Petition Closed

               Converse describes itself as “a story of legends, heroes, and innovators tied together by the love of sport.” But ‘sport’ doesn’t include throwing sneakers at factory workers, right? Tell that to the supervisors at the Indonesian factories which produce Converse shoes who regularly throw sneakers at their employees. Maybe also add that just like sneakers aren’t for throwing, employees aren’t for slapping or calling pigs and dogs. Reports compiled by the Associated Press show that the factories subcontracted by Converse are operating far below the standards it had set for itself ten years ago. Nike, which owns the Converse brand, confirms these reports, stating that ⅔ of the factories fail to meet Nike standards. But they cannot address these problems, they insist, since these contracts were set before Nike bought Converse in 2003.
               Then how do they explain the Pou Chen Group factory in Sukabumi, 60 miles from Indonesia’s capital of Jakarta which didn’t start producing Converse products until 2007? At this plant, workers are kicked, slapped, scratched, fired for taking sick days and paid fifty cents and hour. At another plant outside the nation’s capital, a supervisor forced six women to stand unprotected under the sun for two hours for failing to produce the targeted 60 dozen pairs of shoes on time.
               Hannah Jones, Nike’s VP of Sustainable Business and Innovation who oversees the company’s efforts to improve working conditions, confirms these findings but states that "We do see other issues of that similar nature coming up across the supply chain but not on a frequent level," she said. "We see issues of working conditions on a less egregious nature across the board."
               How many sneakers have to be thrown for working conditions to be considered egregious Ms. Jones? How many workers abused or humiliated? Join us in demanding that Nike hold themselves accountable by:
               -Conducting far more aggressive and transparent investigations into the factories they are subcontracting to produce Converse products.
               -Suspending factories that they identify (or have already been identified) as below Nike standards (as stated in the Nike Responsibility: Workers and Factories and Nike Leadership Standard) until the factory owners and subcontractors take action to improve working conditions for employees, put managers through Nike leadership training, pass all working condition standards and report these revisions to the Nike task force.
               -Creating a transparent strategy to address labor violations in factories under existing contracts

Letter to
VP of Sustainable Business and Innovation at Nike Hannah Jones
Nike, Inc.
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Hannah Jones, VP of Sustainable Business and Innovation at Nike.

----------------
Nike: Stop Abusing Your Workers!

Nike prides itself on setting high standards for the factories and workers which produce its goods. It has set a Code of Conduct, Code of Leadership Standards and conducts regular, transparent audits of its factories. Why not extend these standards to the factories which produce Converse goods? The Code of Conduct of Converse, a Nike brand, demands that “Contractor’s employees are treated with respect and dignity. Employees are not subject to physical, sexual, psychological or verbal harassment or abuse” but both we and Nike know that that is not happening. Reports compiled by the Associated Press show that the factories subcontracted by Converse are operating far below standards it set for itself ten years ago. Nike confirms these reports, stating that ⅔ of the factories fail to meet Nike standards. But they cannot address these problems, they insist, since these contracts were set before Nike bought Converse in 2003.
But what about Pou Chen Group factory in Sukabumi, 60 miles from Indonesia’s capital of Jakarta which didn’t start producing Converse products until 2007? At this plant, workers are kicked, slapped, scratched, fired for taking sick days and paid fifty cents and hour. At another plant outside the nation’s capital, a supervisor forced six women to stand unprotected under the sun for two hours for failing to produce the targeted 60 dozen pairs of shoes on time.
How many sneakers have to be thrown for working conditions to be taken seriously by Nike? How many workers abused or humiliated? We demand that Nike holds itself responsible by:
-Conducting far more aggressive and transparent investigations into the factories they are subcontracting to produce Converse products.
-Suspending factories that they identify (or have already been identified) as below Nike standards (as stated in the Nike Responsibility: Workers and Factories and Nike Leadership Standard) until the factory owners and subcontractors take action to improve working conditions for employees, put managers through Nike leadership training, pass all working condition standards and report these revisions to the Nike task force.
-Creating a transparent strategy to address labor violations in factories under existing contracts

We urge you to take responsibility and ownership of these factories and see that the workers are treated with humanity and respect.

----------------

Sincerely,