Justice for Sexual Trauma in the Military

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Anita Kanitz
Apr 16, 2021
"We do not want to use the term ‘harassment.’ What is happening today is sexual terrorism.Dealing with a sexual harassment case at work that security won’t take seriously. They messed with the wrong woman. I was quiet years ago, I won’t be this time. Sexual violence is a major issue affecting women around the world. It occurs within homes, on college campuses, in times of conflict, and in times of peace. Society has developed a certain attitude towards sexual assault. It has been embedded within culture that women are lesser than men and viewed as subordinate. Sexual violence has been normalized by media, desensitizing society to actual assault and hindering action against it. Women often bear the responsibility and blame of their assault rather than their attacker. This failure to protect victims of sexual assault and shifting of the blame to women for their own assault is termed rape culture; it is when the traumatic assault of a woman is trivialized, when men are given a pass and women are scolded for what they were wearing at the time of the attack, and when a woman would rather stay silent than seek the prosecution of her assailant. Sexual violence and the consequences of rape culture are violations of human rights in which the dignity and equality of women are not recognized. Rape culture is a human rights issue rooted in patriarchal societies, the normalization of sexual violence in media, and victim blaming.
Let me say that: The majority of men do not rape. But consider these other categories:
Men who do not rape but would be willing to rape if they were sure they would not be punished.
Men who do not rape but will not intervene when another man rapes.
Men who do not rape but buy sex with women who have been, or likely will be, raped in the context of being prostituted.
Men who do not rape but will watch films of women in situations that depict rape or rape-like acts.
Men who do not rape but find the idea of rape sexually arousing.
Men who do not rape but whose sexual arousal depends on feeling dominant and having power over a woman.
Men who do not rape but routinely masturbate to pornography in which women are presented as objectified bodies whose primary, or only, function is to provide sexual pleasure for men.
Those men are not rapists. But is that fact — that the men in these categories are not, in legal terms, guilty of rape — comforting? Are we advancing the cause of ending men’s violence against women by focusing only on the acts legally defined as rape? Rape is rape, and rape culture is rape culture"
Anita Kanitz

" Men, permitted to put words (and other things) in women's mouths, create scenes in which women desperately want to be bound, battered, tortured, humiliated, and killed."
-Catharine MacKinnon

"Pornography is now beyond anyone’s control. It’s a classic example of ever-controversial unregulated capitalism — the market automatically responding to individual needs and desires. I continue to support and defend pornography, which I believe exposes the deepest, darkest truths about sexuality."
-Camille Paglia

“It is not a single crime when a child is photographed while sexually assaulted (raped.) It is a life time crime that should have life time punishments attached to it. If the surviving child is, more often than not, going to suffer for life for the crime(s) committed against them, shouldn't the pedophiles suffer just as long? If it often takes decades for survivors to come to terms with exactly how much damage was caused to them, why are there time limits for prosecution?”
― Sierra D. Waters, Debbie

“The rape of a child is a violent act of contempt, not an expression of sexuality or affection.”
― Mike Lew, Gay Men and Childhood Sexual Trauma

"We are very close to death. All women are. And we are very close to rape and we are very close to beating. And we are inside a system of humiliation from which there is no escape for us. We use statistics not to try to quantify the injuries, but to convince the world that those injuries even exist. Those statistics are not abstractions. It is easy to say, Ah, the statistics, somebody writes them up one way and somebody writes them up another way. That’s true. But I hear about the rapes one by one by one by one by one, which is also how they happen. Those statistics are not abstract to me. Every three minutes a woman is being raped. Every eighteen seconds a woman is being beaten. There is nothing abstract about it. It is happening right now as I am speaking."
-Andrea Dworkin

" Women are socially disadvantaged in controlling sexual access to their bodies through socialization to customs that define a woman's body as for sexual use by men. Sexual access is regularly forced or pressured or routinized beyond denial."
-Catharine MacKinnon

"All sex, even consensual sex between a married couple, is an act of violence perpetrated against a woman."
-Catharine MacKinnon

What causes misogynistic thinking? New study finds link with early exposure to pornography !
Have you encountered a man with a sexist attitude? His introduction to pornography could be the stem, according to a new study.
Researchers from the University of Nebraska, U.S., conducted an experiment to determine how exposure to porn for the first time could shape a man’s views on masculinity and sexuality.

To do so, they handed out a 46-question survey to 330 undergraduate men ages 17 to 54. It was designed to measure masculine norms, and it included questions about the first time males saw pornography and whether or not it was an accident.

On average, respondents said they were about 13 years old when they were first exposed to pornography. More than 43 percent said it was by accident, 33 percent said they sought it out and 17 percent said they were forced. About 6 percent declined to answer.

After analyzing the data, scientists found that men who were exposed to porn for the first time at a younger age mostly agreed with statements that asserted male superiority.

However, those who were older when they were first exposed to pornography and had a “greater endorsement of Playboy masculine norms,” such as having multiple sexual partners.

“We expected that the younger the boys were when first exposed to pornography, the more likely they were to adopt playboy norms as well as norms of masculine power over women,” researcher Alyssa Bischmann said in a statement. “We don’t have a lot of theories that would explain this unexpected inverse relationship between pornography use and playboy norms.”However, the scientists did note that their experiment didn’t identify other factors, such as negative sexual experiences, performance anxiety, religiosity and frequency of use, which could be related to the surprising results.

Therefore, more research is needed.

“Future research,” the study said, “should also investigate outcomes of these relations by including measures of relationship satisfaction, wellbeing, and perpetration of violence against women, as these variables may be related to masculine norms and pornography.”

Pornography is the instruction to rape, sexual torture and murder and sexual femicide! There is not only fantasy in porns, there is the real humilation, rape, torture, mutilation and sometimes murder of women, girls and childs. That are heinous sex crimes, nothing more and nothing less.

Hate crime: Deepfakes
Deepfakes: Blackmail 2.0
Naked on the net - without knowing it? That can happen with deepfakes. Videos and photos produced using artificial intelligence are flooding the Internet. They are becoming easier and easier to manufacture. Initially, actresses and pop stars were the victims. Now it can hit any woman - with nude pictures and porn.

In the analog age, there were joke pens with photos of women in their sleeves for horny office stallions. If you turned the pen upside down, the woman was undressed. What wasn't funny back then has now reached an alarming dimension. It's called: Deepfake.

The term is made up of the English words "deep learning" and "fake" - that is, machine learning with artificial intelligence and falsification. The result is software that creates photos and videos that appear deceptively real, for example by placing Ms. X's head on top of Ms. Y's. A clothed person can also simply be stripped naked in a photo. The victims of photo and video deepfakes are mostly women.

What a few years ago special software was needed for, an app is sufficient today!

What a few years ago required huge amounts of data and special software, an app is sufficient today. The Chinese app "Zao", for example, takes a single portrait photo to cut a person's face in video clips, including in porn scenes, of course.

The Dutch company Deeptrace examined around 15,000 deepfake videos last year. The result: 96 percent of the films were pornography - in most cases the heads of Hollywood actresses or pop singers were deceptively realistically mounted in pornography.

A popular victim: feminist Emma Watson. That's especially cool, because she's not just a woman, she's also a feminist. But pretty much every actress and singer who is trendy right now appears in several of these videos. From Reese Witherspoon to Nicole Kidman and Taylor Swift to Kristen Stewart.

But it doesn't just hit stars, it can hit any woman. With the “deepfake revenge porn” a genre of its own has now emerged. The ex-girlfriend's face is tinkered into a porno and sent to friends. Often women are even blackmailed with it. For example, by sending it to the woman's parents or to employers, according to Deeptrace. 55,000 of this “revenge porn” are checked by Facebook every month.

The same principle applies to nude photos that are created using deepfake software. The software inserts deceptively real parts of a synthetically produced woman's body at the point where the body is clothed, according to the body shape. The artificially created naked body is extremely close to the real one.

The messenger service Telegram, for example, which uses a bot to convert photos of women into nude images, has fallen into disrepute. The program is even designed specifically for women. In order to generate a nude picture, the perpetrators send photos of their victims to a program via Telegram. After a short time they get back the photo that has been manipulated into a nude picture.

Fake nude photos and porn videos are often sent to parents.

So far, more than 100,000 AI-generated nude photos have been created on Telegram and shared in dubious channels. Women in the Arab world have already been blackmailed with it. These photos are also gladly sent to parents and employers.

At the end of October, Apple implemented a lock so that iPhones and iPads can no longer access the Telegram bot. It still works on Android devices and Telegram's MacOS app. Telegram was founded by Pawel Durow, known as the "Russian Mark Zuckerberg". Most of the users worldwide who use the nude picture function come from Eastern Europe.

Apart from the fact that mostly women are victims of these fakes, fake videos and photos further destroy the trust in the media, which has already been broken. Anything can be a lie. Republican politicians in the vicinity of Trump have already questioned the video showing the violent death of George Floyd. These forgeries undermine democracy.

And the judiciary? Once again, that can't keep up. Every journalistic product must answer in terms of press law. But internet providers seem to operate in an unlawful area, they "only" provide the software. The rest is done by the users. Both violate personal rights and copyrights - and human dignity - thousands of times without being prosecuted in any way.

But there is another way. Australia has made making deepfakes a criminal offense. Offenders have been jailed there for several years since 2018. Where there is a will, there is a way.

I have also been a victim of sexual cyber harassment for 17 years by a psychopathic Islamist Australian ex-renter.
After rent disputes and the tenant moving out, I was able to enjoy the usual stalking incidents damn fast: telephone terror, group stalking, group harassment, lurking professionally and privately, break-in attempts and break-ins, privately, professionally, on vacation and health resort, property damage, then mail and faxes, that Relatives have died, floods of sadistic porn mails, vulgar sex offers, even the famous penis pics with a circumcised penis, harassment of my female friends at home and abroad, on the Internet, through property damage, telephone harassment, break-ins, I also got alleged revenge porn of his Alleged female friends, it was about BDSM porn with tied up women, then my husband's computer was hacked and destroyed several times, obviously photo files were also hacked, because then it got really funny. With my head and name, international porn sites, sex contacts were switched, always the same motto: fucking k.

The really funny thing is, there are no nude photos of me, not a single bikini photo, and I've been fighting pornography with women's organizations since 1977. In the meantime, I wish the stalker that his masculine equipment rots away.
It is now a male hobby to destroy women's and girls' lives worldwide on the Internet, victims of violence and rape are filmed during the act and posted as allegedly sex-horny whores, ex-partners post nude videos and photos on the Internet, send them to friends, Relatives and employers, then the heads of the victims are mounted on perverted porn videos and porn photos and thus the victim is ridiculed and humiliated worldwide. With the exception of Australia, the perpetrators go unpunished worldwide.
The height of the harassment is that I am still bombarded with stupid calls from unknown foreign men and at my age and still on the net porn sites under my name are nasty deep fakes, such as the sadistic porn site Assholefever or an insulting suitor and whore forum, where women even more to be demoted than usual.
But there is also damage to property and human dung in the garden. The Koran says that women are the field of men, but as far as I know the Koran doesn't say that good male Muslims are entitled to shit in women's gardens.

The stalking and harassment on the net started right at the beginning of the rental period, when I was 48 years old and involved in organizations for women's and human rights and also an active member. Now I am 66 years old and the hate campaign of obviously many women-hating perpetrators who at least more than sympathize with the Islamic apartheid that women are completely worthless and are only suitable as sex objects is going on.
Sexualized, misogynistic and often very personal - online violence is increasing rapidly. The perpetrators usually go unmolested. It doesn't matter what you look like, it is enough that you open your mouth as a woman, as a young woman or as a woman in general. We expose these men and these haters by showing that we have brains. And that what they are trying to portray, their image of women, does not correspond at all to what we portray: the strong woman who is not allowed to exist in her world. And that's why we are an enemy. And that's why they go into the personal and try to hurt women with it.
The violence women experience online is mostly sexualized, clearly misogynistic and often very personal. Female Politicians receive hardcore porn with their heads mounted. Female Journalists are advertised on relevant websites as prostitutes on the Internet. Female Climate activists have to protect their private addresses because the rapists would like to drop by in real life. And of course there are also the dick pics: photos of penises that younger women in particular receive unsolicited direct messages on social media. This development leaves its mark - on women themselves, but not least in our society. Net violence is changing the way women move, behave and express themselves on the Internet. Many consider very carefully which topics they are still addressing on social media. You censor yourself to protect yourself. According to a European study, every second woman stays out of discussions on social networks after such experiences. Politicians are resigning from their offices or no longer running because they can no longer stand the online hatred. Women journalists are more often affected by depression and anxiety disorders due to hatred on the net, report less on certain topics or even consider getting out of journalism altogether. Much of what women have fought for in analogue life since the women's movement is being questioned again online - and often remains unchallenged or unpunished.

Because that is also part of the truth: Many women who defend themselves and go to the police to file a complaint are ridiculed. They are asked why they have to "provoke so" or why they not just delete their Facebook account when everything is so bad. Prosecutors are quick to drop proceedings because they do not recognize violence against women as such and do not punish it as hate crime. It takes consistent law enforcement. This can only happen if the authorities are aware that misogyny on the Internet is not a trivial matter and not a coincidence. This not only requires more women in the apparatus, but also training and a management culture that does not downplay or glorify violence against women. Legislation is needed that addresses violence against women. Because if perpetrators are not held accountable, hatred and violence against women in public become a bit more normal every day.

And we, who are part of this public, can help to draw red lines. By supporting women who are being attacked on the internet every day in front of all of us. In concrete terms, this means: solidarity in the comment columns, by direct message or by retweet. Anyone who receives support cannot be silenced so quickly. Knowing that you are not alone is still a great motivation for many politically active women online, not to give up and to oppose the hatred.

We must say it very clear: The biggest hate crime against women right now is: Sexual cyber harassment!
Computers have changed so much in our daily lives that they have had a huge impact on crime too. Over time, the number of criminal offenses has increased as individuals have used computer technology to better organize every aspect of their lives, from finance and dating to work and process automation. This has created a multitude of gray areas and led to unclear laws that attempt to regulate the types of information that can be posted or shared online.
One aspect of online culture that is changing both the dating and legal landscape is sharing explicit personal photos or nudes. With easy access to amazing cameras right in our pocket, we can share photos with loved ones right away. At the same time, digital technology has made it easier than ever to distribute or share these types of photos online. This has led to an increase in what women worldwide call sexual cyber harassment.
Sexual assaults usually take place via private messages in chats, messengers and communities. Increasingly, harassment can also be observed in public, e.g. as a comment under videos or in the chat on live streams. Even the first pictures and sentences can be annoying, and sometimes the attacks only start after a short small talk. Many victims are minors!
Most of the time, the harassers ask children and young people about their sexual experiences or describe their own sexual practices and wishes. The victims are then asked to perform sexual acts on themselves or others, or even to perform webcam broadcasts. Pornographic files and links are often transmitted.
These crimes are still not punished, why not?

books about:

Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable/Susan Strauss (Autor)
Despite headlines that label all harassment among youth as bullying, there is in fact a difference between sexual harassment and bullying. This book discusses the similarities and important differences between the two, offering firsthand accounts from victims and others involved in combating the activities that victimize students. It provides parents, youth advocates, scout leaders, and other concerned adults with practical steps to partner with schools to prevent and intervene on the behaviors to help keep kids safe. The book clearly identifies the steps to take to hold schools accountable when a student has been harassed or bullied, even when the school is not stopping the behavior. Providing examples throughout the work, Strauss helps readers become better acquainted with the various activities that constitute sexual harassment and bullying and what they can do to combat the problem.

Nowhere to Hide: Trus story of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault / Linda Jenkins (Autor)
This author is truly brave to share this painful truth. Her story will empower others to speak up and stop harassment! Thank you Linda for being a voice for victims.

Caged Eyes: An Air Force Cadet's Story of Rape and Resilience /Lynn K. Hall (Autor)
Desperate to realize her childhood dream of being an astronaut, Lynn K. Hall was an enthusiastic young cadet. For Hall, the military offered an escape from her chaotic home—her erratic mother, absent biological father, and a man she called “dad” who sexually abused her. Resolute and committed to the Air Force Academy, Hall survived the ordeals of a first-year cadet: intense hazing from upperclassmen, grueling physical training, and demanding coursework. But she’s dismissed from the Academy when, after being raped by an upperclassman and contracting herpes, she is diagnosed with meningitis and left with chronic and debilitating pain.
Betrayed by the Academy and overcome with shame, Hall candidly recounts her loss of self, the dissociation from her body and the forfeiture of her individuality as a result of the military’s demands and her perpetrator’s abuse. Forced to leave the military and return to the civilian world, Hall turns to extreme sports to cope with and overcome PTSD and chronic pain. She, in turn, reclaims herself on the mountain trails of the Colorado Rockies.
An intimate account of grappling with shame and a misogynistic culture that condones rape and blames victims, Caged Eyes is also a transformative story of how it’s possible to help yourself and others in the aftermath of a profound injustice.

Surviving the Silence: Black Women's Stories of Rape/Charlotte Pierce-Baker (Autor)
In this "intelligent", "stunning", and "honest" book, Charlotte Pierce-Baker weaves together the accounts of black women who have been raped and who have felt that they had to remain silent in order to protect themselves and their race.
It opens with the author's harrowing and courageous account of her rape and includes the stories of the author's own family's response, plus the voices of black men who have supported rape survivors.

In the Name of Honor: A Memoir /Mukhtar Mai (Autor)
In June 2002, journalists throughout the world began to hear of the gang rape of a Pakistani woman from the impoverished village of Meerwala. The rape was ordered by a local clan known as the Mastoi and was arranged as punishment for indiscretions allegedly committed by the woman's brother. While certainly not the first account of a female body being negotiated for honor in a family, and (sadly) not the last, journalists and activists were captivated. This time the survivor had chosen to fight back, and in doing so, single-handedly changed the feminist movement in Pakistan. Her name was Mukhtar Mai, and her decision to stand up to her accusers was an act of bravery unheard of in one of the world's most adverse climates for women.
By July 2002, Mai's case was headline news in Pakistan and under international scrutiny, the government awarded her the equivalent of 8,500 U.S. dollars in compensation money (a historic settlement), and her attackers were sentenced to death. Mukhtar Mai went on to open a school for girls in an effort to ensure that future generations would not suffer, as she had, from illiteracy.
In this rousing account, Mai describes her experience and how she has since become an agent for change and a beacon of hope for oppressed women around the world. Timely and topical, In the Name of Honor is the remarkable and inspirational memoir of a woman who fought and triumphed against exceptional odds.

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town /Jon Krakauer (Autor)
Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, home to a highly regarded state university whose beloved football team inspires a passionately loyal fan base. Between January 2008 and May 2012, hundreds of students reported sexual assaults to the local police. Few of the cases were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical.
In these pages, acclaimed journalist Jon Krakauer investigates a spate of campus rapes that occurred in Missoula over a four-year period. Taking the town as a case study for a crime that is sadly prevalent throughout the nation, Krakauer documents the experiences of five victims: their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the skepticism directed at them by police, prosecutors, and the public; their bravery in pushing forward and what it cost them. These stories cut through abstract ideological debate about acquaintance rape to demonstrate that it does not happen because women are sending mixed signals or seeking attention. They are victims of a terrible crime, deserving of fairness from our justice system. Rigorously researched, rendered in incisive prose, Missoula stands as an essential call to action.

Anti-Porn: The Resurgence of Anti-Pornography Feminism /Julia Long (Author)
Anti-porn feminism is back. Countering the ongoing "pornification" of Western culture and society, anti-porn movements are powerfully re-emerging among a new generation of feminist activists in the UK and worldwide.
Anti-Porn: The Resurgence of Anti-Porn Feminism examines the ways in which the new feminist arguments and campaigns around pornography are articulated, deployed and received. Drawing on original, ethnographic research, it provides an in-depth analysis of the ideological stance, tactical repertoires, impact and significance of campaign groups challenging the pornography industry.
This unique and inspiring book explains the astonishing comeback of anti-porn feminism and challenges liberal perspectives and the mainstreaming on pornography of pornography that changes the nature of our intimate relationships.

Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions/Gloria Steinem (Author)
Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions has sold over half a million copies since its original publication in 1983, acclaimed for its witty, warm, and life-changing view of the world, "as if women mattered." Steinem's truly personal writing is here, from the now-famous exposé, "I Was a Playboy Bunny," to the moving tribute to her mother "Ruth's Song (Because She Could Not Sing It)". Her prescient essays on female genital mutilation and the difference between erotica and pornography that are still referenced and relevant today, and the hilarious satire, "If Men Could Menstruate” resonates as much as ever.
As Watson writes of Steinem in her foreword, “She makes what otherwise can be arduous and depressing reading into something not only relatable, but also enjoyable... Her plain common sense, calling things out as they are, will make you laugh out loud. This is her superpower.”

Sex and the Civil War: Soldiers, Pornography, and the Making of American Morality/ Judith Giesberg (Author)
Civil War soldiers enjoyed unprecedented access to obscene materials of all sorts, including mass-produced erotic fiction, cartes de visite, playing cards, and stereographs. A perfect storm of antebellum legal, technological, and commercial developments, coupled with the concentration of men fed into armies, created a demand for, and a deluge of, pornography in the military camps. Illicit materials entered in haversacks, through the mail, or from sutlers; soldiers found pornography discarded on the ground, and civilians discovered it in abandoned camps. Though few examples survived the war, these materials raised sharp concerns among reformers and lawmakers, who launched campaigns to combat it. By the war's end, a victorious, resurgent American nation-state sought to assert its moral authority by redefining human relations of the most intimate sort, including the regulation of sex and reproduction—most evident in the Comstock laws, a federal law and a series of state measures outlawing pornography, contraception, and abortion. With this book, Judith Giesberg has written the first serious study of the erotica and pornography that nineteenth-century American soldiers read and shared and links them to the postwar reaction to pornography and to debates about the future of sex and marriage.

Pornography: Men Possessing Women/Andrea Dworkin (Author)
This strongly argued feminist case against pornography stirred tremendous controversy when first published in 1979, and has lost none of its bite. Dworkin ( Letters from a War Zone ), who lobbies for municipal statutes declaring pornography a violation of women's civil rights, insists that pornography links sex and violence by incorporating violent domination of women as a key element of sexual fantasy: "Force in high-class pornography is romanticized . . . as if it were dance." Dworkin also takes what many consider to be an extreme position; she believes that pornography incites men to sexual violence. To support her thesis, she draws parallels between the life and writings of the Marquis de Sade and provides critical summaries of several contemporary pornographic works. Dworkin's style is intense, vivid and eloquent, infused with a sense of urgency.

Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality/Gail Dines (Author)
Professor Gail Dines has written about and researched the porn industry for over two decades. She attends industry conferences, interviews producers and performers, and speaks to hundreds of men and women each year about their experience with porn. Students and educators describe her work as “life changing.”
In Pornland—the culmination of her life’s work—Dines takes an unflinching look at porn and its affect on our lives. Astonishingly, the average age of first viewing porn is now 11.5 years for boys, and with the advent of the Internet, it’s no surprise that young people are consuming more porn than ever. But, as Dines shows, today’s porn is strikingly different from yesterday’s Playboy. As porn culture has become absorbed into pop culture, a new wave of entrepreneurs are creating porn that is even more hard-core, violent, sexist, and racist. To differentiate their products in a glutted market, producers have created profitable niche products—like teen sex, torture porn, and gonzo—in order to entice a generation of desensitized users.
Going from the backstreets to Wall Street, Dines traces the extensive money trail behind this multibillion-dollar industry—one that reaps more profits than the film and music industries combined. Like Big Tobacco—with its powerful lobbying groups and sophisticated business practices—porn companies don’t simply sell products. Rather they influence legislators, partner with mainstream media, and develop new technologies like streaming video for cell phones. Proving that this assembly line of content is actually limiting our sexual freedom, Dines argues that porn’s omnipresence has become a public health concern we can no longer ignore.

Sexual Harassment Online: Shaming and Silencing Women in the Digital Age/Tania G. Levey
Women who use social media are often subjected to blatant sexual harassment, facing everything from name calling to threats of violence. Aside from being disturbing, what does this abuse tell us about gender and sexual norms? And can we use the Internet to resist, even transform, destructive misogynistic norms?
Exploring the language of shaming and silencing women in the cybersphere, Tania Levey addresses these questions and also considers how online attempts to regulate women’s behavior intersect with issues of race, ethnicity, and class.

Gender Trolling: How Misogyny Went Viral / Karla Mantilla
Mantilla provides a thoughtful and thorough framework for understanding gender specific harassment and its relationship to broader "real life" gender-based abuses of women. She ties online threats and sexual harassment to intimate partner abuse, street harassment, workplace sexual harassment and rape and recommends structural, legal and corporate approaches to increasing women’s safety and free speech online.

Sexting and Revenge Pornography: Legislative and Social Dimensions of a Modern Digital Phenomenon/ Andy Phippen (Author), Maggie Brennan (Author)
This book considers the rapidly evolving, both legally and socially, nature of image-based abuse, for both minors and adults. Drawing mainly from UK data, legislation and case studies, it presents a thesis that the law is, at best, struggling to keep up with some fundamental issues around image based abuse, such as the sexual nature of the crimes and the long term impact on victims, and at worst, in the case of supporting minors, not fit for purpose. It shows, through empirical and legislative analysis, that the dearth of education around this topic, coupled with cultural norms, creates a victim blaming culture that extends into adulthood. It proposes both legislative developments and need for wider stakeholder engagement to understand and support victims, and the impact the non-consensual sharing of intimate images can have on their long-term mental health and life in general. The book is of interest to scholar of law, criminology, sociology, police and socio-technical studies, and is also to those who practice law, law enforcement or wider social care role in both child and adult safeguarding.

Stand Up to Sexting: An Open Conversation for Parents and Tweens/Christy Monson (Author), Heather Boynton (Author),
Sexting-the texting of nude or sexually suggestive images to another person-has become so commonplace that nearly 1 in 4 teens admits to being a participant. The problem is, sexting destroys self-esteem, undermines healthy relationships, leads to depression and self-harm, and can even result to run-ins with the law. It's no wonder that parents recently put sexting among their top-3 parenting concerns-but what's a parent to do?
Stand Up to Sexting is the essential guidebook for parents and tweens to having an open, relaxed conversation about the dangers of sexting. Written in miniature chapters, the book includes friendly illustrations, Q&A prompts for easy conversations, and tools for staying safe. Designed for tweens ages 10-13, the book is the perfect preemptive tool for preparing your kids before their teen years strike.

Bye Felipe: Disses, Dick Pics, and Other Delights of Modern Dating /Alexandra Tweten (Author)
After one too many hostile dating app encounters, Alexandra Tweten set up the Instagram account @ByeFelipe, a place for women to protest the horrors of online dating, and to share stories and screenshots of their own experiences. Three years later, the account has become a forum where women can fight back against the men who have made them uncomfortable, scared, and embarrassed -- and to laugh at the appalling men they encounter.
The name of Bye Felipe is a nod to the "Bye Felicia" meme, which Urban Dictionary defines as a cool dismissal of a noxious person. In that spirit, the book helps women navigate the perils that come with swiping right and provides practical steps to overcome the harassment rampant in the dating app ether. Blending humor, feminist theory, and solidarity, this "field guide" provides profiles of the worst types of guys (also known as "Felipes") -- from the classic fat shamer to the mansplainer to the surprise sociopath -- answers questions like "How do I react when a guy sends me a dic pic?," and gives women the tools they need to take control of their dating life. With stories, screenshots, and Riot Grrrl-esque graphic art throughout, Bye Felipe empowers women to stand up for themselves and uphold the confidence and self-worth Felipes try so desperately to steal.

Nobody's Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls /Carrie Goldberg (Author)
Nobody's Victim is an unflinching look at a hidden world most people don’t know exists—one of stalking, blackmail, and sexual violence, online and off—and the incredible story of how one lawyer, determined to fight back, turned her own hell into a revolution.
“We are all a moment away from having our life overtaken by somebody hell-bent on our destruction.” That grim reality—gleaned from personal experience and twenty years of trauma work—is a fundamental principle of Carrie Goldberg’s cutting-edge victims’ rights law firm.
Riveting and an essential timely conversation-starter, Nobody's Victim invites readers to join Carrie on the front lines of the war against sexual violence and privacy violations as she fights for revenge porn and sextortion laws, uncovers major Title IX violations, and sues the hell out of tech companies, schools, and powerful sexual predators. Her battleground is the courtroom; her crusade is to transform clients from victims into warriors.
In gripping detail, Carrie shares the diabolical ways her clients are attacked and how she, through her unique combination of advocacy, badass relentlessness, risk-taking, and client-empowerment, pursues justice for them all. There are stories about a woman whose ex-boyfriend made fake bomb threats in her name and caused a national panic; a fifteen-year-old girl who was sexually assaulted on school grounds and then suspended when she reported the attack; and a man whose ex-boyfriend used a dating app to send more than 1,200 men to ex's home and work for sex. With breathtaking honesty, Carrie also shares her own shattering story about why she began her work and the uphill battle of building a business.
While her clients are a diverse group—from every gender, sexual orientation, age, class, race, religion, occupation, and background—the offenders are not. They are highly predictable. In this book, Carrie offers a taxonomy of the four types of offenders she encounters most often at her firm: assholes, psychos, pervs, and trolls. “If we recognize the patterns of these perpetrators,” she explains, “we know how to fight back.”
Deeply personal yet achingly universal, Nobody's Victim is a bold and much-needed analysis of victim protection in the era of the Internet. This book is an urgent warning of a coming crisis, a predictor of imminent danger, and a weapon to take back control and protect ourselves—both online and off.

No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us/Rachel Louise Snyder (Author)
We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem.
In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths―that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.

But, Why Did You Stay?: How I Survived Domestic Violence/ Mekisha Jane Walker (Author)
If it can happen to her, a capable trial attorney, it can happen to anyone. Mekisha Jane Walker’s ground-breaking and thought-provoking memoir has the potential to change the way domestic violence is viewed. Sharing her journey provides a fascinating insight into the confusion and agony women experience at the hands of an abuser, who was once their perfect love. Mekisha’s incorporation of photos, video, audio, and court documents makes you feel as if you were actually there. This book will change lives by helping not only victims but also providing a better understanding of abusive relationships so that parents, siblings, and friends can help the woman on her path to regain control of her life.
Mekisha Jane Walker takes you through her journey; a strong-willed successful attorney by day and a domestic violence victim by night. With her secret revealed, she was faced with the question, “why did you stay?” This is her answer to the question. She is a force to be reckoned with and she has survived to tell her tale. This compelling page-turner is a powerful read that will help eliminate the shame associated with being labeled a victim and that will raise awareness for this dirty secret that so many strong-willed women living with are afraid to talk about.
This is a definitely MUST READ BOOK for every woman out there. If you have teenage daughters, make sure they read it as well. Family Law Attorneys, this will be a great gift for your next client that has taken the first step to end their misery in a terrible relationship. Domestic violence is very real, very painful and unforgettable. I am so proud of our friend, Mekisha Jane Walker, for sharing her personal story and providing resources to help those in need.

Know My Name: A Memoir/Chanel Miller (Author)
She was known to the world as Emily Doe when she stunned millions with a letter. Brock Turner had been sentenced to just six months in county jail after he was found sexually assaulting her on Stanford's campus. Her victim impact statement was posted on BuzzFeed, where it instantly went viral--viewed by eleven million people within four days, it was translated globally and read on the floor of Congress; it inspired changes in California law and the recall of the judge in the case. Thousands wrote to say that she had given them the courage to share their own experiences of assault for the first time.
Now she reclaims her identity to tell her story of trauma, transcendence, and the power of words. It was the perfect case, in many ways--there were eyewitnesses, Turner ran away, physical evidence was immediately secured. But her struggles with isolation and shame during the aftermath and the trial reveal the oppression victims face in even the best-case scenarios. Her story illuminates a culture biased to protect perpetrators, indicts a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable, and, ultimately, shines with the courage required to move through suffering and live a full and beautiful life.
Know My Name will forever transform the way we think about sexual assault, challenging our beliefs about what is acceptable and speaking truth to the tumultuous reality of healing. It also introduces readers to an extraordinary writer, one whose words have already changed our world. Entwining pain, resilience, and humor, this memoir will stand as a modern classic.
Chosen as a BEST BOOK OF 2019 by The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, TIME, Elle, Glamour, Parade, Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, BookRiot

Violence against Women in Pornography/ Walter DeKeseredy (Author), Marilyn Corsianos (Author)
Violence against Women in Pornography illuminates the ways in which adult pornography hurts many women, both on and off screen. A growing body of social scientific knowledge shows that it is strongly associated with various types of violence against women in intimate relationships. Many women who try to leave abusive and/or patriarchal men also report that pornography plays a role in the abuse inflicted on them by their ex-partners. On top of these harms, male pornography consumption is strongly correlated with attitudes supporting violence against women. Many researchers, practitioners, and policy makers believe that adult pornography is a major problem and offer substantial evidence supporting this claim.
Violence against Women in Pornography, unlike books written mainly for scholarly and general audiences, specifically targets students enrolled in undergraduate criminology, deviance, women’s studies, masculinities studies, human sexuality, and media studies courses. Thoughtful discussion questions are placed at the end of each chapter, and appropriate PowerPoint slides and suggestions for classroom exercises will be available to aid student understanding. The main objective of this book is to motivate readers to think critically about adult pornography and to take progressive steps individually and collectively to curb the production and consumption of hurtful sexual media, including that from the "dark side of the Internet."

Cyber Crimes against Women in India/ Debarati Halder (Author), K Jaishankar
Cyber Crimes against Women in India reveals loopholes in the present laws and policies of the Indian judicial system, and what can be done to ensure safety in cyberspace.
The book is a signi­ficant contribution to socio-legal research on online crimes targeting teenage girls and women. It shows how they become soft targets of trolling, online grooming, privacy infringement, bullying, pornography, sexual defamation, morphing, spoofi­ng and so on.
The authors address various raging debates in the country such as how women can be protected from cybercrimes; what steps can be taken as prevention and as recourse to legal aid and how useful and accessible cyber laws are. The book provides detailed answers to a wide array of questions that bother scholars and charts a way forward.

Female Mutilation: The Truth Behind the Horrifying Global Practice of Female Genital Mutilation/ Hilary Burrage (Author)
The numbers of girls and women affected around the world are staggering. Death is not an uncommon outcome. Female genital mutilation (FGM) is the partial or complete removal of the external female genitals for cultural rather than medical or religious reasons―its origin is unknown. Practitioners believe the procedure enhances the girl’s health, hygiene, chastity, fertility and marriage prospects―the truth is it obliterates sexual pleasure, causes severe health problems and is sometimes fatal. This book covers this controversial cultural practice that is taking place around the world including in Western countries where it is illegal. Read the harrowing stories of women who have been genitally mutilated, their accounts of survival and their determination to end this injustice. Find out what is being done to combat this crime against women from those committed to see change.
(Hilary Burrage)

Ijeoma: A Mother's Journey to Save Her Daughters /Richard Sacks (Author)
Ijeoma: A Mother's Journey to Save Her Daughters focuses on eighteen-year-old Ijeoma, who is forced to undergo the ruthless act of tribal cutting as a condition of marriage to an abusive man who threatens the same on his daughters. Ijeoma, inspired by true events, follows Ijeoma as she leaves her Nigerian village for New York, vowing that what was forced on her will not happen to her children. But her plans are stalled after she is arrested and detained, awaiting a deportation that could send her and her daughters back across the ocean to a fate that is too horrific to bear.

Beautiful: A beautiful girl. An evil man. One inspiring true story of courage/Katie Piper (Author)
'I heard a horrible screaming sound, like an animal being slaughtered ... then I realised it was me.'
When Katie Piper was 24, her life was near perfect. Young and beautiful, she was well on her way to fulfilling her dream of becoming a model.
But then she met Daniel Lynch on Facebook and her world quickly turned into a nightmare ...
After being held captive and brutally raped by her new boyfriend, Katie was subjected to a vicious acid attack. Within seconds, this bright and bubbly girl could feel her looks and the life she loved melting away.
Beautiful is the moving true story of how one young woman had her mind, body and spirit cruelly snatched from her and how she inspired millions with her fight to get them back.

FATWA: Hunted in America/Pamela Geller (Author)
In FATWA: Hunted in America, Geller recounts the battle to defeat the sinister Ground Zero mosque project; the ISIS attack at Geller's Mohammed Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest in Garland, Texas; the fatwa issued to her and plot to behead her; and much more including the relentless vilification from a mainstream media hell-bent on defaming and destroying everyone who stands for freedom against jihad terror and sharia oppression.
"It's my story, but it's every story," Geller concludes. "Any lover of freedom would have been tarred the same way I was, and many have been. I am but a proxy in this terrible long war: what has happened to me is what happens, in small and large ways, to every American who stands for freedom."
Yet - as shown in this book - she has prevailed. Without Pamela Geller, there would be a 16-story mega-mosque at Ground Zero today. Without Pamela Geller, untold numbers of young women who are living free today would instead have been victims of honor killing. Without Pamela Geller, countless numbers of indefatigable fighters for freedom would have been cowed and intimidated into silence by an increasingly violent and authoritarian Left.

Honour Killing: Stories of Men Who Killed/ Ayse Onal (Author)
Honour killing persists around the Middle East, where regimes refrain from tackling primitive traditions for fear of sparking unrest. Ayse Onal interviewed imprisoned men in Turkey convicted of killing their mothers, sisters, and daughters. The result is a revealing and ultimately tragic account of ruined lives - both the victims' and the killers' - in a country where state and religion conspire to hush up the killing of hundreds of women every year. 'Ayse Onal has done an immense service by revealing what it is like to live in an honour-based society and the terrible cost, not just to the women who are beaten and eventually killed, but to the perpetrators and other relatives.' -- Joan Smith. 'A compelling, disturbing examination of a tradition that stubbornly persists in modern Turkey' -- Guardian

When Rape Becomes Acceptable: Corrective Rape in Jamaica /Kemone S.G. Brown (Author)
What would you do if your body had been violated? Would you have the will, the energy, and the drive to survive? What if the person who violated you believed that he was doing the right thing? After all, society had provided him with reasoning for his beliefs. What would you do if someone threatened to rape you and you had nowhere or no one to turn to, no one or system to protect you? “When Rape Becomes Acceptable” deals with the issues surrounding corrective rape in Jamaica. It follows the lives of ten women who were victims of corrective rape and illustrates how each woman or her loved ones is dealing with what happened. Some of these women had the will to survive, not in the sense that they are flourishing, but they continue to live, hiding in the shadows, hiding from society who they really are; the fear of being outed again and being subjected to another instance of “corrective rape” determining how they live their lives. However, some of them were not so “lucky”. They didn’t have the strength to deal with or come to grips with what happened to them, so instead of having to bear the burden of what happened, they decided to end the pain and the agony as it was much easier than continuing to live. Join them as each woman tells you her story and opens up her life, her scars, her pain, her suffering as she tries to cope in a society that has not only failed to protect her but has also given rise to the violation of her body.

Armed Survivor/ Christine Hand-Gonzales Ed.D. (Author)
An honorable citizen, a disturbed criminal, and a lifelong addiction to violence, control, and sexual abuse, were on the agenda. ARMED SURVIVOR is the true account of two lives on a horrific collision course. The story is filled with twists and turns, intrigue and suspense. Violence against women has reached epic proportions in the United States. In this case, a 30-year veteran school counselor and single woman appeared to take all the right precautions to live alone “safely.” Smart, aware, and responsible, this independent lady possesses the survivor’s instinct, but did she have what it would take to battle this demon?Unbeknownst to her, this stalker would watched from a distance. He tracked her every move, day and night, weekdays and weekends for several months. Lurking in the dark, this predator, a Cuban national, planned his attack. Had he done this before? Was he seeking asylum and sanctuary in the United States to avoid jail time in Cuba for pending rape and murder charges? It will become apparent that this convicted felon and pathological liar did not fear extradition, our legal system, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or the Department of Homeland Security. Had he found refuge and protection in "sanctuary cities?"Follow these two lives to understand how this freak encounter between two strangers occurred; then, learn how to protect yourself from such attacks.

I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced/Nujood Ali (Author)
“I’m a simple village girl who has always obeyed the orders of my father and brothers. Since forever, I have learned to say yes to everything. Today I have decided to say no.”
Nujood Ali's childhood came to an abrupt end in 2008 when her father arranged for her to be married to a man three times her age. With harrowing directness, Nujood tells of abuse at her husband's hands and of her daring escape. With the help of local advocates and the press, Nujood obtained her freedom—an extraordinary achievement in Yemen, where almost half of all girls are married under the legal age. Nujood's courageous defiance of both Yemeni customs and her own family has inspired other young girls in the Middle East to challenge their marriages.
Hers is an unforgettable story of tragedy, triumph, and courage.

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Casandra Brayton
Mar 5, 2021
Awareness needs to be brought and action needs to be taken. These soldiers risk their lives for us and we need to protect them

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ainex hernandez
Mar 1, 2021
You guys don’t take rape seriously

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Daniela Ochoa
Feb 28, 2021
what happened to her was unacceptable.

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Rusty Wills
Feb 27, 2021
Verna L. Wills

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Angela Oboyle
Feb 27, 2021
It's wrong for someone to have to go through something that traumatic especially if they are fighting for us they already go through enough being in the military and because I so have two older brothers in the military and are currently going through so much

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Leslie Bracamonte
Feb 27, 2021
I'm signing this because sexual harassment is not something to be taken lightly. I don't care if it's a women or a man who's causing these problems. The fact that a minor can see how horrible something like this is compared to adults is just ridiculous.

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T​.​J. Jenkins
Feb 27, 2021
I had family in the military.

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Andrew Blair
Feb 27, 2021
I’m signing this because I don’t want people to suffer and I want to help people