Petition update

REMOVE THE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS ON ALL FORMS OF CHILD ABUSE.

Justice for the Forgotten & Future Americans

Jan 23, 2019 — 

REMOVING THE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS IN ALL FORMS IS THE ULTIMATE GOAL. BUT A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION IS THE CHILD VICTIMS ACT BILL. IT ONLY REMOVES THE STATUE OF LIMITATIONS ON SEXUAL ABUSE. PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION TO REMOVE ALL THE STATUE OF LIMITATIONS ON ALL FORMS OF CHILD ABUSE AND SUPPORT PASSING OF THE CHILD VICTIMS  

JUSTICE for the FORGOTTEN and FUTURE AMERICANS INC.

Help Bring Justice to Victims of Child Abuse.

Past, Present and Future

WEBSITE: https://www.justicefortheforgottenandfutureamericans.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JUSTICEFORTHEFORGOTTENANDFUTUREAMERICANS/

I am contacting you to raise awareness and help make a positive change concerning Victims of Child Abuse. There is a bill being purposed before Senate that will REMOVE the statute of limitations on Child Abuse.Child Victim’s Act Senate Bill S809 2017-2018 Legislative SessionRevives Civil Actions for certain sex offenses committed against a person less than eighteen years of age

 THIS BILL SPONSORED BY Brad Hoylman (D, WF) 27TH SENATE DISTRICT

According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control Prevention)Child Abuse and Neglect Consequences:

Child abuse and neglect affect children’s health now and later, and costs to our country are significant. Neglect, physical abuse, custodial interference, and sexual abuse are types of child maltreatment that can lead to poor physical and mental health well into adulthood. The physical, psychological, behavioral and economic consequences of child maltreatment are explained below.

1 in 4 children suffer abuse.

An estimated 702,000 children were confirmed by child protective services as being victims of abuse and neglect in 2014.1 At least one in four children have experienced child neglect or abuse (including physical, emotional, and sexual) at some point in their lives, and one in seven children experienced abuse or neglect in the last year.2

Effects: Child abuse and neglect affect children now and later.·         Improper brain development, Impaired cognitive (learning ability) and socio-emotional (social and emotional) skills. Lower language development. Blindness, cerebral palsy from head trauma. Higher risk for heart, lung and liver diseases, obesity, cancer, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Anxiety,Smoking, alcoholism and drug abuse

Physical

·         In 2014, approximately 1,580 children died from abuse and neglect across the country—a rate of 2.13 deaths per 100,000 children.1 Abuse and neglect during infancy or early childhood can cause regions of the brain to form and function improperly with long-term consequences on cognitive and language abilities, socioemotional development, and mental health.3 For example, the stress of chronic abuse may cause a “hyperarousal” response in certain areas of the brain, which may result in hyperactivity and sleep disturbances.4,5

·         Children may experience severe or fatal head trauma as a result of abuse. Nonfatal consequences of abusive head trauma include varying degrees of visual impairment (e.g., blindness), motor impairment (e.g., cerebral palsy) and cognitive impairments.6

·         Children who experience abuse and neglect are also at increased risk for adverse health effects and certain chronic diseases as adults, including heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, liver disease, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high levels of C-reactive protein.7,8,9

Psychological

·         In one long-term study, as many as 80% of young adults who had been abused met the diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder at age 21. These young adults exhibited many problems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and suicide attempts.10 The stress of chronic abuse may result in anxiety and may make victims more vulnerable to problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, conduct disorder, and learning, attention, and memory difficulties.4,5

Behavioral

·         Children who experience abuse and neglect are at increased risk for smoking, alcoholism, and drug abuse as adults, as well as engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors.7,11

·         Those with a history of child abuse and neglect are 1.5 times more likely to use illicit drugs, especially marijuana, in middle adulthood.12 Studies have found abused and neglected children to be at least 25% more likely to experience problems such as delinquency, teen pregnancy, and low academic achievement.13 Similarly, a longitudinal study found that physically abused children were at greater risk of being arrested as juveniles, being a teen parent, and less likely to graduate high school.14

·         A National Institute of Justice study indicated that being abused or neglected as a child increased the likelihood of arrest as a juvenile by 59%. Abuse and neglect also increased the likelihood of adult criminal behavior by 28% and violent crime by 30%.15

·         Child abuse and neglect can have a negative effect on the ability of both men and women to establish and maintain healthy intimate relationships in adulthood.16

Economic

·         The total lifetime economic burden resulting from new cases of fatal and nonfatal child abuse and neglect in the United States in 2008 is approximately $124 billion in 2010 dollars. This economic burden rivals the cost of other high profile public health problems, such as stroke and Type 2 diabetes.17

·         The estimated average lifetime cost per victim of nonfatal child abuse and neglect was $210,012 (in 2010 dollars), including

o    Childhood health care costs

o    Adult medical costs

o    Productivity losses

o    Child welfare costs

o    Criminal justice costs

o    Special education costs

The estimated average lifetime cost per death is $1,272,900, including medical costs and productivity losses.17Research suggests the benefits of effective prevention likely outweigh the costs of child abuse and neglect.

The Bill states:

AN ACT to amend the civil practice law and rules, the criminal procedure law, the court of claims act and the general municipal law, in relation to the timeliness for commencing certain civil actions related to sex offenses

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEM- BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: 1 Section 1. The opening paragraph of section 208 of the civil practice 2 law and rules is designated subdivision (a) and a new subdivision (b) is 3 added to read as follows:

 4 (B) NOTWITHSTANDING THE PROVISIONS OF SUBDIVISION (A) OF THIS SECTION, 5 WITH RESPECT TO ALL CIVIL CLAIMS OR CAUSES OF ACTION BROUGHT BY ANY 6 PERSON FOR PHYSICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL OR OTHER INJURY OR CONDITION SUFFERED 7 BY SUCH PERSON WHO WAS EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE OR LESS AS A RESULT OF 8 CONDUCT WHICH WOULD CONSTITUTE A SEXUAL OFFENSE AS DEFINED IN:

ARTICLE 9 ONE HUNDRED THIRTY OF THE PENAL LAW COMMITTED AGAINST SUCH PERSON WHO 10 WAS LESS THAN EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE, INCEST AS DEFINED IN SECTION 11 255.25, 255.26 OR 255.27 OF THE PENAL LAW COMMITTED AGAINST SUCH PERSON 12 WHO WAS LESS THAN EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE, OR THE USE OF SUCH PERSON IN A 13 SEXUAL PERFORMANCE AS DEFINED IN SECTION 263.05 OF

THE PENAL LAW, OR A 14 PREDECESSOR STATUTE THAT PROHIBITED SUCH CONDUCT AT THE TIME OF THE ACT, 15 WHICH CONDUCT WAS COMMITTED AGAINST SUCH PERSON WHO WAS LESS THAN EIGHT- 16 TEEN YEARS OF AGE, SUCH ACTION MAY BE COMMENCED AT ANY TIME.

17 S 2. The civil practice law and rules is amended by adding a new 18 section 214-g to read as follows: 19 S 214-G. CERTAIN CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE CASES. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY 20 PROVISION OF LAW WHICH IMPOSES A PERIOD OF LIMITATION TO THE CONTRARY.


In the words of our once great President Ronald Reagan “We’re blessed with the opportunity to stand for something. For liberty, freedom and fairness. These are things worth fighting for, worth devoting our lives to. "

SO LET’S STAND FOR SOMETHING GREAT! HELP MAKE A POSITIVE CHANGE!

Many groups/organizations have been very diligently pushing to have this bill passed for over 25 years. The Child Victim’s Act, Senate Bill S809 has passed in the New York State Assembly again this year. The next step is getting the bill to be voted on the Senate level. The problem is Republican Leader Senator John J. Flanagan has decided year after year not to allow the bill to the Senate floor to even be voted upon. It is very important to show your support of the Child Victim’s Act Senate Bill S809.

Please Contact your local Senator directly, voice your support why this bill should be passed.

Contact:

Andrew M. Cuomo

Governor of New York State NYS State

Capitol Building Albany, NY 12224

(518) 474-8390

Email: gov.cuomo@chamber.state.ny.us

 

Senator John J. Flanagan:

DISTRICT OFFICE

Address: 260 Middle Country Rd Suite 102,

Smithtown, NY 11787

Phone: (631) 361-2154

Email: flanagan@nysenate.gov

 

ALBANY OFFICE

Room 330, State Capitol Building

Albany, NY 11247

Phone: 518-455-2071

Email: flanagan@nysenate.gov

Together we can help make a difference. Please Email, Call & Sign the Petition.

Please Help Pass The Child Victim’s Act, Senate Bill S809.

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Please help me make a positive change for the innocent children, the forgotten and the future.

 

 


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