Expose toddler's 20-year old mannitol overdose cover-up by hospital and public officials.

Expose toddler's 20-year old mannitol overdose cover-up by hospital and public officials.

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The Dex Walkwood Trust started this petition to Senator Marco Rubio and

 

Medical Negligence Causing Toddler's Death was Concealed for more than Twenty Years

Hospital’s gives toddler a fatal amount of mannitol while on life support. Then Miami Children's Hospital, the University of Miami, Miami-Dade County public officials, and Florida prosecutors conspired to cover up the medical negligence.

On August 6, 2000, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue responded to the A-1 Budget Motel in Homestead, Florida to treat 32-month old, Malique Earl Jean-Baptiste. The father of the child’s sibling, and mother's boyfriend, Duane Walker, 28, had reported that the motel room’s television set, which was not secured to it's stand, had fallen onto the child as he and his younger brother sat eating their lunch in front of the set. First- responders that treated the child reported that the child was unresponsive with “...no external injuries it bruises noted”. The toddler was transported by Miami-Dade Air Rescue to Miami Children's Hospital.

The child arrived at the hospital's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) in critical condition and was treated for blunt chest trauma and hypoxic brain injury and was placed on life support. Miami Children's Hospital’s Dr. Gim Huat Tan told Homestead Police Department's Detective Sheila Johnson that the child’s brain injury appeared to be from lack of oxygen to the brain and that he believed the chest trauma that the child sustained was consistent with a heavy object falling onto the child restricting his breathing.
The victim began to have brain swelling which is typical in cases where the brain has been deprived of oxygen. This condition raises intracranial pressure (ICP) within the skull. Medical professionals usually administer drugs that induce urination (diuretics) in order to lower ICP. When administering diuretics in these cases, it is essential that the patient's ICP is measured and closely monitored during and after infusion of the drug. At the time of Malique's injury, mannitol was the recommended diuretic. According to a publication by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke entitled “Traumatic Brain Injury”, a patient's ICP would be measured and monitored by inserting a probe or catheter through the patient's skull and connecting it to an ICP monitor. However, in Malique’s case, his ICP was never measured, while Miami Children's Hospital staff administered an excessive amount of mannitol to the child. Malique immediately developed diabetes insipidus and died while on life support two days later.
To this day, Malique’s biological parents were never told that their child suffered a fatal adverse reaction to the mannitol that the hospital gave their son. Most likely, to prevent them from suing the hospital for medical negligence. Instead, the following is how Malique’s death was handled:
1. While the child was considered “clinically brain dead”, although he had not yet been officially declared brain dead, hospital staff requested permission to administer a blood transfusion to the child. The absurdity of this is that brain death is irreversible. In other words, every medical doctor knows that a blood transfusion would not have been able to save the child’s life. Malique’s parents were unaware of this medical fact. Perhaps that is why the hospital requested permission to give the child a blood transfusion even though, in their medical opinion, the child was already brain dead.
2. After he was officially pronounced brain dead, Malique’s body remained on life support for ten hours (9:55) while Miami Children's Hospital and The University of Miami’s School of Medicine staff performed many post-mortem procedures and conducted lab tests. The only record of those ten hours is a four-page outline of the patient's hospital course which included those ten hours.
3. Miami-Dade County Associate Medical Examiner, Dr. Emma Lew, elected to order a toxicology analysis on the child's antemortem blood (that was taken upon his admission to the hospital two days prior to his death) instead of his postmortem blood (taken directly from his body during the autopsy). The antemortem toxicology is the only toxicology that exists besides the PICU labs.

4. An innocent man was wrongfully convicted of the child's death. Duane Walker, the child's common-law step-father, pled guilty during a stay of proceedings pending a court-ordered mental competency determination. Walker had been incarcerated in the county jail for 11 years and 2 months pending trial. Walker, a diagnosed schizophrenic, was made to stipulate to his mental competency for the plea. The court never entered a written order of competent to proceed, so his mental competency is still in question. Walker's defense counsel paid him $100 to enter the guilty plea two days after Walker attempted suicide in his cell. Walker's suicide attempt was because his defense counsels failed to list Walker's defense witnesses for trial which was set to begin the following day. Walker was convicted and sentenced for second degree murder, a crime not charged in the indictment. Also, the grand jury indictment had the date of death as 8-9-2000, while the child's death certificate which was signed by M.E. Dr. Emma Lew, held 8-8-2000 as the official date of death.

EVIDENCE AND RECORDS OF ALL THAT IS STATED ABOVE IS ON FILE AND AVAILABLE.

 

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