Relocation of Confederate statue located on Paris, TX Courthouse Yard

Reasons for signing

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Brad Jacobs
Jun 11, 2021
The Confederacy failed in their attempts to preserve slavery. There's no reason for a Confederate anything to be displayed anywhere except a museum dedicated to the civil war.

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Thomas Nieland
Jun 10, 2021
Stop the inhumanity and hypocrisy-slavery was defeated!

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Linda Greene
Jun 10, 2021
This is a very well written & thought out petition.I wish you good luck with it from Houston! 

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Robert Thomas
Feb 5, 2021
The confederacy represents treason due to forcibly seceding from the union under the excuse of “states rights” when in reality it was for the preservation of slavery. All confederate statues, monuments and flags should come down and be relocated to museums and cemeteries.

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Meg Fletcher
1 year ago
I have empathy for minority residents who see this symbol of oppression in our city.

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Jonathan Thomas
1 year ago
It needs to be moved because there is no reason it should be downtown next to the courthouse.

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Brett Uribe
1 year ago
This statue represents the disenfranchisement of black Americans to vote, and for the murder of millions in support of slavery. Take it down!

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Brett Uribe
1 year ago
This statue represents the disenfranchisement of black Americans to vote, and for the murder of millions in support of slavery. Take it down!

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Dorothy Mckinnon
1 year ago
I am signing this petition because this symbol of past racism does not need to be a constant reminder to anyone entering our courthouse.

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Dewin Barnette
1 year ago
I am signing in honor of the lives of Henry Smith, Irving Arthur, Herman Arthur, and the Arthur sisters, and Brandon McClelland.