Go back to Go Forward bring Skills based Lessons back into the Curriculum

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Veronica Hill
2 years ago
Kids today just don't have any hands on skills. Teach the boys to cook and iron and teach girls how to change plugs and put shelves up..just an example.

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Rachel Joy
3 years ago
I agree wholeheartedly.

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Karen Harvey
3 years ago
My son’s secondary school taught these skills up to Key Stage 3 but the programme became skewed to the Bacculaureate after that. Even if children are academic, this isn’t always their passion and - as a consequence - we lose many professional teachers. Yes, we need accountability to progress children to expect the best education but not at the expense of those who can benefit from alternatives. Possibly, we should be promoting choices where schools aren’t competing against other schools just on academic results.

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Sally Harding
3 years ago
Three of my four children have struggled with the senior school environment. The pressure to perform and succeed so the school looks good is overwhelming. Far too much emphasis is placed on academic achievement.

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helen chapman
3 years ago
ALL children deserve a chance to be who they are, all skills included

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Helen Mantell
3 years ago
We need to acknowledge the fact that not all children thrive when given a rigorous, academic curriculum. Many children switch off when presented with this kind of learning and then struggle to develop their wide ranging and valuable practical and creative skills which would bring immense value to society. Furthermore, the sense of demoralisation that they feel because of such a limited education, which only places value on the academic, can lead to low self esteem, depression and even trauma (yes, I have seen this and a very dear colleague specialises in treating adults that were traumatised through this kind of education).

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catherine bowman-shaw
3 years ago
I totally agree with it. Put the child at the centre of education. It is or was apparently for their benefit.

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Jill Wigley
3 years ago
I have spent my life teaching in primary schools, the final 10yrs as a specialist in Dyslexia and school SENCO. I have seen how the curriculum has taken over as being subject centred and goal orientated, rather than child centred and have taught children who, not being naturally academic, struggle with 3hrs of Literacy and Numeracy every morning. The pace is too fast for them and there is little consolidation time. Once they start to drop behind they become disaffected and this becomes a downward spiral causing sometimes disruptive behaviour, sometimes shutting off and always an unhappy, demotivated child. However these children CAN learn if their learning style, interests and self belief are all engaged. We need a skilled worforce, a balance between jobs which require an intellectual approach and those that require an aptitude for practical skills. Where is the sense in forcing the latter to try to achieve the former? We do not insist that academically inclined children spend hours struggling to learn a practical skill they have little aptitude for or interest in. Of course all children need to be able, at a basic literate and numerate level, but teaching grammatical terms such as the meaning of a conjunction or subordinate clause, to all primary school children is inappropriate for many and trying to ensure all children can repeat multiplication tables is unrealistic - some simply cannot remember long sequences, usually those with a poor auditory memory. Why are we not bringing out their strengths, instead of teaching to their weaknesses and reinforcing poor self esteem?

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Lynda Britton
3 years ago
It's really essential we offer young people skills-based education.

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K Anderson-Scott
3 years ago
Skills are skills! Let us not be so blinkered to think only academic ones matter.