Petition Closed

To Liam Neeson and the producers of this film,
In your movie, “The Grey” the story takes place in Alaska, and oil drilling team struggle to survive after a plane crash strands them in the wild. Hunting the humans are a pack of wolves who see them as intruders.
Your Film’s Trailer depicts a pack of bloodthirsty wolves hunting a group of plane crash survivors. This is both erroneous and detrimental to the efforts of groups trying to preserve these animals. Your Film adds to the misconception that wolves will attack and kill humans without provocation, much as the same way the film “Jaws” created the myth that Great white sharks will hunt humans as a food source. Wolves should be protected yet hunters and farmers claim tit is necessary to kill these animals, going as far as running them to the point of exhaustion by helicopter then shooting the wolf.
We the undersigned are not asking you to pull your film as this country is not about censorship, but we ask that you please add some kind of footnote explaining the plight of these animals and that this is a work of fiction and wolves will not attack a group of humans as depicted in your film.
Some basic facts about wolves are:
1. You stand a better chance of being struck by lightning than being killed by a wolf.
In general, wolves fear humans and do not approach them. In fact, very few incidents involving wolves attacking humans have occurred in North America. Those rare occurrences were reportedly caused because wolves associated humans as a source for food like garbage or scraps, or because a wolf was likely reacting to the presence of dogs (McNay 2002). To prevent conflicts with wildlife, people must act responsibly by never feeding or approaching wild animals or take other actions that cause wild animals to lose fear of humans.
2. Wolves and large grazing animals lived side-by-side for tens of thousands of years before the first settlers arrived.
Recent studies on Yellowstone elk and wolves have found that weather and hunter harvest affect elk declines more than wolf predation. In fact, wolves often enhance prey populations by culling weak and sick animals from the gene pool, leaving only the strongest animals to reproduce. Food availability and weather regulate wolf populations. When their prey is scarce, wolves suffer too. They breed less frequently, have fewer litters, and may even starve to death.
3. Wildlife tourism is a major part of the economic base of the northern Rockies.
For instance, in the counties around Yellowstone National Park , livestock production accounts for less than 4% of personal income, while tourism-related industries account for more than 50%. Moreover the effect of wolves on the livestock industry as a whole is negligible, with wolves accounting for less than 1% of livestock losses.
4. In portions of the northern Rockies and Southwest, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) designated wolves as "experimental, nonessential" populations.
This special designation gave landowners a limited right to kill wolves caught in the act of preying on livestock on private property and increased the ability of FWS to remove or destroy problem wolves. Since 1978, wolves, listed as threatened in Minnesota, have been managed under a special regulation that controls individuals that kill livestock and pets.
5. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, very few land use restrictions have proven necessary to facilitate wolf recovery in Montana and Minnesota.
The service reports that land use restrictions are necessary only if illegal mortality of wolves occurs at high levels.
6. Numerous polls taken throughout the United States consistently demonstrate that more people support wolf recovery than oppose it.
In fact, a 2002 quantitative summary of human attitudes towards wolves found that 61% of the general population samples had positive attitudes towards wolves
Wolves were almost hunted to extinction due to humans and now we humans must do what we can to preserve these creatures, if not for the wolf there would be over population of deer, antelope, and other animals that the wolves hunt. Farmers and Hunters must learn how to live side by side with these animals and not hunt them because they are a perceived threat. We ask that you please take this into consideration with your film.
Thank You.

 

Letter to
Liam Nesson,Liddell Entertainment,Open Road Films
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Liam Nesson,Liddell Entertainment,Open Road Films.

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Please add a discliamer to their Film "The Grey"

To Liam Neeson and the producers of this film,
In your movie, “The Grey” the story takes place in Alaska, and oil drilling team struggle to survive after a plane crash strands them in the wild. Hunting the humans are a pack of wolves who see them as intruders.
Your Film’s Trailer depicts a pack of bloodthirsty wolves hunting a group of plane crash survivors. This is both erroneous and detrimental to the efforts of groups trying to preserve these animals. Your Film adds to the misconception that wolves will attack and kill humans without provocation, much as the same way the film “Jaws” created the myth that Great white sharks will hunt humans as a food source. Wolves should be protected yet hunters and farmers claim tit is necessary to kill these animals, going as far as running them to the point of exhaustion by helicopter then shooting the wolf.
We the undersigned are not asking you to pull your film as this country is not about censorship, but we ask that you please add some kind of footnote explaining the plight of these animals and that this is a work of fiction and wolves will not attack a group of humans as depicted in your film.
Some basic facts about wolves are:
1. You stand a better chance of being struck by lightning than being killed by a wolf.
In general, wolves fear humans and do not approach them. In fact, very few incidents involving wolves attacking humans have occurred in North America. Those rare occurrences were reportedly caused because wolves associated humans as a source for food like garbage or scraps, or because a wolf was likely reacting to the presence of dogs (McNay 2002). To prevent conflicts with wildlife, people must act responsibly by never feeding or approaching wild animals or take other actions that cause wild animals to lose fear of humans.
2. Wolves and large grazing animals lived side-by-side for tens of thousands of years before the first settlers arrived.
Recent studies on Yellowstone elk and wolves have found that weather and hunter harvest affect elk declines more than wolf predation. In fact, wolves often enhance prey populations by culling weak and sick animals from the gene pool, leaving only the strongest animals to reproduce. Food availability and weather regulate wolf populations. When their prey is scarce, wolves suffer too. They breed less frequently, have fewer litters, and may even starve to death.
3. Wildlife tourism is a major part of the economic base of the northern Rockies.
For instance, in the counties around Yellowstone National Park , livestock production accounts for less than 4% of personal income, while tourism-related industries account for more than 50%. Moreover the effect of wolves on the livestock industry as a whole is negligible, with wolves accounting for less than 1% of livestock losses.
4. In portions of the northern Rockies and Southwest, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) designated wolves as "experimental, nonessential" populations.
This special designation gave landowners a limited right to kill wolves caught in the act of preying on livestock on private property and increased the ability of FWS to remove or destroy problem wolves. Since 1978, wolves, listed as threatened in Minnesota, have been managed under a special regulation that controls individuals that kill livestock and pets.
5. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, very few land use restrictions have proven necessary to facilitate wolf recovery in Montana and Minnesota.
The service reports that land use restrictions are necessary only if illegal mortality of wolves occurs at high levels.
6. Numerous polls taken throughout the United States consistently demonstrate that more people support wolf recovery than oppose it.
In fact, a 2002 quantitative summary of human attitudes towards wolves found that 61% of the general population samples had positive attitudes towards wolves
Wolves were almost hunted to extinction due to humans and now we humans must do what we can to preserve these creatures, if not for the wolf there would be over population of deer, antelope, and other animals that the wolves hunt. Farmers and Hunters must learn how to live side by side with these animals and not hunt them because they are a perceived threat. We ask that you please take this into consideration with your film.
Thank You.


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Sincerely,