from all around the world—among them First Lady Michelle Obama and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai—protested.

Some of the girls were able to escape and award-winning journalist Wolfgang Bauer spent several weeks with them as they recounted their ordeal. In Stolen Girls, he gives voice to these girls, allowing them to speak for themselves—about their lives before the abduction, about the horrors during their captivity, and their dreams of a better future. Bauer’s reportage is complemented by over a dozen stunning portraits by award-winning photographer Andy Spyra.

Bauer also examines the historical and political background of the Islamist terror in the heart of Africa, showing how Boko Haram works and describing the damage it has done to the fragile balance of ethnicities and cultures in one of the world’s most diverse regions. His book tells a story of violence, fear, and uncertainty; it is also a story of hope, strength, and courage.

The Chibok Girls: The Boko Haram Kidnappings & Islamic Militancy in Nigeria by Helon Habila (Autor) :
An urgent Penguin Special investigating the 2014 mass-kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls by the world's deadliest terrorists

On 14th April 2014, 276 girls disappeared from a secondary school in northern Nigeria, kidnapped by the world's deadliest terror group. A tiny number have escaped back to their families but many remain missing.

Reporting from inside the traumatised and blockaded community of Chibok, Helon Habila tracks down the survivors and the bereaved. Two years after the attack, he bears witness to their stories and to their grief. And moving from the personal to the political, he presents a comprehensive indictment of Boko Haram, tracing the circumstances of their ascent and the terrible fallout of their ongoing presence in Nigeria.

Gendercide: China's Missing Girls by Congressional-Executive Commission on China (Autor) :
The cultural preference for boys in China, exacerbated by China’s birth-limitation policies, has led to millions of girls being aborted and killed over the past several decades. As a result, China faces some of the world’s most severe gender imbalances—according to official estimates, there are currently 34 million more males than females in China. Demographic experts have warned that China’s large number of "surplus males" could lead to societal instability, higher crime rates and sexual violence, and increased trafficking of women and girls. Serious doubts persist about the extent to which the recently announced "Two-Child Policy" will ameliorate the tragedy of gendercide given that data has shown that sex ratios are often more skewed after the birth of the first child. This hearing will seek to address human rights and demographic concerns in relation to the issue of gendercide in China. Witnesses will offer analysis and policy recommendations to combat this problem as well as lessons learned from other countries which have struggled with gender imbalances either as a result of cultural preference or government policy.

Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China (Asian Arguments) by Leta Hong-Fincher (Autor):
In the early years of the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party sought to transform gender relations, but those gains have been steadily eroded in recent decades during China’s transition to a post-socialist era. In fact, women in China have experienced a dramatic rollback of rights and gains relative to men. In Leftover Women, journalist Leta Hong-Fincher exposes shocking levels of structural discrimination against women and highlights the broader damage this has caused to China’s economy, politics, and development.

Drawing on cutting-edge data from a Sina Weibo survey of over three hundred men and women as well as in-depth interviews with both men and women in China over several years, Leftover Women debunks several major myths about the status of women in China’s post-socialist period. In this thoroughly expanded second edition, Hong-Fincher builds on her earlier work to examine new developments, most notably China’s growing and increasingly assertive feminist movement, and she looks ahead to consider the implications of these developments for the future of China and its ruling regime.

The first book to offer a unique, inside view of educated women in China’s emerging middle class, Leftover Women provides an insightful analysis of the realities women in China face today.

Terrorizing Women: Feminicide in the Americas by Terrorizing Women: Feminicide in the Americas:
More than 600 women and girls have been murdered and more than 1,000 have disappeared in the Mexican state of Chihuahua since 1993. Violence against women has increased throughout Mexico and in other countries, including Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Peru. Law enforcement officials have often failed or refused to undertake investigations and prosecutions, creating a climate of impunity for perpetrators and denying truth and justice to survivors of violence and victims’ relatives. Terrorizing Women is an impassioned yet rigorously analytical response to the escalation in violence against women in Latin America during the past two decades. It is part of a feminist effort to categorize violence rooted in gendered power structures as a violation of human rights. The analytical framework of feminicide is crucial to that effort, as the editors explain in their introduction. They define feminicide as gender-based violence that implicates both the state (directly or indirectly) and individual perpetrators. It is structural violence rooted in social, political, economic, and cultural inequalities.

Terrorizing Women brings together essays by feminist and human rights activists, attorneys, and scholars from Latin America and the United States, as well as testimonios by relatives of women who were disappeared or murdered. In addition to investigating egregious violations of women’s human rights, the contributors consider feminicide in relation to neoliberal economic policies, the violent legacies of military regimes, and the sexual fetishization of women’s bodies. They suggest strategies for confronting feminicide; propose legal, political, and social routes for redressing injustices; and track alternative remedies generated by the communities affected by gender-based violence. In a photo essay portraying the justice movement in Chihuahua, relatives of disappeared and murdered women bear witness to feminicide and demand accountability.

Contributors: Pascha Bueno-Hansen, Adriana Carmona López, Ana Carcedo Cabañas, Jennifer Casey, Lucha Castro Rodríguez , Angélica Cházaro, Rebecca Coplan, Héctor Domínguez-Ruvalcaba, Marta Fontenla, Alma Gomez Caballero, Christina Iturralde, Marcela Lagarde y de los Ríos, Julia Estela Monárrez Fragoso, Hilda Morales Trujillo, Mercedes Olivera, Patricia Ravelo Blancas, Katherine Ruhl, Montserrat Sagot, Rita Laura Segato, Alicia Schmidt Camacho, William Paul Simmons, Deborah M. Weissman, Melissa W. Wright

More than 600 women and girls have been murdered and more than 1,000 have disappeared in the Mexican state of Chihuahua since 1993. Violence against women has increased throughout Mexico and in other countries, including Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Peru. Law enforcement officials have often failed or refused to undertake investigations and prosecutions, creating a climate of impunity for perpetrators and denying truth and justice to survivors of violence and victims’ relatives. Terrorizing Women is an impassioned yet rigorously analytical response to the escalation in violence against women in Latin America during the past two decades. It is part of a feminist effort to categorize violence rooted in gendered power structures as a violation of human rights. The analytical framework of feminicide is crucial to that effort, as the editors explain in their introduction. They define feminicide as gender-based violence that implicates both the state (directly or indirectly) and individual perpetrators. It is structural violence rooted in social, political, economic, and cultural inequalities.

Terrorizing Women brings together essays by feminist and human rights activists, attorneys, and scholars from Latin America and the United States, as well as testimonios by relatives of women who were disappeared or murdered. In addition to investigating egregious violations of women’s human rights, the contributors consider feminicide in relation to neoliberal economic policies, the violent legacies of military regimes, and the sexual fetishization of women’s bodies. They suggest strategies for confronting feminicide; propose legal, political, and social routes for redressing injustices; and track alternative remedies generated by the communities affected by gender-based violence. In a photo essay portraying the justice movement in Chihuahua, relatives of disappeared and murdered women bear witness to feminicide and demand accountability.

Contributors: Pascha Bueno-Hansen, Adriana Carmona López, Ana Carcedo Cabañas, Jennifer Casey, Lucha Castro Rodríguez , Angélica Cházaro, Rebecca Coplan, Héctor Domínguez-Ruvalcaba, Marta Fontenla, Alma Gomez Caballero, Christina Iturralde, Marcela Lagarde y de los Ríos, Julia Estela Monárrez Fragoso, Hilda Morales Trujillo, Mercedes Olivera, Patricia Ravelo Blancas, Katherine Ruhl, Montserrat Sagot, Rita Laura Segato, Alicia Schmidt Camacho, William Paul Simmons, Deborah M. Weissman, Melissa W. Wright by Adelle Gascoyne (Herausgeber), Dr Bongani Andile Lujabe (Autor) :
Author, Dr. Bongani Lujabe, is a Xhosa man who grew up in Cofimvaba in the former Transkei. He completed his high school education in Umtata and B.SC in Fort Hare and MB.Ch.B. in Medunsa. His cultural background provides the basis of his expertise on the subject of African Traditional Religion and its impact on toxic masculinity and the wave of gender-based violence in South Africa. He was born again at the age of 43 in September 1999 and has since seen many deliverance miracles. "Femicide and gender-based violence" is long overdue. It will challenge the reader to carefully consider their own cultural and religious beliefs and practices with the intended result of this introspection of making life-changing decisions that will impact them, their current generation and those to follow.This book aims to challenge some of the often baseless theories about the contributing causes of femicide, child murders, and even suicide, and to challenge the sacred sentimental stereotypes, based on religion and culture, that many people seem to believe are untouchable; stereotypes that are often neatly sidestepped in discussions, while people seem all so emotional in seeking solutions. We aim to expose the reality behind these stereotypes, and what their role is with respect to the scourge of femicides, suicides, and child murders.This book provides the anatomy and physiology of femicide and gender violence, as well as the remedy, for gender-based violence and toxic masculinity. Case studies and sample prayers are provided, making this book practical and relevant for our day. By reading this book, and applying its principles, no family who has done so should ever lose their daughters from femicide, their children from infanticide and family murders, from suicides, from road carnages and from murder again. Read for yourself, and be empowered.

The European Witch-Hunt by Julian Goodare (Autor) :
The European Witch-Hunt seeks to explain why thousands of people, mostly lower-class women, were deliberately tortured and killed in the name of religion and morality during three centuries of intermittent witch-hunting throughout Europe and North America.

Combining perspectives from history, sociology, psychology and other disciplines, this book provides a comprehensive account of witch-hunting in early modern Europe. Julian Goodare sets out an original interpretation of witch-hunting as an episode of ideologically-driven persecution by the ‘godly state’ in the era of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. Full weight is also given to the context of village social relationships, and there is a detailed analysis of gender issues. Witch-hunting was a legal operation, and the courts’ rationale for interrogation under torture is explained. Panicking local elites, rather than central governments, were at the forefront of witch-hunting. Further chapters explore folk beliefs about legendary witches, and intellectuals’ beliefs about a secret conspiracy of witches in league with the Devil. Witch-hunting eventually declined when the ideological pressure to combat the Devil’s allies slackened. A final chapter sets witch-hunting in the context of other episodes of modern persecution.

This book is the ideal resource for students exploring the history of witch-hunting. Its level of detail and use of social theory also make it important for scholars and researchers.

The oppressed: Women in Islam by Hashem Mohamed (Autor):
How women are treated by Islam?

Is it true that a woman worth less than a man, the husband is allowed to rape and beat his wife while she is not allowed to work or leave the house?

She is forced, oppressed and suffered from FGM and she can be a victim of honor killing?

Does Islam need a reformation? Do women have any rights in Islam?

What is Sharia anyway?

This book is a result of a long study of the Quran, hadith and Islamic history.

In this book we will understand the situation of women in our modern world. We will search for the roots of FGM, honor killing and will know what Islam says about them.

We will try to find the Islamic meaning of Hijab, the reasons behind it, and will see if there is a relationship between wearing it and being oppressed.

Then we will go back in the history and will see what the situation of women was during the Islamic caliphate and at the time of Mohamed, the prophet of Islam.

We will understand what sharia is and what women’s rights in Islam are.

This book is for everyone who cares about women’s rights.

This book is for every man who thinks that he can use the religion to justify his bad actions toward women.

This book is for the Muslim woman who doesn’t know her rights.

This book is for you.

Brutal: The Heartbreaking True Story of a Little Girl's Stolen Innocence by Nabila Sharma (Autor):
'Brutal' is the shocking, revelatory and heart-rending account of one girl's plight in a society where honour and shame are a matter of life and death. It is a tale of innocence lost and a life shattered, but above all it is a tale of survival, of a young girl who found love and hope in the darkest of places.

The state, Women and Domestic Violence in Egypt: The ongoing processes underpinning domestic violence against women in light of the fast paced developments in Egypt by Reem El Barbary (Autor) :
An attempt will be made through this book to examine the severity of Domestic Violence against women in Egypt in light of the patriarchal structures in place vis a vis “state capacity” in terms of the ability of the state to respond; with a particular emphasis on the institutional framework under which domestic violence takes place. The main argument made is that patriarchy has been a key element in shaping or molding the foundations and institutions that administer or run society, and for these patriarchal foundations to be kept up, violence or an unconscious threat of it is required against any entity that challenges it including and especially women. This book will focus primarily on violence amon

Thanks for adding your voice.

Sandro Brasil
1 year ago
ÚNICA SOLUÇÃO: "1 Auditoria Cidadã da Dívida, sem sigilo, com participação da sociedade; 2 Fim da Reeleição no mesmo cargo ou noutro diferente; 3 Fim do Cargo de livre nomeação."

Thanks for adding your voice.

Maxime Lepers
1 year ago
He destroys the amazonia and don't respect his population and the earth