SAVE BONA’S HOME!! SAY NO TO SEBLAT COAL MINING!

Reasons for signing

See why other supporters are signing, why this petition is important to them, and share your reason for signing (this will mean a lot to the starter of the petition).

Thanks for adding your voice.

Sean Hill
2 days ago
Sean Hill

Thanks for adding your voice.

Emilia Holina
Sep 5, 2021
This is gonna destroy not there homes but everyone’s

Thanks for adding your voice.

izabella halta
Sep 4, 2021
I wanna help

Thanks for adding your voice.

hannah mucignat
Sep 4, 2021
this is so important!!!!!

Thanks for adding your voice.

anggit hapsari
May 28, 2021
gajah juga butuh tempat tinggal!!! #savegajah

Thanks for adding your voice.

Mayla Fayza
May 28, 2021
We will save you

Thanks for adding your voice.

Catherine McLeod
1 year ago
we must stop this ecoside NOW.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Aron Saga
1 year ago
I’m signing this petition because we need to stop using coal as an energy source because it’s very bad for the environment and we also can’t keep destroying animals habitats

Thanks for adding your voice.

Adil Bona Halomoan Siregar
2 years ago
Sudah sangat sering kejadian seperti ini. Hanya karna perluasan lahan pertanian, perkebunan, industri dan kali ini terjadi lagi dari sektor pertambangan. Ini alasan yang sudah mainstream. Yang paling disayangkan itu pemerintah daerah ikut berpartner dengan memudahkan perizinan perluasan daerah pertambangan. Saya tidak tau bagaimana tepatnya proses pertimbangan perizinan tersebut. Yang saya tau jika sedikit demi sedikit lahan konservasi fauna dibabat dengan alasan untuk perluasan lahan industri, pertanian, perkebunan, dan pertambangan lama kelamaan hutan Indonesia akan terbabat habis dan yang dihasilkan hanya polusi dan polusi, dan itu tidak manusiawi.

Gajah adalah bagian dari makhluk sejarah yang masih hidup sampai saat ini. Mereka adalah alat transportasi di zaman peperangan. Saat ini malah sebaliknya, karna keserakahan sebagian orang-orang berkepentingan yang terjadi kelayakan hidup gajah semakin tidak jelas yang sangat riskan terhadap kepunahan.

Saya menolak tegas perluasan lahan ini. Saya berharap pemerinah pusat mempertimbangkan perizinan ini dan bila perlu menindak tegas pemerintah daerah yang apabila terlalu semena-mena mempermudah perizinan. Apalagi nama saya juga Bona. Saya tidak mau kembar saya ini merasa terancam. Terimakasih..

Thanks for adding your voice.

Anita Kanitz
2 years ago
"You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make." -- Jane Goodall

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything." -- Albert Einstein

If you really think that the environment is less important than the economy, try holding your breath while you count your money." -- Guy McPherson

"We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it." -- Jay Inslee

books about:

Rising-Dispatches from the New American Shore | Elizabeth Rush
In “Rising,” Elizabeth Rush takes readers to the physical and cultural edges of the country, from the marginalized and forgotten citizens of places like Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, to the glass castles of Facebook and Google in Silicon Valley. As high tide and massive storms become the new normal, those at the coasts, especially those with lower incomes, will be most at risk of flooding and all that comes with it. At stake are not just coastlines; entire communities stand to lose their homes and lifestyles to climate change, becoming the first of many climate refugees. The question is not a matter of if but when we lose these lands, and Rush explores how we cope with this knowledge.

The Ends of the World | Peter Brannen
Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions
As we stare down the barrel of our own (man-made) catastrophe, science journalist Pete Brannen takes us on a walk down memory lane over millions of years to examine the planet’s five mass extinctions. With paleontologists as our protagonists, “The Ends of the World” uses fossil records across the globe to autopsy our five mass extinctions and portend our future. While the topic might sound as dry as a fossilized trilobite, Brannen’s wit may leave you chuckling aloud, from Ordovician to Cretaceous — call it rock and droll.

How to Give Up Plastic | Will McCallum
A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time
Plastics are everyone’s problem, and unless we as individuals, governments and companies all share responsibility, we won’t solve ever solve it. In this book, Will McCallum, head of oceans at Greenpeace UK, frames the current state of global plastic pollution and the environmental consequences of our throwaway, single-use culture. Part history, part guide, “How to Give Up Plastic” helps us understand our plastics addiction while giving us practical, ambitious steps to correct it.

Storming the Wall | Todd Miller
Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security
It’s time to open our eyes to the economic and political implications of climate change. In “Storming the Wall,” Todd Miller tells the story of climate change refugees that have been forced from their homes and paints a larger picture of how wealthy countries like the United States are putting up walls, militarizing borders and bloating detention centers to restrict those seeking refuge and maintain the status quo of the haves and have nots.

The Uninhabitable Earth | David Wallace-Wells
Life After Warming
Need to get up-to-speed on our climate emergency? “The Uninhabitable Earth” may be the book for you. In 200-odd pages, columnist and editor David Wallace-Wells deftly unpacks the past, present and future of life in the time of anthropogenic global warming. Remarkably, Wallace-Wells’s prose manages to convey not only the urgency (and anxiety) of our environmental crisis, but the opportunity we still have to seize the solutions right in front of us and turn things around. First you’ll get scared straight; then you’ll get straight to work.

Losing Earth | Nathaniel Rich
A Recent History
“Losing Earth” explores the environmental decade that never was: 1979–89, when we knew all we needed to know about global warming to stop it. Tracing the political and scientific history of the climate crisis, Nathaniel Rich reports how the public, with scientific backing, lined up to tackle climate change — until a coordinated campaign by lobbyists, corporations and politicians cast doubt on the whole thing. We all know what happened next. To understand how we got to where we are, we must look to the shortcomings of our past. “Losing Earth” does just that.

Don’t Even Think About It | George Marshall
Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Why is our response to climate change so woeful? George Marshall explores how we make choices to act or ignore. And when it comes to climate change, it’s usually the latter. Climate change is a “wicked problem,” Marshall writes, a complicated challenge with no clear enemy and no silver-bullet solution. To tackle this problem and mobilize action, “Don’t Even Think About It” argues we need science, but just as importantly, we need emotional, compelling narratives.

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? | Frans de Waal
People have long assumed that complex thought and emotion were exclusive to humanity. Primatologist and ethologist Frans de Waal challenges this assumption, outlining the evolution of human understanding of animal cognition and exploring case studies of animal problem solving, tool use and social structures. This book is a source of provocative research findings, a history and critique of the field and a personal narrative of de Waal’s own career evolution. The result drives readers to reevaluate what it means to be intelligent while deepening their appreciation for the unique and diverse talents across the animal kingdom.

Keeping the Bees: Why All Bees Are at Risk and What We Can Do to Save Them/ Laurence Packer (Autor)
From the jungles of South America to the deserts of Arizona, one thing remains consistent: bees are disappearing. A world without bees would be much less colourful, with fewer flowers. But that’s not all-bees are responsible for up to one-third of our food supply, and the consequences of not taking action to protect them are frightening. While the media focuses on colony-collapse disorder and the threats to honey bees specifically, the real danger is much greater: all bees are at risk, whether it be from loss of habitat, pesticide use or disease, among other factors. And because of the integral role these insects play in the ecology of our planet, we may be at risk as well.
In Keeping the Bees, Laurence Packer, a melittologist whose life revolves around bees, debunks many myths about these creatures and takes us behind the scenes with scientists around the world who are working to save these fascinating creatures before it’s too late.

Salvage the Bones | Jesmyn Ward
Facts and figures may drive policy, but they rarely stir emotion with the strength that pure human storytelling can do. “Salvage the Bones” is the only work of fiction on this list, but author Jesmyn Ward comes from a place of enormous truth to tell the story of the Batiste family — bolstered by community, defined by pride and threatened by extreme heat and the battering of ever-stronger hurricanes. Like the book’s protagonist, 15-year-old Esch, Ward grew up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and lived through Hurricane Katrina, a category-5 hurricane that pummeled communities already made vulnerable by wetland degradation, local land subsistence and flooding. Ward’s prose rises above the cut-and-dried news coverage of the time to tell the story with a dignity and intensity that demonstrates all that we can create together and all that we stand to lose by climate change.

Where the Water Goes | David Owen
Life and Death Along the Colorado River
The Colorado River provides water for nearly 40 million people, but with climate change and booming populations, this river’s tap is close to running dry. David Owen takes us on a journey down this prized waterway, from the snowmelt atop the Rocky Mountains to the dried-up deserts of Mexico. After nearly a century of division by lawyers and politicians, overuse by farmers and cities and redirection by engineers and bureaucrats, the Colorado River’s resilience is waning. We’ve created this mess, but we can also pull ourselves out of it, Owen argues, before the tap runs completely dry.

This Radical Land | Daegan Miller
A Natural History of Dissent
When most still believed the natural world was a limitless resource for the taking, early environmentalists saw an ideal in which humans could coexist with the natural world, rather than exploiting it. Through a series of essays, Daegan Miller highlights efforts to bring together ideals of environmental justice, conservation and sustainable development at a time in history when American progress was viewed through the lens of unhindered extraction and expansion. This journey into the earliest beginnings of environmentalism is a reminder that radical, innovative ideas have always been a part of the effort to live in harmony with our planet.

Merchants of Doubt | Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. Conway
In “Merchants of Doubt,” Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway draw a direct line between the tobacco industry’s initial response to secondhand smoke and our contemporary way of thinking about science, specifically global warming. As the books explains, a few industry-backed scientists led a coordinated campaign to cast doubt on science: Cherry-picking facts, misrepresenting views and celebrating unregulated capitalism as inherently American. It’s a common theme in our history and one that is still playing out today: Thanks to a few very powerful people, facts have been misconstrued and the public misguided in favor of unregulated, corporate-friendly ventures. Meanwhile, global warming has accelerated and so, too, has our own doubt about it.

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes | Dan Egan
Since their settlement in the 1800s, the Great Lakes have undergone a destructive transformation by pollution and invasive species, the latter a byproduct of various engineering feats throughout the 20th century. Egan traces the roots and progress of these environmental challenges, as well as the hazardous social, economic and political problems they’ve caused. What’s at stake is the largest body of freshwater in the world, a precious environmental resource home to diverse ecosystems and depended upon by hundreds of thousands. It’s our job to protect it.

Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth about the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity/ James Hansen (Autor)
Dr James Hansen, the world's leading scientist on climate issues, speaks out for the first time with the full truth about global warming: the planet is hurtling to a climatic point of no return. Hansen - whose climate predictions have come to pass again and again, beginning in the 1980s when he first warned US Congress about global warming - is the single most credible voice on the subject worldwide.
He paints a devastating but all-too-realistic picture of what will happen if we continue to follow the course we're on. But he is also a hard-headed optimist, and shows that there is still time to take the urgent, strong action needed to save humanity.

The West Without Water - What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow/ Lynn Ingram (Autor)
The West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources. Looking at the region’s current water crisis from the perspective of its climate history, the authors ask the central question of what is normal climate for the West, and whether the relatively benign climate of the past century will continue into the future.
The West without Water merges climate and paleoclimate research from a wide variety of sources as it introduces readers to key discoveries in cracking the secrets of the regions climatic past. It demonstrates that extended droughts and catastrophic floods have plagued the West with regularity over the past two millennia and recounts the most disastrous flood in the history of California and the West, which occurred in 1861-62. The authors show that, while the West may have temporarily buffered itself from such harsh climatic swings by creating artificial environments and human landscapes, our modern civilization may be ill-prepared for the future climate changes that are predicted to beset the region. They warn that it is time to face the realities of the past and prepare for a future in which fresh water may be less reliable.

Beyond the Outback: Gulf Women of Remote North West Queensland/Bronwyn Blake (Autor)
Twenty women share their incredible stories of surviving and thriving in the remote Australian 'Gulf Country', near the Gulf of Carpentaria.
Gulf women are self-sufficient, generous, and can cope with almost anything that life and the environment throws at them: floods, drought, sickness, emergencies. Whether they are graziers, fisherwomen, ringers, women in tourism, aviation and education, Indigenous women or descendants from early women settlers, this powerful book gives these women a voice to tell their own stories.
There are stories of new mothers on properties isolated and inaccessible for months in the wet season; women giving birth at home with only neighbours to assist; reminiscences from last century and World War II, and accounts of fishing in the Gulf in sometimes unimaginable conditions. From the kids wanting a baby croc for a pet to the terror of a snake bite with a flooded airstrip and impassable roads, these women treat the extraordinary events in their lives as just part of their remote way of life.
Set in a world of vast landscapes, distance and merciless climate, Beyond the Outback contains riveting tales of the lives of the women who live, work and raise families in one of Australia's most isolated regions. It will be loved by readers of Sara Henderson, Toni Tapp Coutts and Terry Underwood.
Plasticity Island (Book 1 in the Hard Science Fiction Techno-thriller "Plasticity Island" Series): The Water Wars/Warren Roberts (Autor)
In the middle of the North Pacific Gyre, the accelerated impacts of Global Climate Change have expanded the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to epic proportions.
Brent Brodie was an oil and gas engineer until he suffered catastrophic mental and physical injuries during an oil rig explosion. After years of recovery, he focuses his unique skills to lead the development of a floating, plastic recycling plant which grows into a star-shaped, two-mile wide, rotating island. Utilizing the gyre’s powerful ocean currents, Plasticity Island generates massive amounts of hydroelectricity which powers the Recycling, Fabrication and Desalination Plants.
In the very near future, as most of the world runs out of fresh drinking water, Plasticity Island’s Water Tanker Drones come under attack from Chinese Pirates and Mexican Drug Cartels. With his back against the wall, Brent and his team go on the offensive to protect their people and freshwater supplies. In a world of Artificial Intelligence, Drones and Humanoid Robots, high-tech and low-tech collide to change the face of our planet forever.

books about for kids and teens:

Alaskan Chronicles, The: The Provider (Alaskan Chronicles 1)/
When a solar storm throws the world into chaos, teenager Jim is forced to step up to survive in the wilds of Alaska.
The Alaskan Chronicles is an epic tale on one family's struggle to survive in an unforgiving and unremitting landscape. This story instantly pulled me in and took me right into the wilderness. It dragged me into confrontations with wild animals and also with the seasons that were breathtaking in their realisation. The true to life writing style brings the story to life in sparkling detail and brings this epic, wild and dangerous landscape into sharp relief. It is in that accurate and beautifully descriptive detail that the strength of the storytelling shows. Vivid descriptions of a world, then a society falling apart, with all the problems that brings. Then swiftly followed by the breakdown of that society and all the flaws in human nature that brings out. When stripped of our constructs of civilisation, we must get back to nature, or die, and on her terms. A wonderful triumph of a story, epic and detailed, harsh and yet human, a tour-de-force of creative writing. I am really looking forward to the next instalment of Jim's adventure.--Stephen Oakes, author

Breathe (Breathe Trilogy)/Sarah Crossan (Autor)
Years after the Switch, life inside the Pod has moved on. A poor Auxiliary class cannot afford the oxygen tax which supplies extra air for running, dancing and sports. The rich Premiums, by contrast, are healthy and strong. Anyone who opposes the regime is labelled a terrorist and ejected from the Pod to die.
Sixteen-year-old Alina is part of the secret resistance, but when a mission goes wrong she is forced to escape from the Pod. With only two days of oxygen in her tank, she too faces the terrifying prospect of death by suffocation. Her only hope is to find the mythical Grove, a small enclave of trees protected by a hardcore band of rebels. Does it even exist, and if so, what or who are they protecting the trees from?

Dry /Neal Shusterman (Autor)/ Jarrod Shusterman (Autor)
When the California drought escalates to catastrophic proportions, one teen is forced to make life and death decisions for her family in this harrowing story of survival from New York Times bestselling author Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.

The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers.
Until the taps run dry.
Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbors and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.

How to Save the Planet: The Easy Eco Friendly Zero-Waste Idea Book for Kids /Emily Bunny (Autor)
Children will love this book, full of bright and beautiful illustrations to accompany the educational rhymes on each page. Inside you can learn about some of the best and easiest ways you can make a difference to the planet and reduce the amount of plastic thrown away.

Our House Is on Fire: Greta Thunberg's Call to Save the Planet/Jeanette Winter (Autor, Illustrator)
From acclaimed picture book creator Jeanette Winter comes the urgent and powerful story of Greta Thunberg, the sixteen-year-old climate activist who has sparked a worldwide student movement and is demanding action from world leaders who refuse to address climate change.

Greta and the Climate Crisis/ Paul Rockett (Autor)
Be inspired by one of the world's most important and influential campaigners!
Discover the story of Greta, from her decision to skip school in favour of her one-person strike outside Swedish parliament, to her current role as a spearhead of an international movement. Follow her carbon-free journey across the world, where she met world leaders, addressed the UN and called out trolls. As well as this, understand he perspective on difference, such as her Asperger's being a superpower.
This book not only shows her rise and outlines her campaigning agenda but also explains in clear detail what climate change is, the damage that is happening and what we need to do to ensure the planet is habitable and sustainable for future generations. Understand the science behind the climate crisis and our responsibility to the planet - a responsibility that has been largely neglected by previous generations.

The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
/Jan Thornhill
Great Auks were flightless birds that resembled penguins. They were prolific in the icy waters of the northern Atlantic until human hunters, egg collectors, and climate change led to their extinction. Unfortunately, many other bird species are on a similar path. “The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk” is a beautifully designed picture book that reminds us how precious life is – all life. Booklist says, “This vivid, fascinating story emphasizes not only the importance of conservation but also how deeply intertwined the human and animal worlds can be. Eye-opening and tragic, to be sure, but surprisingly hopeful all the same.”

The Problem of the Hot World
/ Pam Bonsper
The trees have stopped growing. The grass is all gone. The world is too hot, and there’s no more water to drink. When the forest world is turned upside down, how will the animals survive? Five friends – a fox, a bear, an owl, a mole, and a deer – set out on a journey to find where the water has gone. Can they bring it back? “The book has a lovely forest setting with recognizable animals, very interesting and charming illustrations (in perfect synergy with the story), and tells the story of environmental changes in a very simple, friendly, serene way,” says one Amazon reviewer.

It’s Your World
/ Chelsea Clinton
“The New York Times” bestselling book of empowerment for kids, written by Chelsea Clinton, includes an important message on the environment. With facts, charts, photographs, and stories, readers walk away with a deeper understanding of our earth and how to act to protect it. “Taking an upbeat, positive approach, former First Daughter Clinton stresses the importance of being proactive and involved when it comes to current events. She includes many examples of children and teens who have made a difference, and each chapter ends with a list of concrete actions readers can take,” says School Library Journal.

Global Warming
/ Seymour Simon
Global warming may be an outdated term, but this book from award-winning science writer Seymour Simon is still highly relevant. The vibrant full-page, full-color photographs provide an up-close introduction concerning the facts surrounding climate change.

It’s Getting Hot in Here
/ Bridget Heos
Author Bridget Heos tackles climate change head-on in this informative book written for a teen audience. Heos explains the history and science behind what’s causing our planet to warm and details the way humans have played a dominant role in its acceleration. Publisher’s Weekly says, “Well-researched and comprehensible, ‘It’s Getting Hot in Here’ is an alarming, but never alarmist, examination of a critical topic.”

Eyes Wide Open
/ Paul Fleischman
Meant for older readers, “Eyes Wide Open” is a call to action that instructs teens and young adults on how they can evaluate the issues surrounding our environment using a combination of media, politics, and history. This guide is a must-read for young minds seeking to make a difference.

Books Featuring Endangered, Threatened, or Extinct Animals:

Hope for Animals and Their World: How Endangered Species Are Being Rescued from the Brink
/ Jane Goodall,Thane Maynard, Gail Hudson
From world-renowned scientist Jane Goodall, as seen in the new National Geographic documentary Jane, comes an inspiring message about the future of the animal kingdom.
With the insatiable curiosity and conversational prose that have made her a bestselling author, Goodall - along with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard - shares fascinating survival stories about the American Crocodile, the California Condor, the Black-Footed Ferret, and more; all formerly endangered species and species once on the verge of extinction whose populations are now being regenerated.
Interweaving her own first-hand experiences in the field with the compelling research of premier scientists, Goodall illuminates the heroic efforts of dedicated environmentalists and the truly critical need to protect the habitats of these beloved species. At once a celebration of the animal kingdom and a passionate call to arms, HOPE FOR ANIMALS THEIR WORLD presents an uplifting, hopeful message for the future of animal-human coexistence.

The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat / Charles Clover
Gourmands and health-conscious consumers alike have fallen for fish; last year per capita consumption in the United States hit an all-time high. Packed with nutrients and naturally low in fat, fish is the last animal we can still eat in good conscience. Or can we?
In this vivid, eye-opening book—first published in the UK to wide acclaim and now extensively revised for an American audience—environmental journalist Charles Clover argues that our passion for fish is unsustainable. Seventy-five percent of the world’s fish stocks are now fully exploited or overfished; the most popular varieties risk extinction within the next few decades.
Clover trawls the globe for answers, from Tokyo’s sumptuous fish market to the heart of New England’s fishing industry. He joins hardy sailors on high-tech boats, interviews top chefs whose menu selections can influence the fate of entire species, and examines the ineffective organizations charged with regulating the world’s fisheries. Along the way he argues that governments as well as consumers can take steps to reverse this disturbing trend before it’s too late. The price of a mouthwatering fillet of Chilean sea bass may seem outrageous, but The End of the Line shows its real cost to the ecosystem is far greater.


Endangered Animals: A Reference Guide to Conflicting Issues
/ Richard P. Reading, Brian Miller
Our planet is losing its diversity of life at a rate unparalleled in recent times (see Wilson 1988). As human population and needs (real or perceived) expand, the globe becomes scarred by a deadly scythe. The habitats we increasingly harvest, such as tropical forests and wetlands, are often the crucibles of biotic richness. Is this loss simply fate? Are Homo sapiens following some specific manifest destiny? Should people just accept the trend and go about their daily business? After all, don’t people simply represent one species on the planet, all of which are struggling for survival?
Many adopt that attitude. It is certainly the easy path. After all, no matter how apocalyptic the outcome, the process is so slow (at least on human time scales) that it is nearly imperceptible. Also, each generation of increasingly urbanized populations throughout the world moves farther from nature. A few people may notice that the howl of a wolf no longer floats over the hills or that the springtime song of their favorite prairie bird rings less frequently than in their youth. But by and large, many lost life forms are too distant and obscure to be missed, and in thousands to millions of cases the forms may be gone before they are even known to science.
Yet there is a myriad of people who find this trend unacceptable. The stories of some of those people are encapsulated in this book. Issues that surround the dramatic declines of species are complex, often conflict-laden, and not easy to reverse. However, one can learn from past practices, improve performance, and avoid the problems common to endangered species conservation. To that end, this volume provides 49 case studies of subspecies, species, or groups of species that have been pushed to the brink of extinction. The contributing authors have dedicated an incredible amount of time and effort toward preserving the organisms about which they write, and they describe the controversies and complexities of each struggle. They do not want to be part of a modern extinction spasm, in which a large number of species go extinct in a relatively short period of time.

Endangered Animals: Discover Why Some of the World's Creatures Are Dying Out and What We Can Do to Protect Them / Ben Hoare (Author)
Eyewitness: Endangered Animals takes a look at creatures around the world that are currently threatened with extinction, along with the ways that we can help them survive. Starting with an overview of biodiversity and the web of life, the book then examines the threats facing a wide range of species, including polar bears, sea turtles, tree frogs, river dolphins, jaguars, pandas, gibbons, and the California condor.