Petition Closed
Petitioning Philip Hemminghaus and 9 others

Eliminate experience requirements for qualifying party applicator's license


A qualifying party (QP) applicator's license allows a person to apply RESTRICTED and UNRESTRICTED pesticides within a pesticide category. It also allows the licensed person to supervise, train and otherwise manage licensed applicators who will be handling and applying the same pesticides.

The first issue with 3000 hours of experience in category is that it is arbitrary and excessive and clearly a barrier to entry. Other industries with life safety concerns have much low experience requirements. To put this in perspective, think about commercial pilots. To become a commercial pilot carrying passengers for pay (commercial multiengine rating), you only need 250 hours of flight experience logged – pilots keep a log of hours flown in a personal logbook – and only a small number of those hours require an instructor while the rest of the hours are on your own. If a plane crashes, people die. In the case of an airliner, lots of people die. Clearly, planes are not falling out of the sky and killing lots of people due to lack of experience.

Another issue is that if you already work for a company, expanding your QP applicator’s license to a new category is very difficult if that company is not already performing the work you want to be licensed for. Essentially, you must quit the company you work for and go to work for a competing company to gain the experience. If you happen to be a company owner, you are essentially required to close your company and go work for one of your competitors – and your competitors may have no interest in hiring you. The experience requirement limits the ability of a company to expand into other categories of pest control and presents a significant barrier to entry.

Another issue is lack of reciprocity. Experience gained in one state does not count in this state. The person does not loose experience just because the person crosses the Arizona border but because of the current laws, the person is essentially required to start over. This is a significant barrier to entry.

The pest control industry also has a significant gender bias issue – it is a male dominated industry. There are very few female applicators and business owners. This makes it more difficult for women to get hired and gain the required experience to expand their licenses.

The experience requirement benefits existing companies by blocking new companies from coming into the pest control industry or preventing existing companies from expanding into new areas of pest control.  It blocks competition.

Our solution is simple. The emphasis should be on good educational materials and comprehensive testing. Anyone should be able to study the materials and take the license test without any waiting period or a minimum of required experience. A comprehensive test will show that the applicant has the required set of skills.

See http://its-our-turn.com/ for detailed white papers on the Arizona pest control industry.

Letter to
Philip Hemminghaus
Its-Our-Turn.com
John Boelts
and 7 others
Dave Burns
Lin Evans
Jimmy Fox
Ken Fredrick
Will Rousseau
Kirk Smith
OPM TF Jack Peterson
I just signed the following petition addressed to: OPM Task Force.

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Eliminate experience requirement for qualifying party applicator's license

A qualifying party (QP) applicator's license allows a person to apply RESTRICTED and UNRESTRICTED pesticides within a pesticide category. It also allows the licensed person to supervise, train and otherwise manage licensed applicators who will be handling and applying the same pesticides.

The first issue with 3000 hours of experience in category is that it is arbitrary and excessive and clearly a barrier to entry. Other industries with life safety concerns have much low experience requirements. To put this in perspective, think about commercial pilots. To become a commercial pilot carrying passengers for pay (commercial multiengine rating), you only need 250 hours of flight experience logged – pilots keep a log of hours flown in a personal logbook – and only a small number of those hours require an instructor while the rest are on your own. If a plane crashes, people die. In the case of an airliner, lots of people die. Clearly, planes are not falling out of the sky and killing lots of people due to lack of experience.

Another issue is that if you already work for a company, expanding your QP applicator’s license to a new category is very difficult if that company is not already performing the work you want to be licensed for. Essentially, you must quit the company you work for and go to work for a competing company to gain the experience. If you happen to be a company owner, you are essentially required to close your company and go work for one of your competitors – and your competitors may have no interest in hiring you. The experience requirement limits the ability of a company to expand into other categories of pest control and presents a significant barrier to entry.

Another issue is lack of reciprocity. Experience gained in one state does not count in this state. The person does not loose experience just because the person crosses a border but because of the current laws, the person is essentially required to start over. This is a significant barrier to entry.

The pest control industry also has a significant gender bias issue – it is a male dominated industry. There are very few female applicators and business owners. This makes it more difficult for women to get hired and gain the required experience to expand their licenses.

Our solution is simple. The emphasis should be on good educational materials and comprehensive testing. Anyone should be able to study the materials and take the license test without any waiting period or required experience. A comprehensive test will show that the applicant has the required set of skills.

See http://its-our-turn.com/ for a detailed white papers on the Arizona pest control industry.

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Sincerely,