Petition Closed

Since Nixon was president, the U.S. has invested in public health programs to enable low income individuals to access contraception and some other reproductive health services. Recent debates have focused on one of the providers of these services – Planned Parenthood – though little has been said about the other key providers, state agencies and county health departments. Some in the House of Representatives have tried to eliminate funding for these cost- effective services.

Even with the expansion of health care coverage for people – including preventive health services for women – 30 million people will still be without health care coverage. Millions will still need some help in paying for primary care services, including contraception, breast exams, Pap tests and STD screening and treatment. These preventive services can improve women’s health and reduce the need for abortion. Six in ten women who obtain health care from a family planning center consider it to be their usual source of health care. And for budget watchers – spending a little money to prevent an unintended pregnancy saves about 4 times as much in other health care costs we all pay for.

The Title X (that’s a roman numeral 10) program supports services for 5 million women and men through 98 public and private nonprofit grantees in nearly 4,300 service delivery sites across the country. State, county, and local health departments make up the majority of Title X service providers -- hospitals and other private non-profit organizations make up the rest.

Sign my petition asking Jim Lehrer, moderator of the first presidential debate to dig a little deeper on the issue of contraceptive access. How do the candidates want to address the fact that nearly half of all pregnancies don’t happen on purpose? Should helping families plan for having the number of children they want and can afford be part of promoting economic growth? We want to know more about where they really stand.

Letter to
Jim Lehrer, Debate Moderator Jim Lehrer, Presidential Debate Moderator
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Jim Lehrer, Presidential Debate Moderator.


Dear Mr. Lehrer,

In your unique role of being able to ask questions of the candidates on behalf of all of us, we urge you to dig a little deeper on issues of women’s health – specifically contraceptive access. We know where the candidates stand on funding for Planned Parenthood – but there is more to know about their positions on contraceptive access and we urge you to explore this issue.

Since Nixon was president, the U.S. has invested in public health programs to enable low income individuals to access contraception and some other primary health care services. Recent debates have focused on one of the providers of these services – Planned Parenthood – though little has been said about the other key providers, state agencies and county health departments. The typical American woman spends 30 years avoiding pregnancy, yet some in the House of Representatives have tried to eliminate funding for these cost effective services.

Even with the expansion of health care coverage, about 30 million people will still be without coverage and will need some help in paying for primary care services, including contraception, breast exams, Pap tests and STD screening and treatment. Six in ten women who obtain health care from a family planning center consider it to be their usual source of health care.

The Title X (ten) program supports services for more than 5.2 million women and men through 89 public and private nonprofit grantees in nearly 4,400 service delivery sites across the country. State, county, and local health departments make up the majority (55%) of Title X service providers -- hospitals, family planning councils, and other private non-profit organizations make up the rest.

Nearly half of pregnancies in this country are unintended – especially those among women in their 20s. Unintended pregnancies prevent individuals from finishing high school and college – interrupting their efforts to create a solid economic footing for themselves and their families. The added health risks for women and children connected with unintended pregnancies have long-term negative impacts. A major factor contributing to this is the cost barriers to effective contraceptive methods.

What do the candidates plan to do to address these issues? Where do they stand on supporting access to contraception for women? What is their view on the federal role? Should helping families plan for having the number of children they want and can afford be part of promoting economic growth? We want to know – and count on you to help us find out their views.

Thank you in advance and we’ll be eager to hear the answers.

----------------

Sincerely,